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Full text of "History of Sanpete and Emery counties, Utah : with sketches of cities, towns and villages, chronology of important events, records of Indian wars, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens"

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Gc 

979.201 
Sa5h 
1242411 


M.  L. 


GENEALOGY  COLLECTION 


ALLEN  COUNTY  PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


833  01067  1227 


^AyQ/^ 


MAXTI    TEMPLE. 


hilSTOF^Y 


-OF- 


Sanpete  ^ind  Emery 
Counties  ■> 


UTAH 


WITH 

SKETCHES  OF  CITIES,  TOWNS  (qND  VILLAGES. 
CHRONOLOGY  OF  IMPORTANT  EVENTS. 

RECORDS  OF  INDIAN   WARS. 
PORTRAITS  OF  PROMINENT  PERSONS. 

AND 

BIOGRAPHIES  OF  REPRESENTATIVE  CITIZENS 


ILLUSTRATED. 


OGDEN 

W.  H.   LEVER 
1898. 


I'KKSS   UK   TJI 


SALT   I.AKK   CITY,    UTAH. 


1242411 

TABLE  OF  CONTENTS. 


SANPETE   COUNTY. 

History  of  Sanpete  County 11 

Sanpete  Chronology   45 

History  of  Manti 76 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Manti 95 

History  of  Mt.  Pleasant 201 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Mt.  Pleasant 228 

History  of  Ephraim 281 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Ephraim  293 

History  of  Fairview 351 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Fairview 358 

History  of  Moroni 395 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Moroni 402 

History  of  Gunnison 435 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Gunnison 444 

History  of  Spring  City J:72 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Spring  City 477 

History  of  Fountain  Green 50H 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Fountain  Green 513 

History  of  Mayfield 536 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Mayfield 539 

History  of  Wales 5^'' 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Wales 548 

History  of  Chester 555 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Chester 500 

History  of  I^ayette 5<)5 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Fayette 567 


6  TABLE   OF   CONTENTS. 

History  of  Sterling o72 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Sterling 575 

History  of  Milburn -"JSl 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Milburn 582 

History  of  Indianola  589 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Indianola 590 

EMERY  COUNTY. 

History  of  Emery  County 598 

History  of  Castle  Dale <)  10 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Castle  Dale Oil 

History  of  Cleveland 622 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Cleveland 623 

History  of  Desert  Lake 627 

History  of  Emery 628 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Emery 629 

History  of  Perron 635 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Ferron 636 

History  of  Green  River 044 

History  of  Huntington   645 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Huntington ....  646 

History  of  Lawrence 665 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Lawrence 666 

History  of  Molen 668 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Molen 669 

History  of  Orangeville 673 

Sketches  of  Prominent  Citizens  of  Orangeville 675 

History  of  Woodside  682 


PREFACE. 


Almost  half  a  century  has  elapsed  since  the  bold 
pioneers  entered  Sani^ete  Valley  to  make  homes  amidst 
the  savage  Indians  and  barren  deserts  of  sagebrush.  The 
veterans  of  '49  have  nearly  all  disappeared  from  the  val- 
leys where  they  chased  the  redmen,  erected  homes  and 
conquered  the  arid  lands,  converting  Sanpete  into  a  veri- 
table agricultural  paradise.  Many  of  the  sons  and  daugh- 
ters have  crossed  the  mountains  in  quest  of  new  vales  to 
conquer,  and  it  is  fitting  that  at  this  time  a  comprehen- 
sive histoiy  should  be  compiled.  The  book  here  pre- 
sented will  be  preserved  as  one  of  the  most  valuable 
family  treasures,  beneficial  for  its  pages  of  histoiy,  gene- 
alogy, biography,  commercial  and  educational  records 
and  the  familiar  features  of  representative  citizens. 

The  publisher  has  labored  at  great  disadvantage  in 
compiling  this  book,  because  such  a  work  has  never  been 
issued  and  data  could  not  easily  be  collected.  There  may 
be  some  errors  in  dates  and  omissions  of  events  of  minor 
importance,  as  is  always  the  case  in  the  first  issue  of  such 
a  volume,  but  the  most  searching  efforts  have  been  made 
to  have  it  a  reliable  and  comprehensive  work.  The 
authorities  consulted  were:  The  biographical  sketches 
of  over  one  thousand  residents  of  Sanpete  and     Emery 


10  PREFACE. 

counties;  personal  diaries  and  journals  of  many  pioneers; 
county,  town  and  church  records;  official  State  reports 
and  statistics;  Utah  histories,  gazetteers,  directories  and 
similar  publications;  files  of  newspapers  published  in  the 
county  and  State;  and  personal  interviews  of  some  of  the 
most  active  and  best  informed  citizens. 

Our  thanks  are  especially  due  Eev.  G.  W.  Martin 
and  the  Church  lleview,  for  data  concerning  the  Presby- 
terian missions;  Eev.  J.  D.  Gillilan  for  information  as  to 
the  history  of  Methodism;  William  H.  Peacock  for  the 
use  of  several  records  of  his  father's — Hon.  George  Pea- 
cock; Mrs.  A.  B.  Sidwell  for  reminiscences,  and  many 
others  who  have  made  coiTections  and  offered  sugges- 
tions when  the  manuscript  has  been  submitted.  The 
publisher  feels  that  he  has  fulfilled  evei-y  obligation  and 
given  the  subscribers  all  he  promised,  and  therefore  asks 
a  full,  earnest  and  impartial  review  of  tlie  work,  when 
all  will  agree  that  it  is  certainly  a  gem  and  well  worth 
the  time  and  money  expended  in  its  compilation. 

W.  H.  LEVEE, 

Ogden, 

Utah. 
October  2,  1898. 


SANPETE  COUNTY. 


SANPETE  COUNTY  occupies  a  central  position  in  the 
group  of  natural  divisions  comprising  the  State  of 
Utah.  It  includes  all  of  the  rich  valley  of  the  San- 
pitch,  with  an  elevation  of  between  5000  and  6000  feet 
above  sea  level,  being  bounded  on  the  north  by  Utah, 
east  by  Emery,  south  by  Sevier  and  west  by  Millard  and 
Juab  counties.  The  Wasatch  mountains  form  a  perfect 
natural  watershed  and  eastern  boundary  line,  dividing 
the  snow  reservoirs  on  the  summit,  and  supplying  numer- 
ous streams  for  irrigating  the  cultivated  area  in  the  val- 
ley. A  similar  boundary  is  formed  on  the  west  by  the 
Sanpitch  mountains,  thus  enclosing  one  of  the  most  de- 
lightful valleys  of  Utah.  The  Sanpitch  river  llo^\'s 
through  the  valley,  from  north  to  south,  being  fed  b}' 
numerous  streams  and  siDrings  from  the  snow  banks  of 
the  mountains.  The  names  of  river,  valley  and  county 
are  derived  from  a  tribe  of  Indians,  who  made  this  lovely 
mountain  dale  a  hunting  ground  before  being  conquered 
by  the  white  men.  A  remnant  of  this  tribe  yet  remains 
in  Thistle  Valley,  in  the  northern  part  of  this  county,  on 
lands  donated  to  them  by  the  people  who  made  of  this 
county  the  preseut  great  ''Granar-y  of  Utah.''  This  high 
mountain-walled  home  of  the  dusky  Sanpitch  natives  is 
now  distinctly  marked  as  Sanpete  county,  and  contains 
about  1820  square  miles,  being  60  miles  in  length  aud 
having  an  average  width  of  30  miles.  The  great  alti- 
tude, fertile  soil,  abundant  Avater  and  protection  from 


12  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

storms  make  it  a  most  healthful  and  desirable  location. 
The  present  population  numbers  probably  18,000  in- 
dustrious and  energetic  citizens,  devoted  to  their  homes 
and  countiy,  enjoying  health,  wealth  and  happiness  amid 
their  peaceful  and  comfortable  surroundings.  Farming, 
stockraising  and  Avool-growing  are  the  chief  industries, 
and  no  valley  of  similar  dimensions  in  the  Great  West 
produces  more  of  the  fruits  of  field  and  range  than  this 
county.  The  fifteen  beautiful  cities,  towns  and  villages 
comprising  the  county  attest  the  industry  of  the  pioneers 
and  their  sons  and  daughters  in  converting  the  sage 
brush  desert  into  a  veritable  mountain  paradise,  free 
from  drouths,  cyclones  and  the  plagues  and  storms  of 
many  less  fortunately  located  sections.  With  two  rail- 
ways passing  through  the  valley,  the  development  of 
mineral  resources  and  the  increasing  of  water  supply  for 
reclaiming  more  of  the  desert,  Sanpete  county  has  a  fu- 
ture not  sui'passed  by  any  county  within  the  borders  of 
the  State. 

EARLY    HISTORY. 

When  the  Utah  pioneers  had  secured  homes  in  Salt 
Lake  Valley  and  were  preparing  to  convert  the  desert 
into  fruitful  fields,  a  delegation  of  Ute  Indians,  under 
Chief  Walker,  appeared  in  Salt  Lake  City,  June  14,  1849, 
and  requested  colonists  for  Sanpitch  Valley,  to  teach  the 
natives  how  to  build  homes  and  till  the  soil.  An  explor- 
ing party,  consisting  of  Joseph  Horn,  W.  W.  Phelps,  Ira 
Willes  and  D.  B.  Huntington,  left  in  August,  and  with 
Walker  as  a  guide,  entered  the  beautiful  Sanpitch  Val- 
ley, crossing  the  divide  from  Salt  Creek  canyon,  and 
reached  the  present  site  of  Manti,  August  20,  1849.  They 
were  royally  entertained  by  the  savages,  and  after  a  few 
days  returned  and  reported  everything  favorable  for 
founding  a  colony. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  13"- 

A  company  of  about  fifty  families  from  Salt  Lalve 
City  and  Centerville  was  organized  and  started  late  in 
the  fall  for  Sanpitoii  Valley.  The  commanders  were 
Isaac  iMorley,  Setli  Taft  and  Charles  Shumway,  who  rep- 
resented the  civil  and  ecclesiastical  authorities  and  Nel- 
son Higgins  the  militars'.  Among  the  original  pioneers 
were  the  following  men,  some  being  accompanied  by 
their  families:  D.  B.  Huntington,  Barne}^  Ward,  John 
Lowry,  Sr.,  Titus  Billings,  G.  W.  Bradley,  Albert  Petty, 
O.  S.  Cox,  Albert  Smith,  Jezreel  Shomaker,  Cjrenus  H. 
Taylor,  Azariah  Smith,  Abram  Washburn,  John  D. 
Chase,  Isaac  Case,  Sylvester  Hulet,  William  Potter^ 
Gardner  Potter,  James  Brown,  Joseph  Allen,  M.  D.  Ham- 
ilton, William  Richej',  Harrison  Fugate,  Sylvester  Wil- 
cox, Gad  Yale,  John  Carter,  Isaac  Behunnin,  William 
Mendenhall,  Edwin  Whiting,  William  Tubbs,  John  Hart, 
John  Baker,  John  Elmer,  John  Butterfield,  Amos  Gustin, 
John  Cable  and  AY.  K.  Smith. 

The  company  cleared  roads,  built  bridges  and  suc- 
cessfully passed  through  Salt  Creek  canyon  without  any 
great  hardships,  and  moved  to  the  south  in  quest  of  a 
suitable  location.  Some  wanted  to  pitch  camp  at  Shum- 
way Springs,  but  better  counsel  prevailed,  and  the  pres- 
ent site  of  Manti  was  selected  as  the  frontier  town  of  cen- 
tral and  southern  Utah.  The  first  camp  was  made  on 
City  Creek  on  the  evening  of  November  22,  184:9,  and  tem- 
porally houses  made  of  wagon  boxes,  comprised  the  town. 
In  a  few  days  the  snow  began  falling  and  continued  al- 
most incessantly  until  the  ground  was  covered  to  a  depth 
of  three  feet  or  more,  and  the  colony  changed  quarters  to 
the  south  side  of  temple  hill,  where  some  families  had 
dugouts,  while  others  occupied  their  improvised  wagons 
and  tents. 

That  winter  was  most  severe  and  the  snow  fell  to  a 
gTeater  depth  than  ever  was  known  to  the  Indians,  and 


14  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

the  equal  has  never  since  been  recorded.  Men  and  boys 
were  engaged  almost  daily  in  shoveling  snow  in  winrows 
to  bare  the  grass  and  furnish  shelter  and  food  for  the 
starving  cattle.  Even  the  horns  of  cows  and  oxen  were 
sharpened  by  filing,  to  give  them  better  means  of  defense 
in  figliting  wild  animals,  and  enable  them  to  break 
through  the  crust  of  the  frozen  snow  in  search  of  the  dry 
grass.  Of  the  two  hundred  and  forty  head  of  cattle 
brought  in  by  the  colonists,  only  one  hundred  and  tliir- 
teen  Avere  living  the  following  June.  The  Indians  camped 
around  the  colony  greedily  devoured  the  dead  animals 
and  praised  their  white  neighbors  for  giving  them  the 
beef  to  ward  off  staiwation. 

When  the  camp  was  made  and  all  was  in  readiness 
for  the  winter,  a  company  of  twelve,  under  the  command 
of  Jerome  Bradley,  was  sent  back  to  Salt  Lake  City  after 
provisions.  TheA'  loaded  their  supplies  and  started  for 
Manti,  but  wei'e  detained  at  Provo,  on  account  of  re- 
ported Indian  hostilities.  Two  friendly  Indians,  Am- 
mon  and  Tabinan,  a  brother  of  Cliief  Walker,  volunteered 
their  assistance  as  guides,  and  the  pai'ty  left  Provo  and 
continued  on  to  the  "Forks  of  Salt  Creek,"  where  they 
Avere  forced  to  camp  on  account  of  the  great  depth  of  the 
snow.  The  next  January,  Tabinan  rode  into  Manti  and 
informed  the  people  that  a  Avhite  man  was  lying  across 
the  Sanpitch  river,  almost  dead.  A  party  headed  by 
Bishop  George  W.  Bradley,  started  out  on  snowshoes  and 
found  one  of  the  supply  company,  trying  to  Avade  through 
the  snow,  which  was  three  or  four  feet  deep.  He  re- 
ported the  company  snowed  in,  and  sleds  were  draAvn  by 
hand  over  the  snow,  ranging  in  depth  from  8  to  20  feet, 
to  their  camp  and  the  supplies  brought  in  during  the 
month  of  March.  Among  the  people  an'iving  then  was 
Daniel  Henrie  and  wife,  she  riding  on  one  of  the  sleds. 

In  the  evening  following  the  first  warm  day  of  early 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  15 

spring,  the  peaceful  colonists  were  startled  by  a  contin- 
uous hissing  and  rattling  of  myriads  of  rattlesnakes  that 
made  a  simultaneous  attack  upon  the  habitations,  wrig- 
gling and  writhing  about  in  the  boxes,  beds,  cupboards 
and  everywhere  they  could  get  inside  the  homes  of  the 
settlers.  A  general  warfare  was  inaugurated  by  the  aid 
of  pine-knot  torches,  and  many  hundreds  of  the  reptiles 
were  killed,  nearly  five  hundred  being  slaughtered  in  one 
night.  The  strangest  thing  connected  with  the  raid  of 
these  deadlj^  serpents  was  that  not  one  person  was  bit- 
ten, though  the  coiled  enemies  were  everywhere  present, 
in  threatening  attitudes,  frightening  men,  women  and 
children  on  every  hand.  Notwithstanding  the  severity 
of  the  winter  and  scarcity  of  food,  on  account  of  supply 
teams  being  snowed  in  at  Salt  Greek,  the  people  enjoyed 
remarivably  good  health  and  but  few  cases  of  sickness  oc- 
curred. 

In  the  spring  of  1850,  Avlien  time  for  plowing  and 
planting  came  there  was  but  one  team  able  to  draw  a 
plow  through  the  native  desert,  until  feed  was  obtained 
from  the  growing  grass.  This  team  belonged  to  Jezreel 
Shomaker,  and  was  used  to  break  small  garden  patches, 
while  the  other  poor  animals  were  resting  and  recruiting. 
The  snow  which  had  lain  on  the  ground  all  winter  to  the 
depth  of  three  feet  or  more  was  slow  in  melting  and  no 
crops  were  sown  until  June.  But,  the  colonists  were 
fortunate  in  having  a  fair  supply  of  seed,  and  the  soil 
proved  veiy  productive,  thereby  giving  some  green  vege- 
tables for  food  within  a  short  time  after  planting.  Small 
ditches  were  taken  from  the  creek,  and  the  water  freely 
applied  to  the  then  parched  sand. 

About  July  1st,  of  this  year.  Chief  Walker  and  a 
band  of  700  warriors  of  the  Sanpitch  Indians,  with  their 
squaws  and  pappooses,  returned  from  a  successful  forag- 
ing expedition  against  the  Shoshones  and  camped  in  a 


16  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

semi-circle  'round  tLe  colonists,  remaining  during  the 
year.  They  proudly  exhibited  their  trophies  of  war,  held 
frequent  scalp  dances  and  forced  the  squaws  and  chil- 
dren prisoners  to  dance  with  the  scalps  of  their  kindred 
attached  to  poles,  being  significant  of  humbleness.  While 
thus  being  amused,  Chief  Walker  and  his  leading  men 
would  tantalize  the  colonists  and  threaten  to  treat  them 
in  a  similar  manner.  These  fiendish  orgies  would  be 
kept  up  all  night  long,  while  the  small  colony  of  wliite 
people  slept  not  knoAving  but  that  they  would  never 
awaken. 

President  Brigham  Young  visited  the  colony  in 
August,  185(1,  and  cliristened  the  toAvn  ]\ranti,  in  liouor 
of  one  of  the  notable  cities  mentioned  in  the  Book  of 
Mormon,  and  the  county  he  called  Sanpete,  after  the  In- 
dian tribe  then  inhabiting  this  section,  the  chief  of  whom 
was  Sanpitch.  A  log  schoolhouse  was  erected  under  the 
direction  of  Isaac  ^lorley,  afterward  known  as  "Father 
Morley,"  and  Jesse  W,  Fox  was  installed  as  the  pioneer 
teacher.  He  was  soon  followed  by  Mrs.  jMary  Whiting, 
and  the  children  were  furnished  the  best  opportunities 
for  obtaining  an  education  that  the  primitive  colonists 
could  afford.  Soon  after  the  visit  of  President  Young  a 
small  grist  mill  was  erected  in  the  canyon  east  of  the 
city  by  Phineas  W.  Cook,  the  capital  being  furnished  by 
President  Young  and  Father  Morley.  The  only  mill  in 
use  previous  to  this  was  a  mammoth  coffee  grinder, 
which  was  passed  about  from  house  to  house  as  needed. 

The  act  of  Congress  organizing  Utah  Territory  was 
approved  September  9,  1S50,  and  Brigham  Young  was 
appointed  Governor,  A  provisional  form  of  government 
was  instituted  and  Isaac  Morley  and  Charles  Shumway 
represented  Sanpete  county  in  the  first  Legislative  As- 
sembly. That  legislature  met  in  Salt  Lake  City,  and 
passed  an  act  incorporating  Manti  City,  which  was  ap- 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  17 

proved  February  5,  1851,  at  the  same  time  Ogden  and 
Provo  were  incorporated,  they  being  the  only  cities  in 
rtah,  excepting  Salt  Lake  City.  During  this  season  the 
city,  comprising  ten  square  miJes,  was  surveyed  by  Jesse 
W.  Fox,  and  the  people  left  their  camp  under  "Temple 
Hill"  and  moved  to  their  city  lots.  Titus  Billings  and 
Jezreel  Shomaker  built  the  first  houses,  which  were  fol- 
lowed by  others  before  winter.  A  city  government  was 
formed,  and  the  colony  began  to  give  evidences  of  pros- 
perity. 

Sanpete  county  was  organized  by  authority  of  an 
act  of  the  Territorial  Legislature,  passed  February  3, 
1852,  and  Manti  was  made  the  county  seat.  The  first 
oflflcers  were  George  Peacock,  Judge;  Gardner  Lion, 
Phineas  W.  Cook  and  James  Richey,  Selectmen;  Nelson 
Higgins,  Sheriff;  John  Lowry,  Jr.,  Assessor  and  Collec- 
tor; George  Pectol,  Treasurer,  and  Cyrenus  H.  Taylor, 
Clerk.  The  county  then  comprised  an  unknown  area,  in- 
eluding  all  of  southeastern  Utah,  and  no  well  defined  de- 
scription was  given  until  an  act  of  the  Legislature,  ap- 
proved Januaiy  10,  1866,  gave  the  following  boundaries: 
"All  that  portion  of  the  Territory  bounded  south  by  Se- 
vier county,  west  by  Juab  county,  north  by  the  summit 
of  the  range  of  mountains  between  Sanpete  Valley  and 
Spanish  Fork  river,  and  along  the  summit  of  said  range 
until  it  intersects  Green  river,  thence  by  a  line  drawn 
due  east  from  said  intersection  to  the  thirty-second  me- 
ridian west  from  Washington  City,  and  south  by  said 
meridian.  Provided,  that  the  hay  ground  of  Thistle  Val- 
ley  shall  be  included  in  the  county." 

THE  WALKER  WAR. 

The  Indians,  under  Chief  Walker,  continually  gave 
indications  of  a  desire  to  stir  up  trouble  among  the  colo- 
nists, and  notwithstanding  his  pleadings  for  white  neigh- 


18  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

l)ors,  to  settle  among  them  and  teach  them  the  principles 
of  a  peaceful  and  happy  government,  this  hypocritical 
chieftain  simply  wanted  more  victims  to  slaughter.  An 
aged  diplomatic  chief,  Sowiatt,  pleaded  with  his  people 
to  let  the  white  men  build  homes  and  dwell  among  them 
in  peace,  and  his  counsel  generally  prevailed,  because  the 
Indians  knew  Walker  was  treacherous  and  could  not  be 
trusted  even  in  his  own  tribe.  Walker  desired  the  scalp 
of  Charles  Shumway,  and  at  last  detennined  to  make  an 
effort  at  getting  some  one  to  torture,  so  he  could  frighten 
his  pale  face  friends. 

One  day  in  the  early  summer  of  1853,  while  most  of 
the  able-bodied  men  were  at  Pleasant  Ci*eek,  assisting  M. 
D.  Hamilton,  or  in  Salt  Lake  City  after  supplies,  Walker 
and  a  band  of  painted  warriors  entered  Manti  and  de- 
manded the  body  of  Shumway  and  others  against  whom 
they  had  imaginai-y  grievances,  that  they  might  be  tor- 
tured and  put  to  death.  This  demand  was  not  granted, 
and  an  attack  was  threatened.  The  old  men,  women  and 
boys  remaining  in  the  city  determined  to  resist  the  sav- 
ages, and  made  preparations  for  battle,  but  the  political 
leader,  Sowiatt,  conquered  and  hostilities  ceased.  Walker 
was  so  humiliated  at  the  apparent  cowardice  of  his 
braves  that  he  mounted  a  pony  and  rode  hastily  away 
into  the  mountains  to  sulk  for  a  month,  hoping  this  act 
would  draw  the  warriors'  affections  from  Sowiatt  to  him. 

On  July  18,  1853,  Alex.  Keel  was  killed  at  Payson, 
by  Arropine,  a  brother  of  Walker,  known  among  the  In- 
dians as  Siegnerouch.  This  act  was  the  signal  for  be- 
ginning a  general  warfare  against  the  settlers  through- 
out southern  Utah,  and  on  the  very  next  day,  Indians 
fired  upon  the  guard  at  Pleasant  Creek,  now  Mount 
Pleasant.  The  day  following  &  raid  was  made  upon  the 
herds  of  Manti  and  several  horses  and  cattle  were  stolen 
and  driven  into  the  mountains.       A  similar  attack  was 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  19 

made  on  the  range  near  Nephi,  and  William  Jolley  was 
wounded  by  Indians  at  Spring^ille.  The  colonists  be- 
came alarmed  and  at  once  organized  for  a  defense  of 
their  homes  and  families.  A  company  of  fifty  militia- 
men, under  Capt.  P.  AV.  Conover,  was  sent  out  from 
Provo  to  assist  the  settlers  at  Mount  Pleasant,  who  were 
few  in  proportion  to  the  savages. 

The  troops  met  the  Indians  on  July  23rd,  at  Hamil- 
ton's mill,  east  of  Mount  Pleasant,  and  engaged  in  a 
fierce  battle,  resulting  in  the  death  of  six  warriors  and  a 
complete  routing  of  the  savages,  who  fled  to  the  moun- 
tains. The  settlers  then  removed  from  Mount  Pleasant 
to  Spring  City,  where  a  small  fort  had  been  built,  and  by 
the  aid  of  the  militia  were  enabled  to  harvest  their  crops. 
But  the  Indians  were  on  the  alert  and  did  not  wait  long 
to  recruit  from  the  previous  engagement,  for  on  Sunday, 
August  2nd,  Spring  City  was  attacked  and  all  the  horses 
and  cattle  were  rounded  up  and  started  for  the  moun- 
tains. The  herders  were  fired  upon  and  fled  to  the 
fort  for  protection,  while  the  Indians  rode  away  yelling 
and  waving  their  arms  in  defiance  of  the  small  garrison. 

Tavo  of  the  herding  ponies  eluded  the  Indians  and  re- 
turned to  the  fort,  thereby  giving  the  settlers  a  means  of 
communication  with  Manti,  the  only  point  from  which 
relief  could  be  expected.  A  messenger  was  dispatched 
immediately,  and  by  riding  west  across  the  valley,  then 
south,  succeeded  in  evading  the  vigilant  Indian  scouts 
patroling  the  eastern  trail.  The  express  messenger 
reached  Manti  about  three  o'clock  in  the  afternoon,  mak- 
ing one  of  the  quickest  trips  ever  recorded.  When  the 
news  was  received  drums  were  sounded,  cattle  collected 
and  sentries  posted  at  all  prominent  points,  while  hasty 
preparations  w  ere  made  for  sending  relief  to  Spring  City 
Three  wagons  with  twelve  yoke  of  oxen  hitched  to  each 
accompanied  by  teamsters  and  twelve  mounted  guards 


•20  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

left  as  quickly  as  possible,  reaching  Spring  City  at  day- 
light next  morning.  The  colonists  were  taken  to  Manti 
and  given  quarters  in  a  fort  which  had  been  constructed 
that  year. 

The  entire  population  of  Sanpete  at  the  time  of  the 
evacuation  of  Spring  City  numbered  only  765  men,  wo- 
men and  children,  Avho  remained  in  the  fort  at  INIanti  un- 
til the  spring  of  1854.  All  parties  engaged  in  wood  haul- 
ing, herding  and  other  outside  work  Avere  armed  and  con- 
sisted of  a  dozen  or  more  men,  one-half  standing  guard 
while  the  others  worked.  A  guard  was  kept  at  the  little 
mill  near  the  mouth  of  INlanti  canyon  to  prevent  an  at- 
tack from  Indians  until  sufficient  flour  could  be  made  for 
the  winter  supjjly.  But,  on  October  1st,  both  miller  and 
guard,  John  E.  Warner  and  William  Mills  were  killed  by 
the  Indians,  who  made  their  escape,  leaving  the  mill  un- 
disturbed. They  returned  later  and  burnt  the  mill, 
claiming  it  was  done  in  retaliation  for  the  shooting  of 
five  Indians,  convicted  of  stealing  cattle,  and  ordered  ex- 
ecuted by  Maj.  Higgins. 

A  few  days  previous  to  the  killing  of  the  miller  and 
guard,  four  ox  teams,  loaded  with  grain,  started  for  Salt 
Lake  City,  being  followed  a  few  hours  later  by  twelve 
horse  teams  hauling  provisions,  feed  and  Saints  en  route 
to  the  semi-annual  conference  and  intent  upon  visiting 
friends  in  the  north.  Arrangements  were  made  for 
camping  at  Shumway  Springs,  but  the  first  teams  kept 
going  until  they  reached  Uinta  Springs,  now  Fountain 
Green.  Before  the  rear  teams  reached  camp  the  Indians 
made  an  attack,  killing  all  the  drivers,  Thomas  Clark, 
William  E.  Keid,  William  Luke  and  James  Nelson,  and 
driving  away  the  oxen.  Having  no  use  for  the  grain,  the 
savages  cut  open  the  sacks  and  scattered  wheat  over  the 
ground  to  complete  their  work  of  destruction  and  show 
their  hatred  for  the  white  men. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  21 

The  mutilated  and  mangled  bodies  of  those  unfortu- 
nate freighters  were  picked  up  by  the  rear  of  the  com- 
pany and  removed  to  Salt  Creek  for  interment.  Several 
Indians  watched  them  from  the  cover  of  cedars  on  the 
mountain  slope,  and  folloAved  down  the  canyon,  making 
frantic  gesticulations  of  joy  over  their  massacre.  When 
the  company  reached  Nephi  seven  Indians  who  had  kept 
at  a  safe  distance  and  yelled  defiance  at  the  whites, 
were  promptly  arrested  and  shot.  This  had  the  desired 
effect  upon  the  remaining  warriors,  who  began  to  fear 
the  vengeance  of  their  new  neighbors,  and  hostilities 
ceased  for  several  months.  A  few  days  previous  to  this 
Capt.  J.  W.  Gunnison,  United  States  Topographical  En- 
gineer, and  a  corps  of  seven  men,  including  William  Pot- 
ter of  ]\ranti,  Avere  killed  by  Indians,  while  in  camp  oil 
the  Sevier  river,  west  of  Fillmore. 

During  1854  the  Indians  confined  their  depredations 
chiefly  to  Millard  county,  but  frequently  raided  the  herd- 
ing grounds  of  Sanpete  and  stole  cattle  and  horses,  al- 
ways succeeding  in  making  good  their  escape.  On  Jan- 
uary 20,  1855,  Walker  died  at  Meadow  Creek,  in  Millard 
county,  and  the  war  ended.  Arropine,  who  had  begun 
the  work  of  extenninating  the  white  men,  became  chief 
of  Walker's  band,  and  made  a  treaty  of  peace.  He  pro- 
fessed much  love  for  the  Mormon  people,  and,  as  an  evi- 
dence of  his  friendship,  deeded  the  entire  county  to  Brig- 
ham  Young,  trustee  in  tr-ust  for  the  church.  A  copy  of 
this  remarkable  document,  as  found  recorded  in  "Book  B, 
Church  Transfer"  is  hereto  appended. 

"Be  it  known  by  these  presents,  that  I,  Siegnerouch 
(Arropine),  of  Manti  City,  in  the  county  of  Sanpete,  and 
Territory  of  Utah,  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  good 
will  which  I  have  to  the  Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of  Latter- 
Day  Saints,  give  and  convey  unto  Brigham  Young, 
trustee  in  trust  for  said  church,  his  successors  in  office, 


22  HISTOEY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

all  my  claim  to  and  ownership  of  the  following  described 
property,  to-wit:  The  portion  of  land  and  country  known 
as  Sanpete  county,  together  with  all  material  and  timber 
on  the  same,  valued  |155,000;  ten  horses,  valued  |500; 
four  cows,  |120;  one  bull,  |40;  farming  tools  valued  at 
|10;  in  all  |155,765,  together  Avitli  all  the  rights,  privi- 
leges and  appurtenances  thereunto  belonging  or  apper- 
taining. I  also  covenant  and  agree  that  I  am  the  lawful 
claimant  and  owner  of  said  property,  and  will  warrant 
and  forever  defend  the  same  unto  the  said  trustee  in 
trust,  his  successors  in  office  and  assigns,  etc. 

HIS 
"SIEGNEKOUCH  (ARROPINE.)  X 

MAKK. 
''Witness:     George  Snow,  Jl.  Wilson    Glenn,    John 
Patten." 

THE  FIRST  COLONIES. 

In  the  spring  of  1852  a  company  consisting  of  about 
fifteen  families,  under  the  command  of  Jiimes  Allred,  re- 
moved from  Salt  Lake  City  and  began  a  settlement  at 
Spring  City.  The  colony  was  small  and  suffered  many 
hardships  from  Indians  and  other  disadvantages  of  an 
isolated  community.  But,  the  brave  colonists  held  out 
against  all  misfortunes  and  built  a  fort  for  protection. 
The  following  spring  a  company  from  Manti,  under  the 
direction  of  Madison  D.  Hamilton,  began  a  colony  at 
Pleasant  Creek,  now  Mount  Pleasant,  given  in  some  of 
the  archives  as  "a  pleasant  spot  twenty-four  miles  north 
of  Manti."  The  Indians  forced  them  to  take  refuge  in 
the  fort  at  Spring  City  in  July,  and  in  August  that  settle- 
ment was  abandoned.  The  Indians  burned  the  fort  in 
January,  1S54,  and  no  further  efforts  were  made  to  re- 
build for  five  years. 

Early  in  the  spring  of  1854  a  number  of  families  left 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  28 

the  Manti  fort  and  located  on  Pine  Creek,  seven  miles 
north  of  Manti,  the  site  aftei*w\ard  being  called  Ephraim, 
the  name  coming  from  the  Book  of  Mormon.  Isaac  Be- 
hunnin  had  built  a  home  on  this  creek  as  early  as  the 
spring  of  1851,  but  had  to  return  to  Manti  for  protection 
against  the  Indians.  This  settlement  was  really  the  first 
successful  approach  toward  forming  a  colony  outside  of 
Manti.  Several  additions  were  made  to  their  numbers 
during  the  fall  of  1851  by  families  of  Scandinavians  from 
Salt  Lake  City.  The  grasshoppers  invaded  their  farms 
in  1855  and  1856  and  destroyed  almost  all  crops,  causing 
much  disaster  and  privation,  but  the  noble  band  with- 
stood the  pangs  of  hunger  and  poverty  and  oA^ercame  all 
obstacles. 

The  year  1859  was  favorable  for  locating  new  colo- 
nies, because  of  peace  having  been  concluded  with  the 
Indians,  and  an  early  spring  giving  evidence  of  a  good 
crop  season.  A  company,  made  up  of  James  Ivie,  W.  S. 
Seely,  David  Jones,  Isaac  Allred  and  others,  entered 
upon  the  present  site  of  Mount  Pleasant  in  April  and  be- 
gan the  work  of  a  permanent  colony.  The  same  month 
James  Allred  and  others  returned  to  Spring  City  on 
Canal  Creek,  and  began  a  second  time  the  settlement  of 
what  was  for  some  time  known  as  "Little  Denmark." 
In  March  of  this  year  George  W.  Bradley  and  eight  oth- 
ers from  Nephi  located  Moroni,  "eighteen  miles  north  of 
Manti."  In  the  fall  Geo.  W.  Johnson  and  others  settled 
Fountain  Green,  put  up  some  hay  and  built  a  few  houses. 
Gunnison  was  settled  this  season  by  Jacob  Hutchinson 
and  company. 

Fairview,  generally  called  North  Bend  by  the  old 
settlers,  was  first  colonized  during  the  winter  of  1859,  by 
a  company  consisting  of  James  H.  Jones,  Henry  W.  San- 
derson, Jehu  Cox,  Isaac  Y.  Vance,  Lindsay  A.  Brady  and 
others.     Wales,  or  Coalville,  was  located  this  year  by 


24  HISTOKY   or   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

John  E.  Reese,  and  in  1862  about  fifteen  families  settled 
there  and  opened  the  pioneer  coal  fields  of  Utah.  All 
those  early  colonies  were  Aveak  in  numbers  and  suffered 
many  hardships  during  the  first  few  years  and  during  the 
Black  Hawk  war,  the  smallest  i^laces  had  to  be  aban- 
doned, while  the  settlers  sought  refuge  at  the  stronger 
points.  The  early  settlers  were  strong  men  and  women, 
possessed  with  indomitable  courage  and  a  desire  to  se- 
cure homes,  or  the  county  could  not  have  been  settled  un- 
der such  discouraging  and  troublesome  circumstances, 

THE  BLACK  hfAWK  WAR. 

Indian  treachery  is  proverbial,  and  the  insincerity  of 
the  redmen  was  fully  illustrated  in  their  failure  to  keep 
the  treaty  made  by  Arropine,  on  the  death  of  Walker. 
The  warriors  continued  their  depredations,  especially  on 
unarmed  travelers,  Avliom  they  met  in  lonely  canyons  or 
found  alone  hunting  or  herding  in  the  isolated  foothills. 
Even  Arropine  and  his  braves  remained  sullen  and  often 
made  threats  of  an  outbreak  if  more  beef  and  biscuits 
were  not  furnished  immediately.  The  settlers  soon 
learned  that  the  transfer  of  the  county  because  of  good 
will  and  friendship  would  cost  them  the  total  value  with 
much  more  added  for  interest,  to  keep  the  Indians 
clothed  and  fed  and  maintain  peace.  When  a  demand 
was  made  by  AiTopine  the  colonists  donated  beef,  flour 
and  clothing  and  thereby  kept  peace. 

On  May  21,  1855,  A.  N.  Billings  and  a  company  of 
forty  men  were  sent  from  Sanpete  to  settle  the  Elk  Moun- 
tain country  and  make  peace  with  the  Indians.  They 
crossed  the  Grand  river  and  erected  the  Mormon  fort, 
where  Moab  is  now  located.  In  August  some  of  the  colo- 
nists returned  to  Manti,  and  on  September  3rd  the  In- 
dians made  an  attack,  killing  Wiseman  Hunt,  Edward 
Edwards  and  William  Behunnin  and  wounding  Capt.  A. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  25 

N.  Billings.  The  colonists  entered  the  fort,  which  the 
Indians  immediately  surrounded  and  gave  notice  of  their 
intention  to  massacre  all  the  inmates.  The  next  day 
some  of  the  chiefs  interceded  in  behalf  of  the  white  men 
and  the  imprisoned  colonists  were  permLitted  to  return  to 
their  homes  unmolested,  Avith  the  understanding  that  the 
settlement  should  be  abandoned  and  Grand  Valley  left 
in  undisputed  possession  of  the  Utes. 

In  the  spring  of  1858  James  Miller  and  George  M. 
Bright  were  killed  and  five  others  wounded  by  Indians, 
during  an  attack  on  the  Salmon  river  settlement,  which 
caused  the  abandonment  of  the  colony.  On  June  4th  of 
this  year  Niels  Jorgensen  and  wife,  Jens  Turkelsen  and 
Christian  E.  Kjerluf  were  killed  by  a  band  of  fourteen 
Sanpitch  Indians,  in  Salt  Creek  canyon.  October  5th 
Samuel  Brown  and  Josiah  Call  were  massacred  by  In- 
dians on  Cliicken  creek.  These  periodical  attacks  were 
kept  up  by  marauding  bands  of  Sanpitches  and  Utes, 
and  no  man  was  safe  outside  the  settlements.  James 
Hanahin,  a  deserter  from  the  United  States  army,  was 
killed  by  an  Indian  on  August  7,  1860,  near  Manti,  the 
savage  firing  upon  him  from  ambush. 

In  March,  1865,  the  Indians  camped  around  Manti 
began  to  be  very  quarrelsome  and  insulting  when  in  the 
presence  of  the  colonists,  and  many  threats  were  made 
indicating  the  desire  for  some  pretext  for  war.  On  April 
9th,  John  Lowiy  and  others  had  a  quarrel  with  Jake, 
one  of  the  chiefs,  about  some  cattle  the  Indians  boasted 
of  stealing.  This  altercation  was  considered  sufficient 
provocation  for  declaring  open  hostilities,  and  Chief 
Black  Hawk  hurriedly  assembled  his  warriors  for  the 
conflict.  A  party  of  men  was  sent  out  from  Manti  on 
the  day  following  the  disturbance,  to  collect  the  cattle 
for  the  purpose  of  ascertaining  how  many  had  been 
stolen.     Black  Hawk  and  fifteen  warriors  fired  upon  the 


26  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

men,  near  Twelve  Mile  creek,  and  killed  Peter  J.  Ludvig- 
sen.  The  Indians  were  in  ambush  and  immediately  de- 
camped for  the  south,  driving'  away  some  cattle  and  ut- 
tering oaths  of  defiance. 

On  the  same  day  of  the  attack  on  Manti  herders, 
Elijah  B.  Ward  and  James  Anderson  were  massacred 
and  scalped  in  Salina  canyon,  the  Indians  making  good 
their  escape  into  the  mountains  and  driving  some  stock 
stolen  from  the  settlers.  The  people  were  now  thor- 
oughly aroused  and  deteiTniued  upon  waging  an  uncom- 
promising warfare  against  the  treacherous  redskins. 
Col.  J.  T.  S.  AUred,  with  eighty-four  members  of  the  San- 
pete militia  pursued  the  Indians  and  w^ere  sui^prised  and 
fired  on  in  Salina  canyon,  April  12th,  and  Jens  Sorenson 
of  Ephraim  and  William  Kearnes  of  Gunnison  were 
killed.  The  sudden  attack  from  ambush  so  confused  the 
command  that  a  i)i*^cipitous  retreat  to  Salina  followed 
without  any  further  demonstrations.  At  the  request  of 
Col.  Allred,  a  company  of  men  was  picked  from  the  ranks 
by  Col.  W.  S.  Snow  and  returned  to  the  scene  of  action 
and  secured  the  bodies  of  those  killed. 

The  Indians  did  not  await  any  further  attack,  but 
hurried  away  into  the  mountains,  taking  all  the  cattle 
they  had  stolen.  On  May  25th,  Jens  Larsen  was  killed, 
while  herding  sheep,  near  Fairview,  and  the  next  day 
John  Given,  wife  and  four  children  were  massacred  in 
Thistle  A^alley,  presumably  by  the  same  band  of  Indians 
who  had  shot  Larsen.  May  30tli,  David  M.  Jones  of  St. 
George  was  shot  and  killed  near  Fairview,  while  in  the 
mountains  hunting  his  horses.  July  14th  of  this  year 
Robert  Gillespie  of  Mount  Pleasant  and  James  Robinson 
of  Alma  were  killed  by  Indians  near  Salina.  Thus  the 
work  of  secret  murders  continued,  Avhile  the  Indians  kept 
driving  away  horses  and  cattle  and  retreating  into  the 
mountains,  where  they  were  safe. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  27 

In  Julj^  President  Brigham  Young  visited  Sanpete 
countv'  and  conferred  with  the  citizens  as  to  the  best  pol- 
icy to  pursue  to  prevent  further  depredations  from  the 
hostile  foe.  On  July  15th  Col.  Warren  S.  Snow  was 
elected  a  Brigadier-General  and  immediately  took  com- 
mand of  the  militia  and  minute  men.  He  pursued  the 
Indians  into  Grass  Valley,  and  on  the  18th  engaged  in  a 
pitched  battle,  which  resulted  in  the  killing  of  twelve 
Indians  and  wounding  one  of  Gen.  Snow's  command.  The 
savages  fled  into  the  mountains  and  eluded  pursuit.  On 
July  26th  the  settlement  of  Glenwood,  Sevier  county, 
composed  chiefly  of  those  called  from  Sanpete,  was  at- 
tacked by  Indians  and  one  man  Avas  killed  and  two 
horses  wounded.  An  expi'ess  messenger  notified  the  mil- 
itary command,  and  Gen.  Snow  and  company  followed 
the  redskins  to  Green  River  without  capturing  any  of 
them  or  having  an  engagement. 

The  militia  was  kept  on  the  alert,  sleeping  on  their 
guns  and  expecting  orders  to  move  at  any  moment.  An 
attack  was  threatened  on  the  southern  colonies,  and  Gen- 
eral Snow  charged  upon  the  Indians,  forcing  them  back 
to  Fish  Lake,  where,  on  September  1st,  a  spirited  en- 
gagement was  fought,  resulting  in  the  death  of  seven  In- 
dians and  the  wounding  of  General  Snow  and  two  of  his 
command.  The  troops  returned  to  Manti  on  September 
24th,  and  rested  nearly  two  months.  October  17th  of 
this  year  the  Indians  attacked  some  of  the  settlers  at 
Ephraim,  killing  Morten  P.  Kuhr  and  wife,  Elizabeth 
Peterson,  William  Thoi'pe,  Soren  N.  Jespersen,  Benjamin 
J.  Black  and  William  T.  Hill,  and  driving  away  all  the 
stock  they  could  find,  numbering  about  100  head.  Again 
the  raiders  were  successful  in  escaping  without  giving 
battle. 

November  6th  the  Indians  raided  Circleville,  killed 
three  men  and  star-ted  off  with  the  town  herd.     The  citi- 


28  HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY. 

zens  gave  chase  and  fired  with  such  certain  aim  that  the 
thieves  were  completely  routed  and  left  the  cattle  for 
their  owners,  while  the  redmen  retreated  in  great  haste 
into  the  mountains.  This  was  the  last  attack  for  the 
year,  as  the  winter  was  very  severe,  the  snow  deep  and 
the  canyons  impassable.  The  Indians  had  sufficient  stock 
feeding'  upon  the  ranges  in  the  San  Juan  and  other  south- 
ern valleys  to  supply  them  and  did  not  care  to  tempt  the 
white  men  to  pursue  them  into  their  camping  grounds. 
The  colonists  passed  through  a  severe  winter,  with  but 
little  food  for  man  or  beast,  on  account  of  the  grasshop- 
pers having  destroyed  the  crops.  But  the  military  duties 
had  to  be  performed  to  guard  their  stock  and  homes 
against  the  Indians. 

AVith  the  opening  of  spring  in  1866  the  Indians  re- 
sumed their  work  of  stealing  cattle  and  murdering  de- 
fenseless colonists.  About  Februai'iN'  1st,  when  spring 
work  was  beginning  in  the  southern  settlements,  a  band 
of  hostile  Indians  raided  Washington,  Kane  county, 
killed  Doctor  Whitmer  and  a  son  of  John  M.  Moody  and 
drove  away  all  the  cattle  that  could  be  found  on  the 
range.  This  was  evidence  sufficient  that  the  troubles 
were  not  over,  and  General  Warren  S.  Snow  with  a  part 
of  his  command  started  for  the  scene  of  hostilities.  At 
Nephi,  on  March  12th,  he  arrested  five  renegade  Indians, 
on  the  charge  of  having  been  engaged  in  the  various 
raids.  The  prisoners  were  taken  to  Manti  and  put  in 
jail  till  evidence  could  be  obtained  against  them.  With 
them  were  two  important  chiefs,  Sanpitch  and  Anka- 
wakets,  who  were  held  in  the  hope  of  capturing  the  no- 
torious leader  Black  Hawk. 

AVhen  the  prisoners  were  safeh'  secured  General 
Snow  and  men  returned  to  Nephi  and  captured  four  more 
Indians,  known  to  have  been  connected  with  the  Black 
Hawk  raiding  band.     They  were  taken  to  Manti,  tried 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  29 

and  convicted,  and  shot  by  order  of  the  imprisoned 
chiefs,  A\  ho  hoped  thereby  to  gain  their  own  liberty.  By 
this  time  the  Indians  were  very  much  excited  and  threat- 
ened a  perfect  slaughter  of  all  helpless  white  persons, 
wherever  found.  On  April  2nd  an  attack  was  made  on 
Salina,  three  persons  Avere  killed,  another  wounded  and 
all  the  stock  was  driven  away,  while  the  whoops  of  de- 
rision filled  tJie  air  Avith  savage  effrontery.  The  impris- 
oned chieftains  and  comrades  at  Manti,  on  hearing  of 
this  fresh  outbreak,  began  to  tremble  and  give  signs  of 
uneasiness.  They  feared  the  commanding  officer  would 
order  them  put  to  death,  and  on  the  night  of  the  14th 
broke  jail  and  attempted  to  escape. 

The  guard  pursued  the  Indians  and  killed  three  with- 
in the  limits  of  the  city.  A  posse  followed  the  fleeing 
fugitives  to  Mt.  Nebo  and  tracked  them  far  up  into  the 
snow  banks,  where  they  were  shot.  Chief  Sanpitch  was 
killed  on  April  18th  while  in  hiding  between  Moroni  and 
Fountain  Green.  Three  days  later  the  settlement  of  Sa- 
lina was  abandoned,  teams  being  sent  from  Manti  and 
Gunnison  to  haul  the  inhabitants  with  their  effects  to 
the  north,  April  22nd  William  Ivory  and  Thomas  Jones 
were  fired  on  by  Indians  in  ambush  near  Fairview,  and 
Jones  was  killed,  Ivory  being  severely  wounded.  Three 
days  later  a  raid  w^as  made  on  Marysvale,  one  of  the  fron- 
tier towns  of  Sevier  county,  Albert  Lewis  was  killed, 
three  men  wei^  wounded  and  the  stock  driven  into  the 
mountains,  the  Indians  escaping  without  any  injury. 

The  country  being  so  sparsely  settled  and  raids  of  so 
frequent  occurrence,  it  was  almost  impossible  for  men  to 
attend  to  tbeir  farms  and  stock  and  fight  Indians  without 
some  assistance.  When  the  people  of  Utah  and  Salt 
Lake  counties  learned  the  real  condition  of  their  friends 
in  the  south  preparations  were  made  for  reinforcing  the 
military  power.     On  May  4,  1866,  Capt.  P.  W.  Couover, 


30  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

with  fifty  men  from  Utah  coimty,  reported  to  General 
Snow  for  orders,  and  two  days  later  Col.  Heber  P.  Kim- 
ball reached  Manti,  having  a  company  of  fifty  men  from 
Salt  Lake  county.  On  the  14th  Ool.  W.  B.  Pace  took 
command  of  the  forces  under  Capt.  Conover,  and  with 
such  an  additional  militaiy  force  the  citizens  felt  secure 
and  proceeded  to  their  daily  duties  in  comparative  safe- 
ty. The  Indians  kept  away  from  such  a  formidable  an-ay 
of  troops,  but  continued  their  depredations. 

June  10th  the  Indians  made  an  attack  on  the  settlers 
of  Kound  Valley,  killed  James  Ivie  and  drove  away  all 
the  stock  in  sight.  Col.  Pace  and  command  intercepted 
the  marauders  at  Gravelly  Ford,  on  the  Sevier  i-iver,  near 
Saliua,  and  a  shai-p  battle  of  several  hours'  duration  was 
fought,  resulting  in  the  killing  of  several  Indians  and 
wounding  one  member  of  the  militia.  The  troops  re- 
treated to  Gunnison  on  account  of  the  ammunition  being 
exhausted.  When  moi'^  powder  had  been  obtained  a 
larger  force  under  the  command  of  Gen.  Snow  and  Colo- 
nels Kimball  and  Pace,  advanced  upon  the  Indians  and 
pursued  them  some  distance,  but  did  not  have  a  second 
engagement.  The  troops  returne<l  to  jNIanti  and  on  June 
20th,  Gen.  D.  H.  Wells  arrived  from  Salt  Lake  C^ty  and 
took  command  of  the  entire  forces. 

Three  days  after  Gen.  Wells  took  command,  James 
Ivie,  Jr.,  killed  a  friendly  Indian  in  retaliation  of  the 
death  of  his  father,  whom  the  Indians  had  murdered  only 
a  for-tnight  before.  This  act  incensed  the  savages  more 
than  anything  that  had  ever  transpired,  and  gave  them 
an  excuse  for  entering  more  vigoroush'  upon  their  bloody 
work  of  massacreiug  white  settlers.  June  24th  they  at- 
tacked a  portion  of  Col.  Kimball's  command,  under  Capt, 
Peter  Dewey,  in  Thistle  Valley,  killing  Charles  Brown 
and  wounding  James  Snow.  Maj.  Ivie  reinforced  Capt. 
Dewey  and  the  Indians  were  forced  to  retreat  hastily  into 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  31 

the  mountains,  after  losing  several  wan-iors.  Three  days 
later  tJie  redskins  raided  Spanish  Fork,  and  killed  John 
Edmiston  of  Manti,  wounded  another  man  and  drove 
away  all  the  stock. 

The  settlers  of  Spanish  Fork  and  Springville  com- 
bined their  forces  and  pursued  the  Indians  as  far  as  they 
dared  follow  in  the  canyons,  and  secured  most  of  the 
stolen  cattle.  The  Indians  continued  on  into  Sanpete, 
then  into  Sevier  and  sought  the  unprotected  points  as 
places  of  attack.  They  kept  on  the  mountains  when  near 
Manti  or  in  the  vicinity  of  the  troops,  and  thus  avoided 
an  engagement.  About  July  1st  of  this  year,  1866,  Gen. 
AY  ells,  in  obedience  to  instructions  from  President  Brig- 
ham  Young,  issued  an  order  for  the  abandonment  of  the 
settlement  in  Piute  county,  and  the  colonists  removed  to 
Sanpete,  most  of  them  locating  in  Ephraim.  During  this 
summer  the  Indians  became  so  troublesome  in  the  vicin- 
ity of  Faiiwiew,  Fountain  Green  and  AYales  that  the  colo- 
nists were  compelled  to  leave  their  homes  and  remain  in 
the  larger  settlements  until  the  autumn,  to  insure  safety. 

On  July  12th  Captain  Bigier  and  sixty  men  from 
Davis  county,  reached  Manti  and  relieved  the  troops  from 
Salt  Lake  county.  The  new  men  soon  had  an  opportu- 
nity for  a  conflict,  for  on  the  27th  of  this  month  the  In- 
dians made  a  night  raid  on  the  stock  of  Ephraim  and 
Manti,  driving  away  about  150  head.  Gen.  Snow  and 
Capt.  Bigier,  with  their  commands,  pursued  the  thieves 
into  Castle  Valley,  but  did  not  succeed  in  recovering  the 
cattle  or  capturing  any  Indians.  This  successful  raid 
gave  the  redmen  enough  beef  for  the  winter  and  but  few 
people  were  troubled  any  more  until  the  following  spring. 
They  managed  to  keep  at  a  safe  distance  from  the  troops 
and  enjoy  the  fruits  of  their  many  exploits,  while  making 
calculations  on  the  possible  strength  of  their  enemies 
w^hen  another  spring  should  open. 


32  '  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

When  the  first  warm  days  of  March,  1867,  had 
cleared  away  the  snow  and  the  settlers  at  Tiichfield  were 
contemplating  beginning  farm  work,  the  Indians  dashed 
throngh  the  town  and  on  toward  Glenwood.  They 
found  a  company  traveling  with  an  ox  team  and  mur- 
dered Jens  Peter  Peterson  and  wife  and  Mary  Smith. 
The  citizens  of  Glenwood  gave  battle  and  a  sharp  en- 
gagement resulted,  in  which  the  Indians  were  victorious 
and  succeeded  in  getting  possession  of  about  one  hundred 
head  of  stock  and  driving  the  herd  into  their  mountain 
retreat.  x\pril  1st  President  Young  counselled  the  set- 
tlers to  abandon  their  homes  and  remove  noi-th  for  safe- 
tj.  Teams  Avere  sent  from  Sanpete  and  a  company  of 
minutei  men  assisted  in  removing  all  the  inhabitants  of 
Kichfield  and  Glenwood  to  this  county.  The  removal  oc- 
curred about  May  1st,  and  the  homes  and  farms  of  that 
section  were  emptj-  and  deserted. 

At  this  time  Gen.  D.  H.  Wells  released  Gen.  Warren 
S.  Snow  from  his  command  and  placed  Gen.  W.  B.  Pace 
in  charge  of  the  entire  Sanpete  military'  district,  then 
comprising  all  of  southeastern  Utah.  He  inaugurated  a 
new  policy  and  placed  all  the  stock  of  the  several  settle- 
ments under  heavy  guard  day  and  night.  This  foiled  the 
Indians  in  their  stealing  operations  and  checked  their 
ravages  for  a  time.  But,  on  June  1st,  Louis  Lund  was 
killed  and  Jasper  I\obertson  wounded  while  herding 
stock  near  Fountain  Green,  and  about  forty  horses  were 
taken  from  them  and  driven  away.  The  next  day  Major 
J.  AY.  A'ance  and  Sergeant  Heber  Houtz  were  killed  by 
Indians  at  Twelve-Mile  creek,  and  Capt.  Miles  and  Pri- 
vate Tanner  narrowly  escaped. 

After  defeating  the  troops  and  dispersing  the  small 
guard  then  stationed  on  the  herding  ground  the  Indians 
made  their  escape,  taking  about  fifty  head  of  cattle  be- 
longing to  the  people  of  Gunnison.     August  13th  another 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  33 

attack  was  made  ou  Spring  City,  James  Meeks  and  An- 
drew Jobansen  being  killed  and  William  Blain  wounded, 
while  engaged  in  hauling  hay  from  the  meadows.  The 
redskins  started  off  with  all  the  stock  in  sight,  but  were 
so  hotly  pursued  by  the  herders  and  guard,  that  they  left 
most  of  the  cattle  and  were  glad  to  get  away  with  only  a 
few.  On  September  14th  John  Hay  of  Gunnison  was 
killed  by  a  band  of  Indians,  who  found  him  alone  burn- 
ing lime.  Four  days  after  this  murder  the  stock  owned 
by  the  citizens  of  Beaver  Avas  driven  away  by  a  band  of 
Black  Hawk's  waiTiors,  and  the  redskins  decided  to  re- 
main in  their  haunts  until  spring.  But  the  settlements 
were  becoming  too  numerous  for  the  Indians,  and  their 
safety  was  better  assured  by  keeping  back  from  civiliza- 
tion, which  they  wisel}'  concluded  to  do,  making  only 
occasional  sallies  on  travelers  or  driving  off  some  cattle 
when  hungry.  The  year  of  1867  was  a  prosperous  season 
and  large  crops  were  harvested  without  molestation  ex- 
cept from  a  few  straggling  wai-riors,  who  generalh'  re- 
mained in  the  mountains.  Minute  men  were  held  in 
readiness  and  the  guns  were  kept  loaded  in  expectation 
of  an  outbreak  at  any  time.  The  horses  and  cattle  were 
carefully  guarded  and  eveiy  precaution  taken  to  prevent 
any  further  loss  of  lives  or  property. 

In  April,  1868,  a  gold  excitement  caused  many  peo- 
ple to  return  to  the  deserted  settlement  of  Alma,  where 
it  was  reported  immense  quantities  of  gold  had  been  dis- 
covered. The  Indians  attacked  a  company  from  Sanpete, 
on  the  way  to  the  gold  fields,  a  few  miles  north  of  Kich- 
field,  and  killed  Lars  A.  Justesen  and  Charles  Wilson 
and  wounded  Peter  Thompson.  The  company  returned 
to  their  homes,  reporting  no  gold  but  plenty  of  Indians. 
About  twenty-five  miners  remained  for  a  time  until  dis- 
couraged and  frightened  by  the  redmen,  when  they  left, 
thus  deserting  the  town  the  second  time.     On  July  10th 


34  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

a  raid  was  made  on  Ephraim,  and  the  Indians  started 
awaj  with  all  the  stock  obtainable,  but  the  citizens  gave 
chase,  when  a  sharp  engagement  was  had,  the  Indians 
being  forced  to  retreat  and  leave  their  captured  stock. 
The  Indians  held  a  long  pow-wow  among  their  several 
bands,  and  finally  decided  to  make  a  treaty  of  peace  with 
the  white  men.  August  19th  a  treaty  was  concluded  in 
Strawberry  Valley,  and  the  Indians  promised  to  remain 
peaceable.  This,  like  the  usual  Indian  pledge,  was  soon 
violated,  for  one  montli  after  a  raid  was  made  on  Fair- 
view  and  eighteen  horses  driven  away.  The  redskins 
finally  resolved  that  there  was  honor  even  among  thieves, 
and  ceased  hostilities  till  1872,  when,  on  June  16th,  Neils 
Heizelt  was  killed  by  a  band  of  braves,  at  Twelve  Mile 
creek.  The  troops  had  been  withdrawn,  and  under  the 
order  of  Gov.  J.  W.  Shaffer  wea*e  not  permitted  to  muster, 
drill,  or  bear  aims,  except  under  the  direction  of  the 
United  States  Marshal.  This  order  was  issued  Septem- 
ber 15,  1870,  and  the  Federal  authorities  took  up  the  In- 
dian affairs,  resulting  in  a  final  treaty,  consummated  by 
Gen.  Morrow  at  Mount  Pleasant,  September  7,  1872. 

GROWTH  AND  DEVELOPMENT. 

The  Indian  wars  prevented  any  permanent  improve- 
ments being  made  except  under  heavy  guard,  hence  the 
colonists  were  practically  compelled  to  curb  their  ambi- 
tions for  good  homes  and  neat  fanus  until  peace  was 
fully  restored.  In  1865  and  the  following  year  the  grass- 
hoppers came  in  such  numbers  as  to  almost  destroy  all 
the  growing  crops,  causing  hunger  and  privation  in  many 
homes.  The  chickens  and  turkej^s  were  turned  loose  to 
devour  the  pests,  and  every  man  and  boy  able  to  drive 
the  hoppers  was  pressed  into  service.  After  much  trib- 
ulation the  insects  were  forced  into  ditches  and  burned. 

The  first  material  improvement  of  general  benefit  to 


1242411 

HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  36 

all  the  settlements  was  the  completion  of  the  Deseret 
Telegraph  line  through  the  counts^  to  INIanti,  which  was 
celebrated  December  2S,  1866.  This  placed  Sanpete,  the 
acknowledged  "Granary  of  Utah,"  in  direct  communica- 
tion with  the  capital  city,  and  through  that,  the  entire 
commercial  world.  Its  benefits  were  felt  at  once  in  giv- 
ing valuable  information  on  the  prices  of  grain  and  cat- 
tle, thus  advising  the  people  when  to  start  by  team  or  on 
horseback  for  marketing  their  products.  Many  citizens 
of  this  .county  were  among  the  first  stockholders  of  this 
pioneer  telegraph  line,  and  some  yet  own  stock  in  the 
company.  A  few  years  later,  in  the  early  '70s,  the  coun- 
try was  connected  with  the  outside  world  by  the  Sanpete 
Valley  railroad,  extending  from  Nephi  to  Wales.  This 
enterprise  was  started  by  capitalists  in  Salt  Lake  City,  to 
reach  the  pioneer  coal  fields  located  in  1859  by  John  E. 
Eeese,  and  at  the  time  the  road  was  constructed,  the  only 
source  of  coal  supply  in  Utah.  The  road  was  a  narrow 
gauge,  connecting  with  the  standard  gauge  Utah  South- 
ern, but  it  extended  commerce  to  the  oi^en  marts  of  the 
world. 

In  the  spring  of  1871  the  Fairview  Coal  and  Coke 
company  was  incorporated  and  operations  began  on  de- 
veloping another  coal  field,  within  the  borders  of  this 
county.  The  third  coal  mine  was  discovered  in  1887  by 
Henry  Thomas,  in  Six  Mile  canyon,  near  Sterling,  and 
the  following  year  he  and  others  opened  up  a  good  mine, 
which  was  operated  by  a  single  horse  whim,  but  supplied 
all  the  coal  required  for  home  consumption  for  several 
years.  The  Sanpete  Valley  Eailway  company  later  built 
a  road  to  the  mines,  which  they  purchased,  and  have  con- 
structed extensive  hoisting  works  at  the  terminus,  now 
called  Morrison.  Thus  the  coal  deposits  have  been  im- 
portant factors  in  the  growth  and  development  of  the 
county,  and  the  future  of  this  business  will  no  doubt  be  a 


36  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

leading  financial  addition  to  the  commerce  of  central  and 
southern  Utah, 

April  24,  1877,  the  site  for  the  Manti  Temple  was 
dedicated  and  work  began  on  one  of  the  most  imposing 
buildings  of  the  State.  This  was  erected  chiefly  by  the 
donations  of  the  generous  citizens  of  this  county,  and  is  a 
monument  to  eleven  years  prosperity  enjoyed  by  the 
people,  while  it  was  being  constructed.  On  July  4,  1877, 
Sanpete  stake  of  Zion  of  the  Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of 
Latter-Day  Saints  was  organized,  with  Canute  Peterson 
president  and  Henry  Beal  and  John  B.  Maiben  counsel- 
lors. This  marked  the  beginning  of  a  better  era  of  co- 
operation and  union,  as  nearly  all  the  people  were  mem- 
bers of  that  church,  and  every  effort  possible  was  ad- 
vanced for  the  building  up  of  a  colonial  granary  the 
equal  of  which  could  not  be  found  within  the  confines  of 
a  similar  sized  mountain-walled  valley  throughout  the 
great  new  West. 

During  the  yeai*s  of  1890-91  the  Rio  Grande  Western 
railway  was  extended  through  the  entire  county  from 
north  to  south,  connecting  all  of  the  prominent  cities  and 
towns,  and  adding  over  sixty  miles  to  the  railroad  track- 
age in  the  county.  Two  years  later  the  Sanpete  Valley 
was  extended  to  Morrison  and  made  a  standard  gauge. 
These  roads  furnished  employment  to  many  citizens  and 
opened  a  market  for  ties  and  timbers,  thus  stimulating 
the  lumber-making  industiy  until  the  vast  forests  of  the 
canyons  were  partially  utilized  in  the  rapid  accumulation 
of  homes  and  property  for  w^hich  the  county  is  noted  far 
and  near,  wherever  its  people  are  known.  The  railroads 
opened  the  dormant  channels  of  trade,  established  new 
telegraphic  service  and  express  delivery,  and  placed 
every  colony  of  the  connty  on  the  great  highway  of  com- 
mercial prosperity. 

The  political  histoiy  of  Sanpete  in  early  days  is  the 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  37 

same  as  in  other  counties,  in  that  the  People's  Party  was 
in  the  ascendency,  there  being  practically  no  opposition. 
In  1891,  when  the  national  parties  were  organized  and 
local  issues  discarded,  Sanpete  elected  Democratic  can- 
didates. This  party  continued  in  power  until  1894,  when 
the  Republican  ticket  was  elected,  and  for  two  years  the 
county  was  marked  in  the  Eepublican  column.  At  this 
election  seven  delegates  were  selected  by  popular  vote  to 
assist  in  framing  a  Constitution  for  the  proposed  new 
State  of  Utah.  Those  elected  as  delegates  to  the  Consti- 
tutional Convention  were  Hon.  C.  P.  Larsen  of  Manti, 
Hon.  J.  D.  Page  of  Mount  Pleasant,  Hon.  Lauritz  Larsen 
of  Spring  City,  Hon.  A.  C.  Lund  of  Ephraim,  Hon.  Parley 
Christiansen  of  Mayfield,  Han.  James  C.  Peterson  of  Fair- 
view,  and  Joseph  Jolley  of  Moroni. 

January  4,  1896,  President  Grover  Cleveland  issued 
a  proclamation  in  accordance  with  an  act  of  Congress, 
admitting  Utah  to  the  Union  as  the  forty-fifth  State.  The 
first  Legislative  Assembly  under  Statehood  had  three 
representatives  from  Sanpete  county,  Hon.  W.  D.  Cand- 
land  of  Mount  Pleasant  being  in  the  Senate  and  Hon. 
John  Lowry  of  Manti  and  Hon.  Peter  Thompson  of 
Ephraim  in  the  lower  house.  They  were  elected  by  the 
Eepublican  party.  At  the  general  election  held  in  No- 
vember, 1896,  the  entire  State  and  county  ofiflcial  ticket 
was  Democratic,  hence  the  present  administration,  with 
the  exception  of  District  Judge  and  County  Superintend- 
ent of  Schools,  is  under  the  control  of  Democracy.  No 
third  party  has  yet  succeeded  in  the  county,  which  under 
the  present  law  of  equal  suffrage  has  about  6,000  voters. 
Local  political  histoiy  contains  no  exciting  periods  ex- 
cept the  temporaiy  removal  of  the  county  seat  to  Moroni 
in  1863,  and  subsequent  return  to  Manti. 

The  present  county  officials  are  as  follows: 
District  Judge — Jacob  Johnson,  Spring  City. 


38  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Commissioners — Peter  Greaves,  Sr.,  Ephraim;  Peter 
Sundwall,  Fairview;  J.  A.  Tuft,   Gunnison. 

Assessor — Alvin  E.  Allred,  Chester. 

Clerk^M.  F.  Muri'ay,  Ephraim. 

Sheriff — Joseph  Judd,  Manti. 

Recorder — Amasa  Aldrieh,  Mt.  Pleasant. 

Quarantine  Physician — W.  H.  Olsten,  Manti. 

Superintendent  of  Schools — A.  C.  Nelson,  Manti. 

Prosecuting-  Attorney — William  K.  Eeid,  Manti. 

Treasurer —IMons  Monson,  jMoroni. 

Surveyor — J.  H.  Hougaard,  Manti. 

State  Senator — J.  F.  Allred,  Spring  City. 

Members  of  the  House — Aaron  Hardy,  Moroni  and 
N.  (\  Sorenson,  Gunnison. 

The  attorneys  of  the  county  have  been  few  until  re- 
cent years.  The  list  at  present  consists  as  follows:  W. 
K.  Peid,  James  Chc^riy,  W.  D.  Livingston  and  E.  W. 
Tatlock,  Manti;  Ferdinand  Ericksen,  Soren  X.  Christen- 
sen,  A.  G.  Sutherland,  Robert  Anderson  and  W.  E.  White 
,of  Mt.  Pleasant. 

Sanpete  is  an  agiicultural  county,  a  land  of  small 
holdings  in  farm  property'  and  a  fertile  valley,  justly  and 
indisputably  entitled  to  the  name  given  by  that  honored 
western  pioneer.  President  Brigham  Young,  "The 
Granary  of  Utah."  The  county  has  1540  individ- 
ual, well-tilled  farms,  made  up  chiefly  of  small  areas, 
containing  an  aggregate  of  35,000  acres,  wliich,  with 
25,000  acres  of  hay  meadows,  from  which  annual  har- 
vests are  secured,  make  60,000  acres  improved,  with,  an 
outside  acreage  in  its  native  state,  susceptible  to  reclam- 
ation, through  additional  irrigation  ditches,  of  almost 
50,000  acres.  The  annual  wheat  yield  averages  over 
one-half  million  bushels,  much  of  which  is  exported 
either  as  grain  or  flour,  the  cash  returns  being  used  in 
building  up  the  county  and  beautifying  the  homes.    The 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  39 

yield  of  oats,  barley  and  lye  reaches  one-quarter  million 
bushels  yearly,  the  grain  being  marketed  or  fed  to  home 
animals. 

In  the  production  of  wool  and  mutton  this  county 
leads,  not  only  in  Utah,  but  the  entire  United  States,  no 
other  county  having  so  many  as  a  half  million  sheep,  the 
property  of  the  most  representative  and  influential  citi- 
zens. The  average  wool  clip  ranges  about  3,000,000 
pounds  annually  and  the  shipments  of  mutton  sheep  are 
many  trainloads  efvery  year.  The  sheep  are  mostly  well- 
bred  Merinos  and  Cotswolds  and  yield  immense  revenues 
to  the  wealthy  flockmasters.  Stockraising  has  always 
been  one  of  the  leading  industries,  there  being  at  present 
over  15,000  range  cattle  and  milch  cows  owned  by  the 
several  farmers  and  stockmen.  The  best  breeds  of  Dur- 
ham, Herefords  and  other  first-class  animals  are  fed  and 
kept  on  the  ranges,  and  Sanpete  cattle  are  in  demand 
on  all  the  Western  markets.  The  dairy  and  creamery 
interests  ai^e  increasing  every  year  as  the  market  re- 
quirements for  Sanpete  butter  and  cheese  are  greater 
than  the  supply. 

Eecent  analyses  of  soil  and  sugar  beets  grown  in  this 
county  show  the  superiority  of  natural  facilities  for  pro- 
ducing the  highest  testing  beets.  With  the  stimulus  now 
given  the  sugar  industiy,  there  is  no  doubt  that  within 
a  few  3'ears  the  largest  and  most  profitable  factory  for 
making  sug^ar,  molasses  and  other  necessities  from,  sac- 
charine producing  beets  will  be  erected  in  Sanpete.  This 
will  bring  about  an  era  of  smaller  farms,  closer  cultiva- 
tion and  greater  yields  and  make  of  this  valley  the  farm- 
er's paradise.  The  annual  potato  yield  is  about  100,000 
bushels,  of  excellent  quality,  saleable  on  all  the  Western 
mai'kets  and  in  great  demand  even  where  other  potatoes 
are  not  wanted.  The  future  of  potato-growing  in  this 
county  cannot  be  readilj^  contemplated  by  those  unac- 


40  HISTOUY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

quainted  with  tbe  natural  advantages.  Many  thousand 
acres  could  be  planted  with  protit  and  in  addition  to  sup- 
XJlying  the  outside  market,  a  mammoth  starch  factoiy 
is  among  the  numerous  prospective  industries  that  could 
be  erected  and  supported  in  the  county. 

The  county  has  never  been  considered  a  fruit-grow- 
ing region,  but  there  are  about  500  acres  planted  to 
various  trees  and  vines,  the  yield  reaching  over  18,000 
bushels  yearly.  Some  of  the  most  extensive  apiarists  in 
Utah  are  located  in  Sanpete,  there  being  over  2000  hives 
of  bees  owned,  and  the  annual  output  of  honey  reaching 
almost  thirty-flve  tons.  The  growing  of  fruit  and  bees 
increases  ever-y  year  and  soon  this  county  will  be  entitled 
to  tlio  additional  cogn(^meu  "the  land  of  fruit  and  lioney." 
The  rich  alfalfa  grows  luxuriantly  e'verywhere,  feeding 
the  bees  and  furnishing  nearly  50,000  tons  of  hay  an- 
nually. In  addition  to  the  alfalfa  hay  fully  15,000  tons 
of  wild  hay  are  haiwested  every  year,  and  used  chiefly  in 
feeding  5000  milch  cows,  6000  horses  and  other  domestic 
farm  animals  used  as  the  servants  of  the  industrious  and 
frugal   citizens. 

All  agricultural  lands  in  the  county  require  irriga- 
tion to  produce  crops,  hence  this  modern  science  has  been 
thoroughly  developed  by  the  Sanpete  pioneers.  The  co- 
operative or  community  plan  was  practiced  in  early 
days,  all  farming  one  field  and  every  man  assisting  in 
constructing  and  maintaining  the  canals  and  ditches. 
Water  was  taken  from  the  several  mountain  streams  by 
gravity  courses,  Avitli  but  little  expense  except  labor,  and 
distributed  equally,  according  to  the  area  cultivated. 
Since  the  passage  of  the  general  incorporation  act  of 
1S84,  there  have  been  thirtj^-one  canal  and  ditch  com- 
panies incorporated  in  this  county,  having  an  aggregate 
of  11,645,130  as  capital  stock.  A  majority  of  the  com- 
panies consist  of  the  citizens  of  the  towns  where  ditches 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  41 

are  located,  and  consequentlv  are  performing-  the  work 
for  which  they  were  incorporated.  A  few  are  as  yet  un- 
developed, but  in  the  course  of  time  will  be  important 
factors  in  building  up  the  agricultural  interests  of  the 
entire  valley. 

Sanpete  is  an  agricultural  county  in  every  sense  of 
the  term,  and  has  no  large  manufacturing  plants,  but 
there  are  ninety  individual  concerns  in  active  operation, 
using  1056  horse-power,  employing  -468  persons  and  hav- 
ing an  output  of  over  one-quarter  million  dollars  annu- 
ally. Many  enterprises  may  be  added,  and  there  is  no 
doubt  but  the  time  is  not  far  distant  when  the  natural 
resources  will  be  developed  more  thoroughly  and  woolen 
mills,  sugar  factories,  grain  elevators,  starch  factories, 
cereal  mills,  paper  mills,  sanitariums,  summer  resorts 
and  other  money-producing  organizations  be  effected. 
The  county  has  large  deposits  of  coal,  unsurpassed  water 
power,  best  transportation  facilities,  superior  climate 
and  all  other  natural  inducements  for  creating  all  the 
factories  named  and  many  more  similar  institutions.  The 
county  has  no  indebtedness,  and  the  property  valuation 
is  about  five  million  dollars.  There  are  eighty-eight 
stores  doing  good  business,  employing  115  persons  and 
disbursing  $50,000  annually  in  wages. 

The  official  Territorial  Bureau  of  Statistics  for  1895, 
being  the  latest  report  on  the  number  of  inhabitants  in 
this  county,  is  quoted  as  published.  Since  that  date  the 
population  of  each  place  mentioned  has  advanced  mater- 
ially, so  that  18,000  is  a  fair  estimate  of  the  present  num- 
ber of  people.  The  county  hanl  in  1895  a  total  of  15,538 
people,  distributed  among  the  fifteen  cities,  towns  and 
villages  as  follows: 

Chester  280,  Ephraim  2213,  Fayette  251,  Fountain 
Green  929,  Indianola  136,  Gunnison  1367,  Manti  2328, 
Mayfield  516,  Milburn  223,  Moroni  1406,  Mt.     Pleasant 

3 


42  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

24 SI,  Spring  City  1226,  Sterling  347,  Fairy iew  1494, 
ATales  305. 

The  following  places  are  incorporated  cities:  Epli- 
raim,  Fairview,  Manti,  Moroni,  Mt.  Pleasant  and  Spring 
City.    The  towns  are  Fountain  Green  and  Gunnison. 

April  24,  1885,  the  first  newspaper  was  published  in 
Sanpete  countA'.  The  paper  was  called  the  Home  Senti- 
nel, and  was  issued  from  Manti,  James  T.  Jakeman  be- 
ing editor  and  publisher.  This  paper  was  i)ublished  for 
several  years  by  various  parties,  and  finally  suspended  in 
1895,  AVard  Stevenson  being  the  last  editor.  In  June, 
1890,  the  County  Kegister  was  issued  at  Ephraim  by 
James  T.  Jakeman.  Aftei*  some  years  the  plant  was  sold 
to  M.  F.  INIurray,  who  now  conducts  the  Enterprise.  In 
Is'ovember,  1890,  the  Pyramid  was  started  at  Mt.  Plea- 
sant by  A.  r>.  AVilliams.  The  paper  is  still  numbered 
among  the  enterprising  county  publications,  being  inib- 
lished  by  J.  M.  l^oyden.  October  13,  1893,  the  Messenger 
was  first  issued  at  Manti,  Joel  Shomaker  being  the  edi- 
tor. This  publication  is  now  under  the  management  of 
P.  A.  Poulsdu.  Jn  June,  1898,  the  Sani)ete  Democrat  was 
started  at  Manti  by  L.  A.  Lauber. 

The  Sanpete  Valley  railway,  the  pioneer  road  of  this 
county,  length  fifty-one  miles,  connects  with  the  Oregon 
Short  Line  at  Neplii  and  extends  through  Juab  and  San- 
pete counties  to  ^Morrison.  This  road  was  surveyed  and 
partly  graded  in  the  TO's  by  residents  of  Salt  Lake  City, 
then  sold  to  an  English  syndicate,  Avho  constructed  the 
line  to  Wales  in  1881  to  tap  the  first  coal  beds  opened  in 
the  Territory.  The  coal  not  possessing  sufficient  com- 
mercial value  to  pay  high  prices  for  mining  and  expense 
of  long  freight  hauls,  the  mines  were  abandoned,  and  in 
1884  the  track  from  Draper  to  Wales  was  taken  up,  a 
new  grade  made  to  ]\Ioroni,  thence  to  Chester,  Avhich  was 
the  terminus  till  1893.    Theodore  Bruback,  the  president, 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  48 

succeeded  in  reorganizing  the  company  and  placing  it  on 
a  sound  financial  basis,  after  which  the  road  was  ex- 
tended to  Manti,  reaching  that  city  on  Thanksgiving 
day,  1893. 

In  1894  the  road  was  extended  to  Morrison,  its  pres- 
ent terminus,  and  in  1896  the  gauge  was  changed  from 
narrow  to  standard.  The  charter  has  been  amended  to 
allow  the  constiiiction  of  an  extension  southwest 
through  Cedar  City  to  the  Nevada  line,  and  work  will 
begin  on  this  in  the  near  future.  The  general  offices  of 
the  company  are  in  the  ^McCornick  Block,  Salt  Lake  City, 
Theodore  Bruback  president  and  general  manager,  S.  T. 
Pearson,  secretary  and  treasurer.  Local  headquarters, 
Manti;  H.  S.  Kerr,  general  superintendent  and  general 
freight  and  passenger  agent.  The  policy  of  the  company 
is  to  employ  local  men  to  the  exclusion  of  transients.  The 
good  service,  courteous  ti-eatment  and  satisfactory  man- 
agement gives  this  road  its  share  of  the  local  and 
through  fmght  and  passenger  traffic.  A  direct  connec- 
tion with  the  Oregon  Shoi-t.  Line  at  Xeplii  makes  a 
through  line  from  Salt  Lake  City  to  ^lanti,  and  business 
from  and  to  Eastern  points  is  interchanged  with  the 
Union  Pacific  at  Ogden.  At  Morrison  terminus  are 
located  the  extensive  coal  mines  of  the  Sterling  Coal  and 
Coke  company. 

The  Sevier  A^alley  branch  of  the  Kio  Grande  West- 
ern railway  was  begun  at  Thistle  in  June,  1890,  and  com- 
pleted to  Manti,  a  distance  of  sixty  miles,  and  opened  for 
tralfic  January  1,  1891.  The  line  was  extended  through 
the  county  to  Salina  during  the  year  '91,  many  residents 
of  the  county  being  employed  in  grading  and  furnishing 
ties  and  timbers.  In  '96  the  road  was  continued  to 
Belknap,  in  Sevier  Valley,  and  the  line  as  contemplated 
will  probably  continue  through  Utah  and  to  the  coast, 
making  Sanpete  Valley  the  most    direct    route    to    the 


44  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Pacific  ocean.  This  road  is  well  equipped  with  modern 
coaches  and  shipping  facilities  and  carries  an  immense 
tonnage  of  sheep,  cattle,  wool  and  grain  from  Sanpete 
every  year,  bringing  in  merchandise  and  other  articles  of 
commerce.  The  company  furnishes  first-class  service  in 
every  particular,  with  obliging  agents  and  enterprising 
officials,  ever  on  the  alert  for  the  comfort  and  safety  of 
its  patrons.  It  is  distinctly  a  Utah  road,  Avith  the  main 
line  and  branches  connecting  all  important  points  in  the 
highway  of  commercial  activity.    The  officers  are: 

William  J.  Palmer,  president;  George  F.  Peabody, 
vice-president;  D.  C.  Dodge,  general  manager;  A.  E. 
Wei  by,  general  superintendent;  S.  H.  Babcock,  traffic 
manager,  and  F.  A.  Wadleigh,  general  passenger  agent, 
with  offices  at  Salt  Lake  City. 


COUNTY   COURTHOUSE. 


COUNTY    POOR-FARM. 


SANPETE    CHRONOLOGY. 


1849. 

June  14.  Chief  Walker  applied  to  President  Young 
for  Colonists  to  settle  Sanpete  Valley. 

August  4.  Joseph  Horn,  W.  W.  Phelps,  Ira  Willes 
and  D.  B.  Huntington  left  Salt  Lake  City  to  explore  San- 
pete. 

August  20.  The  exploring  party  aiTived  at  the 
present  site  of  Manti,  being  royally  received  by  the  San- 
pitch  Indians. 

Nov.  20.  A  company  of  about  fifty  families,  under 
the  direction  of  Setli  Taft,  Isaac  Morley  and  ('harles 
Shumway,  located  Manti. 

November  20.  Almeda,  ^daughter  of  Abram  and 
Clarinda  Washburn,  was  born  at  Manti,  being  the  first 
white  child  born  in  Sanpete  A'alley. 

December  24.  Snow  began  falling  and  continued 
until  it  was  over  three  feet  on  the  level,  the  deepest  ever 
known  in  the  Valley. 

1850. 

January.  Chief  Tabinan  found  a  white  man,  naked 
and  almost  starved,  across  the  Sanpitch  from  Manti.  He 
proved  to  be  one  of  the  party  sent  to  Salt  Lake  City  after 
provisions. 

May.  The  Manti  colonists  were  attacked  by  rattle- 
snakes. The  reptiles  were  so  numerous  that  500  were 
killed  in  one  night. 

June.  Of  the  240  head  of  cattle  brought  in  to  Manti 
only  113  were  alive  this  month,  the  others  having  died 
from  cold  and  hunger. 


48  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

July  1.  Oliief  Walker  and  band  of  700  wai'riors 
pitched  camp  in  a  semi-circle  'round  the  colonists  and  re- 
mained during-  the  year. 

July  5.  President  Brigham  Young  visited  the  val- 
ley and  named  the  settlement  Manti  and  the  County 
Sanpete. 

Septembei*.  The  first  school  was  opened  in  Manti 
by  Jesse  W.  Fox,  and  later  taught  by  Mrs.  Mary  Whit- 
ing. 

September.  The  first  grist  mill  was  erected  by  Phin- 
eas  W.  Cook,  being  the  pi-opei'ty  of  Brigham  Young  and 
Issac  Morley. 

1851. 

Fobruaiy  6.  Manti  was  made  a  city,  by  act  of  the 
legislatm^. 

April  13.  The  first  city  election  was  held  and  Dan 
Jones  elected  Mayor,  with  four  aldennen  and  nine  coun- 
cillors. 

April  .'>0.  I'resident  Brigham  Yonug  visited  Manti 
and  organized  a  High  Council. 

]May.  Isaac  Behunnin,  who  had  attemi)ted  to  settle 
on  the  site  of  Ephraim,  had  to  abandon  the  place  through 
fear  of  Indians. 

May.  Jesse  W.  Fox  sui'veyed  the  site  for  Manti 
City. 

June.  John  Lowry,  Sr.,  appointed  presiding  bishop 
of  Sanpete. 

December.  Isiiac  .Morlcv  and  Charles  Shumway 
represented  Sanpete  in  the  legislature. 

1852. 

Feb.  3.  A  bill  passed  the  legislature  creating  San- 
pete County. 

Feb.  5.  Gov.  Brigham  Young  appointed  George 
Peacock  as  Probate  Judge  of  Sanpete  County. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  49 

March.  Sanpete  County  was  organized,  with  a  full 
set  of  officials. 

March  22.  James  Allred  and  families  settled  Spring 
City. 

Xoyember.  Pedro'  Leon  and  a  company  of  Span- 
iards aiTevsted  at  Xephi  for  selling'  Indians  as  slayes. 
1'hey  Ayere  trie^d  at  Manti  and  ordered  to  leaye. 

1853. 

Mai'ch.  A  company  under  M.  I).  Hamilton  located 
at  ]Mt.  Pleasant  and  built  a  sawmill. 

April.  A  postoffice  was  established  at  Manti,  with 
George  Peacock  po«^tmaste^. 

July  18.  Alex  Keel  killed  at  Payson,  by  AiTopine, 
and  the  Walker  war  began. 

July  19.  Guard  was  fired  upon,  by  Indians,  at  Ham- 
ilton's mill,  east  of  Mt.  Pleasant. 

July  23.  Battle  bet^^en  the  Utah  county  militia, 
under  ( *apt.  P.  \Y.  Coiioyer  and  Indians  at  Mt,  Pleasant, 
Six  Indians  were  killed  a.nd  the  settlers  remoyed  to  the 
fort  at  Spnug  City. 

August  2.  Indians  attacked  Spring  City  and  droye 
away  cattle  and  horses.  The  next  day  the  colonists  were 
remoyed  to  Manti. 

October  1.  John  E.  Warner  and  William  Mills 
killed  by  Indians,  at  Manti. 

October'  3.  James  Nelson,  William  Luke,  William 
Reid  and  T.  F.  Clark,  killed  by  Indians  at  Uinta  Springs, 
while  en  route  to  Salt  Lake  City. 

October  5.  A  census  of  Sanpete  showed  the  popula- 
tion consisted  of  765  people,  of  whom  118  wea'e  the  Mt. 
Pleasant  and  Spring  City  Colonists. 

November  G.  ("hase's  sawmill  was  burned  by  In- 
dians. 

November  10.     Stone  fort  at  Manti  was  completed 


50  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

and  all  the  residents  of  Sanpete  county  took  refuge  in- 
side the  walls. 

December.  A  severe  winter  and  little  provisions  on 
account  of  the  "grasshopper  war,"  caused  economical 
handling  of  supplies,  but  no  real  suffering. 

1854. 

January  6.  AUred's  fort  and  settlement  at  Spring 
City  was  burned  by  Indians. 

Feb.  4.  Ephraim  was  settled  by  E.  N.  Allred  and 
others  who  had  remained  in  Manti  fort  during  the 
"\\inter. 

May.  President  Brigham  Young  made  a  treaty  with 
the  Indians. 

July  5.  Grasshoppers  attack  the  fields  of  Manti  and 
Ephraim,  causing  much  damage  to  growing  crops. 

October.  A  fort  was  completed  at  Ephraim  and  set- 
tlers built  liouses  inside  the  enclosure. 

1855. 

Jan.  20.  Walker,  the  Indian  Chief,  died  at  Meadow 
C^'eek,  in  Millard  county. 

May.  Arropine  deeded  all  of  Sanpete  county  to 
Brigham  Young,  trustee  in  trust  for  the  Church  of  Jesus 
Christ  of  Latter-day  Saints. 

May  21.  A.  N.  Billings  and  forty  men  sent  to  Elk 
Mountains  to  build  a  fort  and  educate  the  Indians. 

September  23.  The  Elk  Mountain  colony  at  Mor- 
mon Fort  was  attacked  by  Indians,  and  James  W.  Hunt, 
William  Behunnin  and  Edward  Edwards  were  killed 
and  A.  N.  Billings  was  wounded. 

September  24.  Elk  Mountain  colonists  started  on 
the  return  trip  to  Manti. 

September  30.    Elk  Mountain  settlers  reach  Manti. 

December.   The  colonies  of  Manti  and  Ephraim  have 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  51 

another  hard  winter,  on  acconnit  of  girasshoppei's  having 
destroyed  crops. 

1856. 

March  17.  Convention  met  in  Salt  Lake  City  to 
form  a  constitutioni  for  a  State,  Sanpete  county  being 
represented. 

September  26.  The  first  hand  cart  company,  in 
vvhich  were  several  who  became  residents  of  Sanpete 
county,  arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City. 

December.  Snow  fell  to  a  great  depth  in  the  moun- 
tains and  throughout  the  valley. 

1857. 

May  15.  The  47th  Quoimm  of  Seventies  was  organ- 
ized at  Ephraim. 

May  16.  The  48th  Quorum  of  Seventies  organized 
at  Manti.  Daniel  Henrie  was  appointed  president. 

Sept.  15.  Utah  was  declared  under  militaiy  law, 
militia  ordered  to  Echo  canyon  to  intercept  the  troops. 

December.  A  general  jubilee  prevailed  throughout 
Sanpete  because  of  excellent  crops  having  been  har- 
v^-ted. 

December.  Bishop  John  E.  Eeese  and  Indian  Chief 
Tabinan  discovered  the  coal  ledge  at  Wales. 

1858. 

March.  James  Miller  and  George  M.  Bright  were 
killed  by  Indians  at  Salmon  River,  and  the  settlement 
abandoned. 

June  4.  Niels  Jorgensen  and  wife,  Jens  Turkelsen 
and  Christian  E.  Kjerluf  were  killed  by  Indians,  in  Salt 
Creek  canyon. 

July.  Residents  of  Utah  county  who  had  removed 
south  on  the  approach  of  Johnson's  army  returned  to 
tlieir  homes. 


52  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

October  5.  Samuel  Brown  and  Josiali  Call  were 
killed  by  Indians  on  Chicken  Qi'eek. 

1859. 

March.  Mt.  Pleasant  Avas  i-esettled  by  James  Ivie, 
W.  S.  Seeiy,  David  Jones,  Isaac  Allied  and  others. 

March  15.  ^Moroni  settled  by  Bishoi>  George  W. 
Bradley,  I.  Woolf,  Isaac  :\l<.rl('y,  II.  Gnstiu,  G.  H.  Brad- 
ley and  N.  L.  Chiistciison. 

March.  SpHng  City  i-esettled  and  called  "Little 
Denmark,"  Bishop  C.  G.  Larseni  being  one  of  the  leading 
men. 

March.  (iuimis(»ii  scttl<Ml  by  l>isli(»]»  Jacob  Ilntchin- 
son  and  coni]»aiiy. 

^larch.  Bislioj)  .I(»liii  K.  Keese,  Jolin  H.  Price, 
Thomas  Canii)bell,  Moses  Gilford  and  others  settled  at 
A^'ales  and  opened  the  coal  mines. 

July  14.  George  W.  Bradley  ordained  bishop  of  Mo- 
roni. 

July.  Fonnlain  Giyh^u  was  located  by  George  W. 
Johnson. 

August.  George  W.  Johnson,  James  S.  Holman, 
Christian  Ottosen  and  others  settled  at  Fountain  Green. 

October.  Fairview  was  settled  by  James  H.  Jones, 
Lindsay  A.  Brady,  Jehu  Cox,  Isaac  Y.  Vance  and  others, 
wJio  built  a  fort. 

ISGO. 

April.  Ephraim  residents  left  the  fort  and  erected 
homes  on  their  city  lots. 

May  4.  Levi  Gilford,  a  member  of  the  Monnon  Bat- 
talion, died  at  Moroni. 

Aug.  7.  James  Hanahin,  a.  deserter  from  the  United 
States  army,  was  killed  by  an  Indian,  near  Manti. 

Dec,  4.    Chief  Arropine  died  in  Sevier  county. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  58 

1861. 

April  26.  Two  liimclred  wagons  with  four  yoke  of 
cattle  each,  haulino-  about  15,000  pounds  of  flour,  started 
for  the  Missouri  river  after  poor  emigrants.  Some  of 
the  company  were  residents  of  Sanpetei  county. 

Beptember.  Several  peojile  were  sent  from  Sanpete 
and  norihern  counties  tO'  settle  St.  George  and  the  Eio 
A'irgin  and  Santa  Clara  ri^-er  valleys. 

1862. 

JanuaiT  22.  A  constitution  was  adopted  for  the 
State  of  De'seret,  Sanpete  being  represented  in  the  con- 
vention. 

May  21.  Two  hundi'ed  and  sixty-two  wagons,  293 
teamst/ersi  and  2880  oxen,  carrying  113,315  pounds  of 
flour,  sent  from  Utah  toi  assist  poor  emigTants.  Some 
of  Sanpete's  citizens  were  among  those  going  and  com- 
ing. 

November  21.  The  66th  Quorum  of  Seventies  was 
organized  at  ^It.  Pleasant,  with  Levi  B.  Reynolds  as 
president. 

1863. 

March.  The  county  seat  was  removed  from  Manti 
to  Moroni  and  George  W.  Bradley  appointed  Probate 
Judge.  Judge  W.  F.  Maylett  purchased  the  county  jail 
for  1350. 

April  5.  Battle  in  Spanish  Fork  canyon,  between 
140  cavaliy,  undei'  Col.  G.  S.  Evans,  and  200  Indians. 
Lieut.  F.  A.  Teale  was  killed  and  Indians  defeated. 

May  18.  Three  hundred  and  eighty-four  wagons, 
488  teamsters,  some  from  Sanpete,  and  3604  oxen,  started 
for  the  Missouri  river,  taking  225,969  pounds  of  flour, 
to  aid  poor  emigTants.  This  company  took  4300  pounds 
^  f  Utah  cotton  for  sale. 


54  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

1864. 

January.  Oountv  seat  I'emoved  to  Manti  and  Hon. 
"^A'.  F.  Maylett  appointed  Probate  Judge. 

March.  A  party  of  Epliraim  colonists  settled  at  Cir- 
cleville  in  Piute  county. 

May.  The  Pei'petual  Eniioration  company  sent  170 
wagons,  1,717  oxen  and  277  men  to  the  Missouri  river 
after  emigrants. 

July  17.  Sanpete  flour  sold  in  Salt  Lake  City  for 
§■•21.25  per  100  pounds. 

November  10.  George  Peacock  and  30"othei*s  fix)m 
Sani)ete  county  began  a  settlement  at  Alma,  on  the  Se- 
vier river,  wliicli  Avas  soon  abandoned. 

1865. 

Jan.  11).  Hon.  (l(M)igo  Peacock  Avas  elected  Pixjbate 
J  iidge  of  Sanpete. 

January.  Sevier  and  Piut«^  coiinties  were  organized, 
being  settled  by  residents  of  Sanpete. 

April  2.  Sanpete  citizens  were  solicited  for  sub- 
scriptions to  build  the'Deseret  TelegTaph  line.  Several 
thousand  dollars  was  subscribed  in  money,  poles  and 
labor. 

April  0.  John  Lowry  had  a  quanel  with  Indian 
Chief  Jake,  in  Manti,  which  act  the  Indians  claim 
bi'ought  on  the  Black  Hawk  war. 

April  10.  Peter  Ludvigsen  was  killed  by  a  band  of 
Indians,  while  collecting  stock  on  Tw^elve-Mile  creek. 

April  11.  Elijah  B.  Ward  and  James  Anderson  were 
killed  and  scalped  hj  Indians  in  Salina  can^-on. 

April  12.  Col.  R.  N.  Allred  with  84  men  defeated 
by  Indians  in  a  battle  in  Salina  canyon.  Jens  Sorenson 
of  Ephraim  and  William  Kearnes  of  Gunnison  were 
killed. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  55 

May  25.  Jens  Larsen  was  killed  by  Indians,  four 
miles  north  of  Fairyiew. 

May  26.  John  Given,  wife  and  four  children  were 
killed  by  Indians  in  Thistle  Valley, 

May  29.  David  H.  Jones  was  killed  by  Indians, 
near  Fairview. 

June  24.    Isaac  Morley  died  at  Fairview. 

Jnly  7-19.  Brigham  Young'  visited  Sanpete  to  inves- 
tigate the  Indian  troubles. 

July  15.  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow  was  put  in  command  of 
tlie  Sanpete  military  district  and  ordered  against  the 
Indians. 

July  18.  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow  and  command  engaged 
the  Indians  in  battle  in  Grass  valley.  Twelve  Indians 
w  ere  killed  and  one  white  man  wounded. 

July  26.  Indians  attacked  Glenwood,  killed  two 
horses  and  wounded  one  of  the  settlers. 

Sept.  21.  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow  and  command  defeated 
the  Indians  at  Fish  Lake.  Seven  Indians  wei'e  killed 
and  Gen.  Snow  and  two  men  wounded. 

October  8.  The  first  issue  of  the  Deseret  News  semi- 
^^  eekly  was  published  at  Salt  Lake  City. 

Oct.  IT.  Indians  attacked  Ephraim,  killing  Morten 
P.  Kuhr  and  wife,  Elizabeth  Peterson,  William  Thorpe, 
Soren  N.  Jespersen,  Benjamin  J.  Black  and  William  T. 
Hill. 

Nov.  6.  Indians  raided  the  settlement  of  Circleville, 
killing  three  men. 

December.  Hon.  W.  F.  Maylett  served  as  Probate 
Judge  of  Sanpete  this  year. 

1866. 

Jan.  1.  The  first  number  of  the  Juvenile  Insti'uctor 
^vas  issued  at  Salt  Lake  City,  with  George  Q.  Cannon  as 
editor. 


56  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNT  i'. 

Jan.  10.  Boiinclaiy  lines  of  Sanpete  county  defined 
by  act  of  the  legislatui'e. 

Jan.  17.    Moroni  wasi  incorporated  as  a  city. 

Feb.  5.  Indians  raided  Wasihington  and  Kane  coun- 
ties, killing  Doctor  Wliitmer,  a  son  of  John  M.  Moody's, 
Peter  Shirts,  and  others. 

Ma.rcli  12.  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow  arreisteil  nine  Indians, 
including  Chiefs  Sanpitch  and  Ankawakets,  at  Nephi, 
and  placed  them  in  jail  at  Manti.  Four  were  tried  and 
shot,  by  order  of  the  chiefs,  for  complicity  in  the  several 
raids  on  white  settlers. 

April  2.  Indians  raided  Salina,  killing  thi-ee  per- 
sons, wounding  one  and  driving  away  all  the  cattle. 

April  14.  Indians  imprisoned  at  IManti  broke  jail, 
three  were  shot  by  the  guard  and  tlie  othei's  pursued  to 
>,ebo  and  killed. 

April  IS.  Chief  Sanpitch  was  kilh^l  by  a  povsse  in 
pursuit  of  him  for  breaking  jail,  wliilo  in  liiding  nortli  of 
Moroni. 

April  21.  Salina  was  abandoned  and  the  settlei*s 
tt>ok  refuge  in  Sanpete  colonies. 

April  22.  Thomas  Jones  was  killed  and  William 
Ivoiw  wounded  by  Indians,  while  on  guard  at  Fairview. 

April  25.  Indians  attacked  the  settlement  of  ]MaiTS- 
vale,  killing  Albert  Lewis  and  wounding  another  man. 

April  29.  Andrew  Petei'son  was  killed  and  Thomas 
Davey  wounded  by  Indians,  near  Faiiwiew. 

May  1.  Residents  of  small  settlements  in  Sanpete, 
Piute  and  Sevier  counties  were  counselled  by  President 
Brigham  Young  to  collect  in  bodies  of  not  less  than  150 
fls  a  protection  against  Indian  attacks. 

]May  6.  Col.  Heber  P.  Kimball  and  a  company  of 
50  men  arrived  in  Manti  to  assist  the  settler-s  in  fighting 
Indians. 

May  6.     Capt.  P.  W.  Conover  and  fifty  men  arrived 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  57 

in  Manti  and  iTported  to  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow  for  detail 
aj>ainst  Indians. 

May  14.  Col.  W.  B.  Pace  took  charge  of  the  men 
from  Utah  conntv. 

June  10.  Indians  attacked  Eound  Valley,  killed 
•fames  lyie  and  a  boy  and  drove  away  the  cattle. 

June  11.  Col.  W.  B.  Pace  and  25  men  intercepted 
the  Indians  at  Gravelly  Ford,  on  the  Sevier,  and  had  a 
three  hours'  battle,  in  which  each  man  fired  thirty  rounds 
of  ammunition.  Several  Indians  wei^e  killed  and  one 
nliite  man  wounded. 

June  20.  Gen.  D.  H.  Wells  took  command  of  the 
'^ntire  forces  against  the  Indians. 

June  23.  James  Ivie,  Jr.,  killed  a  friendly  Indian 
in  retaliation  for  the  murder  of  his  father. 

June  24.  Indians  attacked  a  portion  of  Ool.  Heber 
V.  Kimball's  command,  killing  OhaTles  Brown  and 
T^'ounding  Thomas  Snow,  in  Thistle  Valley. 

June  20.  Jonathan  Edmiston,  of  Manti,  was  killed 
by  Indians  in  a  battle  at  Spanish  Fork, 

July  1.  Circle  A^alley  was  abandoned  and  settlers 
returned  to  Ei^hraim. 

July  12.  Capt.  Bigler  and  60  men  from  Davis, county 
arrived  at  Mt.  Pleaisant  to  relieve  the  Salt  Lake  county 
troops. 

July  27.  Indians  made  a  night  raid  on  the  stock  of 
Ephraim  and  Manti  and  drove  away  150  head.  Capt. 
Bigler  pursued  them  into  Castle  Valley  without  recover- 
ing the  stock  or  having  an  engagement. 

Aug.  15.  George  Peacock  and  W.  S.  Snow  were 
elected  members  of  the  legislative  assembly  from  San- 
pete county. 

Dec.  28.    Deseret  Telegraph  line  opened  to  Manti. 


58  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

1867. 

Jan.  7.  John  Lowry,  Sr.,  one  of  the  Sanpete  pio- 
neers, died  at  Manti. 

March  21.  Indians  raided  Glenwood,  killing  Jens 
Peter  Peterson  and  wife  and  Mary  Smith. 

April  20.  Richfield  and  Glenwood  settlements  weG^e 
abandoned,  the  settlers  returning  to  Sanpete  Valley. 

May  1.  Gen.  D.  H.  Wells  released  Gen.  W.  S.  Snow 
and  placed  Gen.  W.  B.  Pace  in  command  of  the  Sanpete 
Military  District. 

June  1.  Louis  Lund  was  killed  and  Jasper  Robert- 
eon  wounded  by  Indians,  while  herding  stock  near  Foun- 
tain Green. 

June  2.  Maj.  John  W.  Vance  and  Sergt.  Heber 
Houtz  were  killed  by  Indians  on  Twelve  Mile  creek. 

July  19.  Grasshoppers  came  in  great  numbers  and 
destroyed  most  all  the  crops  in  Sanpete. 

Aug.  13.  Indians  attacked  Spring  City,  killed  James 
Meeks  and  Andrew  Johansen  and  wounded  William 
Blain. 

Sept.  4.  John  Hay  was  killed  by  Indians,  while 
burning  lime  near  Gunnison. 

Nov.  21.  First  issue  of  the  Deseret  Evening  News 
appeared  in  Salt  Lake  City,  copies  being  sent  to  San- 
pete. 

Dec.  17.    Bishop  Caleb  G.  Edwards  died  at  Ephraim. 

1868. 

Feb.  14.  Ephraim  was  incorporated  as  a  city,  with 
an  area  of  one  and  one-half  square  miles. 

Feb.  20.  Mt.  Pleasant  was  made  a  city,  with  an  area 
of  thirty  square  miles. 

April  6.  Indians  attacked  a  company,  under  Bishop 
Olsen,  on  the  Sevier  river,  near  Richfield,  killed  Lars  A. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  59 

Justesen  and  Charles  Wilson  and  wounded  K.  Thomp- 
son. 

]May.    Grasshoppers  destroyed  much  of  the  grain. 

June  22.     Heber  0.  Kimball  died  in  Salt  Lake  City. 

June  25.  Niels  Christopherson  and  Peter  Smith  of 
Manti,  Peter  Nilsen  of  Fairview  and  Chris  Jensen  and 
Chris  Kebeker  were  drowned  at  Robinson's  Feny,  on 
Green  Eiver. 

July  5.  Seth  Child  shot  and  wounded  an  Indian, 
who  proved  to  be  friendly. 

July  11.  Indians  raided  Ei)hraim  and  drove  away 
most  of  the  cattle. 

August  19.  A  treaty  was  made  with  the  Indians  in 
Strawberry  Valley  and  they  ceased  hostilities. 

September  26.  Indians  attacked  Fairview  and  drove 
away  eighteen  horses,  killing  James  Miller  and  son. 

Oct.  16.  Zion's  Co-operative  Mercantile  Institution 
was  opened  for  business  in  Salt  Lake  City,  and  branch 
houses  established  at  all  important  places. 

October.  George  P.  Billings  and  others  from  San- 
pete A'^alley  w^ere  engaged  in  Weber  canyon,  building  a 
grade  for  the  Union  Pacific  railroad. 

1869. 

February.  Co-operative  merchandising  was  intro- 
duced by  President  Brigham  Young,  and  the  benefits  ex- 
plained. 

March  1.  Navajo  Indians  raided  Washington  and 
Kane  counties,  killing  three  friendly  Piutes  and  driving 
away  50  head  of  stock. 

March  8.  The  Deseret  University  was  opened  in  Salt 
Lake  City. 

May  10.  The  Pacific  Railway  was  completed  and 
Brigham  Young  drove  the  last  spike  at  Promontoiy.  Sev- 
eral rv'&idents  of  Sanpete  county  assisted  in  the  work. 


60  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

June  28.  The  townsite'S  of  Spring  City,  Fairview 
and  Fountain  Green  were  entered  in  the  land  office  at 
Salt  Lake  City,  by  Probate  Judge  George  Peacock. 

Aug.  2.  George  Taylor  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
legislature  from  Sanpete. 

August.  Grasshoppers  destroyed  much  of  the  gTain 
in  Cache,  Washington  and  Kane  counties,  but  did  no 
damage  in  Sanpete. 

Oct.  31.  Indians  made  a  raid  on  Kanara,  Kane 
county. 

December.  The  Mormon  emigration  from  Europe 
for  the  year  was  about  8,000  persons,  some  coming  to 
Sanpete. 

1870. 

Jan.  1.  The  Weekly  TMbune  was  issued  in  Salt 
Lake  City  and  circulated  in  Sanpete. 

Jan.  10.  Last  rail  of  the  Utah  Central  railroad  was 
lakl  and  last  spike  driven  by  Brigham  Young.  Many 
residents  of  Sanpete  valley  assisted  in  building  this  road. 

Februaiy  11.  Spring  City  was  incoirpoa'ated  by  act  of 
the  legislature. 

Februain-  12.  A\'oman  Suffrage  bill  passed  the  legis- 
lature and  was  signed  by  Acting  Governor  S.  A.  Mann. 

May  20.  A  band  of  Indians  came  tx>  Manti  and  made 
a  treaty  with  President  Orson  Hyde. 

June  18.  John  Stuart,  of  Faiiwiew,  was  convicted 
of  killing  an  Indian  girl  and  sentenced  to  be  shot  July 
11th. 

June  25.    John  Stuai't  broke  jail  and  escaped. 

July.  Grasshoppers  came  so  thick  as  to  darken  the 
sun's  rays,  and  did  much  damage. 

Aug.  1.  Women  voted  for  the  first  time.  Keturns 
were:     W.  H.  Hooper,  for  Delegate  to  Congress,  1650; 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  61 

W.  S.  Snow,  for  representiaitive,  1648,  and  GeoTge  Pea- 
cock, for  representatiye,  1,638  votes. 

September  15.  Gov.  J.  W.  Shaifer  issiicd  a  i)rocla- 
luation  proliibiting  drill,  muste'r  or  gathering-  of  the  Utah 
^lilitia,  except  by  order  of  the  United  States  Marshal. 

1871. 

April  8.  Grasshoppers  again  appeared  in  tlie  coun- 
ties north  of  Sanpete,  but  few  were  seen  in  this  county. 

April  15.    The  Salt  Lake  Ttibune,  daily,  wais  issued. 

May  1.  Ground  was  broken  for  the  Utah  Southern 
railroad,  and  several  men  and  teanis  from  Sanpete 
county  went  to  work  on  the  grade. 

June  30.  Geo.  A.  Black,  acting  Governor,  issued  a 
proclamation  agaihst  all  persons  participating  in  mili- 
taiy  drill  or  mustei',  under  D.  H.  Wells. 

1872. 

Februaiy  16.  Fairview  was  incoirporated  as  a  city, 
with  an  area  of  twenty  square  miles. 

February  19.  A  constitutional  convention  met  in 
Salt  Lake  City  and  framed  a  State  Constiutioii. 

Macpch  18.  The  vote  for  and  against  a  State  consti- 
tution stool  25,321  for  and  368  against  the  adoi)tioin. 

June  1.  The  Woman's  Exponent  was  first  published 
in  Salt  Lake  City, 

June  16.  Niels  Ileizelt  was  killed  by  Indians  at 
I'welve  Mile  creek. 

September  7.  Gen.  Morrow  and  command  entered 
311  Pleasant  to  force  the  Indians  on  their  reservation, 
a  treaty  was  made  and  the  Indians  returned  to  their 
reservation,  the  trooi)s  going  to  Douglas. 

1873. 

May.  May  field  was  settled  by  Simon  Hansen,  Mads 
P.  Sorenson,  Ole  C.  Olsen  and  others. 


62  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

December.  The  Utaih  Posten,  the  firs-t  Danish  paper 
published  in  Utah,  was  issued. 

1874. 

May  2.  The  Fairview  Coal  Mining;  and  Ooke  com- 
pany was  incorporated. 

July  24.  Anniversary  of  the  entrance  of  pioneers 
into  Salt  Lake  Valley  was  celebrated  in  the  capital,  over 
4,000  singers  pai'ticipating  in  the  new  tabernacle. 

August.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  Greorge  Q. 
C^annon  received  2460  votes  and  Hon.  R.  N.  Baskin  3,  for 
Delegate  to  Congress,  in  Sanpete  county. 

1875. 

Januaiy  22.  Indians  were  first  maiTied  according 
to  the  ordinances  of  the  Mormon  church. 

March  3.  Rev.  D.  J.  McMillan  preached  the  first 
Gentile  sermon  in  Sanpete,  at  ^Mt.  Pleasant. 

March  29.  The  entii^e  tribe  of  Shebit  Indians,  num- 
bering 147,  was  baptized  into  the  Mormon  church,  at  St. 
George. 

•  April  20.  The  first  mission  school  under  the  Presby- 
terian Board  of  IMissions  was  opened  at  Mt.  Pleasant,  by 
J.  S.  McMillan. 

April.  About  twenty  families  from  Ephraim  re- 
moved to  Mayfleld. 

August  5.    Joseph  A.  Young  died  at  Manti. 

September  1.  George  A.  Smith  died  in  Salt  Lake 
City. 

December  14.  A  bill  was  presented  in  the  House 
t>f  Representatives  to  enable  the  people  of  Utah  to  form 
a  State  government,  and  for  the  admission  of  Utah  into 
the  Union. 

1876. 

July  24.    Levi  Larsen  was  killed  at  Ephraim. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  63 

September  20.  Jolin  D.  Lee  was  convicted  of  murder 
in  tJie  first  degree  for  connection  with  the  Mountain 
]\feadow  massacre. 

October  10.  Judge  Jacob  Boreman  sentenced  John 
D.  r^e  to  be  shot  on  Friday,  January  26,  1877. 

November.  At  the  general  election  held  this  year, 
Hon.  George  Q.  Cannon  received  1,921  and  Hon.  E.  N. 
Kaskin  40  votes,  in  Sanpete  county,  for  Delegate  to  Con- 
gress, 

1877. 

March  23.  John  D.  Lee  was  executed  at  Mountain 
Meadow. 

April  20.    Ground  was  bi'oken  for  the  Manti  temple. 

April  21.  The  site  for  the  Manti  temple  was  dedi- 
cated. 

July  4.  Sanpete  Stake  was  organized,  with  Canute 
Peterson  president,  Heniy  Beal  and  John  B.  Maiben 
counsellors. 

July  10.  Mayfield  was  organized  as  a  ward,  with 
Ole  C.  Olsen  bishop. 

August  20.  President  Biigham  Young  died  at  his 
residence  in  Salt  Lake  City. 

September.  Joseph  S.  McMillan  and  wife  opened  a 
Presbyterian  mission  school  in  Manti. 

October.  Miss  M.  Fishback  of  Illinois  took  charge 
of  a  Presbyterian  miss.ion  school  opened  in  Ephraim  by 
J.  S.  McMillan. 

1878. 

June  22.  Eleven  persons  were  drowned  in  Funk's 
Lake. 

November  15.  Hon.  James  A.  Allred  was  appointed 
Probate  Judge  of  Sanpete  county. 

November  16.    Orson  Hyde  died  at  Spring  City. 

November.     Hon.  George  Q.  Cannon  was  the  only 


64  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

candidate  for  Delegate  to  Cono-i'ess,  and  received  1,292 
votes  in  Sanpete  county. 

1879. 

April  14.  Corner  stones  of  the  Mauti  temple  were 
laid,  Jolm  Tavlor  laying  the  southeast,  Edward  Hunter 
the  southwest^  F.  W.  Cox  the  noi-thwest,  and  H.  S.  El- 
dredge  the  north eavst, 

April  24.  The  first  Utah  wheat,  including  some 
from  Sani)ete,  was  shipi>ed  to  LiveT|3ool,  from  San  Fran- 
( isco,  by  S.  W.  Sear??. 

^lay  30.  Jezre*^]  Shomnker,  one  of  the  Sanpete 
l-ioneei*s,  died  at  his  home  in  Manti. 

June  2.     Fredei'ick  W.  C^ox  died  at  ^lauti. 

October  4.  The  fii-s-t  number  of  the  Contributor  was 
issued  at  Salt  Lake  City. 

1880. 

March  4.  The  SaJt  Lake  Weekly  Herald  was  pub- 
lished and  circulated  in  Sauijete. 

June  23.  The  I^tah  Southern  railroad  was  eom- 
])]eted  to  Fnsco,  and  tlie  Sanx)ete  Valley  projecteil  from 
Xephi  to  Wales. 

July  20.  The  U.  S.  CensuvS  report  showed  Utah  had 
a  population  of  143,690,  an  increase  of  56,904  since  1870. 

December  6.  George  H.  Lulve  and  Chris  Madsen  of 
!Mantl  were  killed  while  working  on  the  Denver  and  Rio 
Grande  railroad  in  Colorado. 

December.  At  the  general  election  this  year  Hon. 
George  Q.  Cannon  I'e^ceived  1,673  and  Hon.  Allen  G. 
Campbell  13  votes,  in  Sanpete  county,  for  Delegate  to 
Congr-es«. 

1881. 

January  23.     Freeborn  De  Mill  died  at  Manti. 
May  13.     O.  W.  C.  Moenster  died  at  Sterling. 


HISTOEY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  65 

October  3.  Orsou  Pratt  died  at  his  residence  in  Salt 
Lake  City. 

November.  Manti  rresbvterian  Crucli  was  erected 
tljis  season,  at  a  cost  of  |4000.  Miss  Mai^-  Crowell  opened 
a  Presbyterian  mission  scliool  at  Giuinison. 

1882. 

Februaiy  16.  The  Edmunds-Tucker  bill  passed  the 
United  States  Senate. 

April  10.  A  constitutional  convention  met  in  Salt 
Lake  City  and  framed  a  State  constitution. 

•     August  18.    The  Utah  Commission  aiTived  in  Utah 
and  prepai'ed  for  the  election. 

November  7.  A  general  election  was  held  and  Hon. 
John  T.  Caine  received  1,671  and  P.  T.  Van  Zile  123  votes 
in  Sanpete,  for  Delegate  to  CongTess. 

November  7.  Hon.  "William  Anderson  was  elected 
Probate  Judge  of  Sanpete  county. 

1883. 

April  1.  The  Rio  Grande  Western  railroad  was  com- 
pleted through  Utah  to  Salt  Lake  City. 

June  10.  Five  young  persons,  some  having  relatives 
in  Sani^ete,  were  drowned  in  Utah  lake,  near  Benjamin. 

October  16.  Bishop  Edward  Hunter  died  in  Salt 
Lake  City. 

November.  Rev.  P.  A.  H.  Franklin  began  mission- 
ary work  under  the  auspices  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church,  at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

1884. 

January  28.  The  Brigham  Young  Academy  at  Prove 
was  burned. 

August.  Sanpete  was  represented  in  the  Teiritorial 
Council  by  Hon.  L.  T.  Tuttle  and  in  the  House  by  R.  R. 
Lewellyn  and  A.  B,  Thurber. 


66  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

September.  Hon.  Jacob  Johnsoii  was  United  States 
Commissioner  for  Sanpete  county. 

November  3.  Hans  Ottoson  was  murdered  in  Manti. 

Sanpete  had  this  year  18  miles  of  railroad  in  the 
Sanpete  Valley,  valued  at  |33,478.  The  county  popula- 
tion was  13,867.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  John  T, 
Caine  i^ceived  1655  and  Hon.  Ransford  Smith  48  votes 
for  Delegate  to  Congress. 

1885. 

February  28.  James  S.  Parsons  of  Manti  was  killed 
by  a  horse  falling  on  him. 

April  24.  The  Home  Sentinel  was  first  issued  in 
Manti,  by  James  T.  Jakeman. 

September  1.  Diphtheria  caused  a  complete  quar- 
antine of  Gunnison. 

October  13.  Soren  Ohristensen  of  Moroni  was  killed, 
while  hunting  in  the  mountains. 

November  29.  U.  S.  Deputy  Marshals  made  a  raid 
on  Manti  in  quest  of  men  practicing  polygamy. 

1886. 

February  27.  Big  Hill  Resei-Aoir  Company  incoi-po- 
rated  at  Spring  City. 

July  30.    Eock  work  on  Manti  temple  completed. 

October.  The  Methodist  church  in  Mt.  Pleasant  was 
erected,  and  a  chapel  built  in  Moroni  and  Ephraim  this 
year. 

November.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  John  T. 
Caine  received  1,665  and  Hon.  W.  M.  Ferry  122  votes  in 
Sanpete,  for  Delegate  to  Congi-ess. 

1887. 

March  10.  The  Moroni  Irrigation  Company  was  in- 
corporated. 

May  23.     C.  C.  N.  Dorius  was  arrested  at  Ephraim 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  67 

for  violation  of  the  Edmunds-Tuclver  law  concerning  plu- 
ral wives. 

May  24.  Manti  temple  was  searched  by  U.  S.  Mar- 
shals looking  for  polygamists. 

June  8.  Spring  City  was  raided  by  United  States 
officers,  seeking  offenders  of  the  Edmunds  law. 

June  22.  Manti  was  entered  by  U.  S.  Marshals  and 
John  Buchanan  and  Ei chard  Hall,  Sr.,  arrested  for  viola- 
tion of  the  Edmunds  law. 

June  28.  Hon.  Aaron  Hardy,  of  Moroni,  was  ar- 
rested for  violating  the  law  concerning  plural  mar- 
riage. 

July  15.  John  S.  Jones  of  Manti  was  murdered  at 
Boco,  Colorado. 

July  22.  Bishop  W.  T.  Reid  of  Manti  was  arrested 
for  polygamy. 

August  13.  President  Canute  Peterson  of  Ephraim 
was  arrested  for  violating  the  Edmunds  law. 

August  20.  President  Canute  Peterson  was  dis- 
charged on  promising  to  obey  the  law. 

September  14.  Hon.  Aaron  Hardy  was  sentenced  to 
six  months'  imprisonment. 

October  25.  Henry  Beal,  Peter  N.  Peterson  and 
Peter  O.  Hansen  were  sentenced  to  imprisonment. 

November  3.  Hans  C.  Hansen  of  Gunnison  was  sen- 
tenced for  violating  the  Edmunds  law. 

December.  The  Edmunds-Tucker  act  of  this  year 
disfranchised  the  women  and  created  the  right  of  dower. 

1888. 

April  15.  Chester  Draper  was  accidentally  shot  and 
killed  by  Percy  Candland,  at  Chester. 

April  25.  Shocks  of  Earthquake  were  felt  at  Eph- 
raim. 

May  21.    The  Manti  temple  was  dedicated. 


68  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

June  22.  Tlie  Gunnison  Irrlgiation  company  was  in- 
corporated. 

July  8.  O.  S.  Cox,  one  of  the  pioneer's  of  Sanpete, 
died  at  Manti. 

October  27.  Richard  Henningsen  of  Manti  was 
killed  in  a  mine  at  Tintic. 

November  30.    D.  B.  Funk  died  at  Funk's  Lake. 

December.  Hon.  Jacob  Johnson  was  appointed  this 
rear  as  Fi-obate  Judge  of  Saiipct^s  in  conij^lianct'  with  the 
Edmunds  law. 

December.  At  the  general  election  this  year  Hon. 
J(  hn  T.  Caine,  Peoi)le's  Pai-ty  candidate,  received  1)14 
votes,  Hon.  Jl.  N.  Baskin,  Libei-al  candidate,  12S  votes, 
and  Hon.  S.  B.  Tliuiiuan,  known  as  the  '^Sagebrush 
Democracy"  candidate,  41)  votes,  in  Sanpete  for  Delegate 
to  Congress. 

1889. 

Februaiw  18.  The  Oak  C^xH^k  Iiiigation  company 
was  incoiiiorated,  at  Faii^iew. 

March  11.  The  Birch  Ci-eek  Irrigation  Company,  at 
Fainiew,  was  incoi'porated. 

]\[arch  14.  The  West  Boint  Irrigation  Company,  at 
Wales,  was  incoii^orated. 

April  1.  The  North  SixOIile  Creek  In-igation  Com- 
pany was  incoiq)orated  at  Sterling. 

April  10.  The  Manti  Irngation  Company  Avas  in- 
corporated. 

April  15.  The  Wales  Irngation  Company  was  in- 
corporated. 

May  25.  John  O.  Nielsen  was  killed  by  a  rock  fall- 
ing on  his  head,  while  digging  a  well  at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

August  16.  Floods  in  Manti  and  the  southern  part 
of  Sanpete  caused  much  damage,  and  a  boy  was  killed 
at  ]Maytield. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  69 

September  25.  Erick  Ericksen  was  killed  while 
threshing  at  Mt,  Pleasaiit. 

November  22.  The  Phoenix  mill  at  Fonntain  Green 
was  burned. 

November  28.  Parlane  McFarlane  shot  and  killed 
H.  O.  Hansen  and  W.  H.  Golding  at  Manti. 

1890. 

February  25.  The  Gooseberiy  and  Cottonwood  Irri- 
gation company,  at  Fairview,  was  incorporated. 

April  8.  John  Gribble  was  killed  by  the  falling  of  a 
b;ink  in  the  hills  west  of  Manti. 

May  3.  The  INIeaidow  Irrigation  Company,  at  Fair- 
view,  w^as  incorporated. 

May  19.  A  Woman's  Suffrage  convention  was  held 
in  Manti. 

May  27.  The  Gunnison  Reservoir  broke,  causing 
considerable  damage. 

May  29.  John  Cloward  of  Moroni  was  killed  by  his 
hc-rse  falling  over  a  ledge  in  the  mountains. 

June  21.  The  Milburn  Imgation  Company  was  in- 
corporated. 

June.  The  County  Register  was  first  published  in 
lOphraim  by  James  T.  Jakeman. 

July  13.  A  flood  in  Manti  destroyed  considerable 
property. 

July  19.  A  general  flood  of  water  throughout  south- 
ern Sanpete  damaged  the  crops  to  an  estimated  value  of 
,^25,000. 

September  4.  A  Scandinavian  reunion  ^^•as  held  in 
Ephraim. 

October  1.  Peter  Lauritzen  of  Moroni  was  killed  by 
a  bull. 

November  6.  J.  W.  Hoggan's  sawmill  in  Manti  can- 
yon was  burned,  causing  him  a  loss  of  |8,000. 


70  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

November.  The  Pyramid  was  published  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  by  A.  B.  Williams. 

Dec.  29.  A  grand  celebration  was  held  in  Manti,  on 
the  completion  of  the  Eio  Grande  Western  railroad  to 
that  city. 

December.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  John  T. 
Caine  received  1,216  and  Hon.  C.  0.  Goodwin  174  votes 
in  Sanpete  for  Delegate  to  Congress. 

December.  The  United  States  Census  report  showed 
the  population  of  Sanpete  county  to  be  13,14G. 

1891. 

April  10.  The  Chester  Sanpitch  Canal  Company  was 
incorporated. 

April  18.  The  IVin  Creek  IiTigation  Company  Avas 
incorporated  at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

April  18.  The  Pleasant  Creek  IiTigation  Company 
was  incorporated  at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

May.  The  Rio  Grande  Western  railroad  was  ex- 
tended south  into  Sevier  county. 

October.  The  Wasatch  Academy  at  Mt.  Pleasant 
was  completed  and  occupied. 

1892. 

March  9.  The  Mayfleld  In-igation  Company  was  in- 
corporated. 

May  10.  The  Deseret  Inigation  Company  was  in- 
corporated at  Wales. 

November.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  J.  L.  Eaw- 
lins  received  977  votes,  Hon.  Prank  J.  Cannon  966  votes 
and  Hon.  C.  E.  Allen  59  votes  for  Delegate  to  Congr-ess. 

1893. 

June  20.  The  Moroni  and  Mt.  Pleasant  Irrigation 
and  Ditch  Company  Avas  incoi-porated  at  Moix)ni. 


HISTORi'    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  71 

June  28.  The  Coal  Fork  Imgating  Company  at  Mt. 
Pleasant  was  incorporated. 

October  13.  The  Messenger  was  first  published  at 
Manti,  with  Joel  Bhomaker  editor. 

October  26.  President  Grover  Cleveland  signed  a 
bill  restoring  the  escheated  Mormon  church  property. 

November  7.  Hon.  Jacob  Johnson  was  elected  a 
member  of  the  Utah  legislature  and  Hon.  C.  N.  Lund 
member  of  the  council  for  Sanpete. 

November.  Gunnison  was  made  a  town  under  the 
direction  of  the  county  court. 

November  29.  The  first  train  over  the  Sanpete  Val- 
ley railroad  was  run  to  Manti  and  a  great  celebration 
held  by  the  citizens: 

December.  Hon.  W.  K.  Reid  was  appointed  Probate 
Judge  of  Sanpete  this  year. 

December.  The  Manti  Printing  and  Publishing 
Company  was  incorporated. 

December.  Free  soup  houses  were  established  in 
Salt  Lake  City. 

1894. 

Jan.  1.  The  new  school  building  in  Manti  was  dedi- 
cated. 

March  24.  The  Spring  City  Irrigation  Company  was 
incorporated. 

April  13.  The  California  delegation  of  Coxey's 
army,  numbering  1,200,  reach  Utah. 

April  20.  H.  E.  Carter  organized  a  company  of  the 
Industrial  Army  in  Salt  Lake  City. 

April  20.  A  company  of  the  National  Guard  of 
Utah  was  organized  at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

May  28.  The  Sanpete  Valley  Eailway  Company 
amended  its  charter  to  include  extension  south  through 
Cedar  City. 


72  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

May  12.  The  Industrial  Army  stole  a  train  from 
the  Union  Pacific  at  Lehi. 

June  4.  Heni'T  Olsen  was  drowned  in  a.  reservoir 
at  Mt.  Pleasant. 

July  10.  The  bill  admitting-  Utah  as  a  State  passed 
the  Senate  with  but  two  dissenting^  votes. 

July  14.  A  heavy  flood  did  much  damage  at  Foun- 
tain Green. 

July  16.  The  Statehood  bill  Avas  signed  by  Grover 
Cleveland. 

AugTist  20.  The  Utah  pioneei*s,  including  several 
fiom  Sanpete  county,  Hons.  George  P.  Billings,  Daniel 
Henrie  and  Horace  Thornton  being  in  the  list,  were  en- 
tertained  by  the  Sfiltair  Beach  company. 

September  15.  Joel  Shoemaker  I'epresented  Sanpete 
county  in  the  National  Inngation  Congress  at  Denver, 
Colorado. 

Septemlx^r  2(5.  Jamc-s  Bums,  Sheriff  of  Sanpete 
was  shot  and  killed  by  Mocn  KoH'ord  and  Peter  Meikle. 

November  7.  The  Sanpete  X'alley  railroad  was  com- 
j>leted  and  first  train  nin  to  Morrison. 

November  9.  The  Cottonwood  Canal  and  Tunnel 
Company  was  incoi'porated  at  Ephraim. 

November.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  Frank  J. 
Cannon  received  1,420  votes,  Hon.  J.  L.  Eawlins  1,370 
votes  and  Hon.  H.  L.  Gaut  5  votes  for  Congressman. 

November  26.  W.  T.  Reid,  HeniT  Beal  and  Swen  O. 
Nielson  represented  Sanpete  in  the  Trans-Mississippi 
Congress  at  St.  Louis. 

November.  The  Hons.  J.  D.  Page  of  Mt.  Pleasant, 
C.  P.  Larsen  of  Manti,  A.  C.  Lund  of  Ephraim,  Lauritz 
Larsen  of  Spring  City,  James  C.  Peterson  of  Fairview 
Joseph  Jolley  of  Moroni  and  Parley  Christiansen  of  ^lay- 
field  Avere  elected  members  of  the  Constitutional  Conv(^n- 
tion  for  Sanpete. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  73 

December.  Much  excitement  was  caused  over  al- 
leged election  fi-auds  in  Sanx)ete  county. 

December.  Hon.  Josepk  Judd  was  appointed  Pro- 
bate Judge  of  Sanpete  this  year. 

December.  The  report  of  the  Statistician  for  this 
year  showed  the  population  of  Sanpete  was  15,538.  There 
v.ere  1,540  fanns,  00,010  acres  improved  and  10,970  acres 
unimproved  land.  The  counts^  had  111,331  sheep,  1638 
cows,  11,260  range  cattle,  5863  horses  and  4,238  swine. 
The  farm  products  were:  Wheat,  353,257  bushels;  corn, 
1,726  bushels;  oats,  135,077  bushels;  barley,  16,091  bush- 
els; rye,  4,170  busJiels;  potatoes,  7(>,472  busliels;  alfalfa, 
27,985  tons;  hay,  11,646  tons;  butter,  212,532  pounds; 
cheese,  8,180  pounds;  honey,  61,220  pounds.  There  were 
422  acres  jilanted  to  fruit  trees,  90  industrial  concerns, 
88  stores,  2  railroads  and  5  coal  mines. 

1895. 

Januaiw  1.  Albert  Tuttle  of  ^Manti  was  accidentally 
killed  by  falling  on  the  pavement. 

June  17.  The  AVest  View  Inigation  Company  was 
incorporated  at  Gunnison. 

Septemer.  P.  O.  Hansen,  the  veteran  Scandinavian 
missionaiy,  died  in  Manti. 

September  3.  Joel  Shomaker  was  appointed  by 
Gov.  Caleb  W.  West  as  a  delegate  from  Sanpete  to  the 
j^ational  Irrigation  Congress  at  Albuquerque,  New  Mex- 
ico. 

Xov.  5.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  C.  E.  Allen  re- 
ceived 1,529  votes,  Hon.  B.  H.  Eoberts  1,420  votes  and 
Hon.  James  Hoggan  16  votes  in  Sanpete  county  for  Con- 
gressman. Hon.  Jacob  Johnson  was  elected  Judge  of 
tlie  Seventh  Judicial  district  and  Hons.  W.  D.  Caudland, 
Peter  Thompson  and  John  Lowiy  members  of  the  first 
State  Legislative  Assemblv. 


74  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

November.  The  vote  on  the  State  constitution  in 
Sanpete  was  2,644  for  and  295  against  its  adoption.  The 
vote  of  Utah  was  31,305  for  and  7,687  against  the  consti- 
tution. Woman  suffrage  was  incorporated  in  the  con- 
stitution. 

December.  Hon.  Jacob  Johnson  was  appointed  this 
year  by  President  Benjamin  Harrison  Probate  Judge  for 
Sanpete  county. 

1896. 

January  4.  Grover  Cleveland,  President  of  the 
United  States,  issued  a  proclamation  admitting  Utah 
into  the  union  of  States. 

February  18.  The  Gunnison  City  and  Antelope  Val- 
ley Canal  Company  was  incorporated. 

February  25.  The  Eobbins  and  Keames  Dam  and 
Canal  Company  was  incorporated  at  Gunnison. 

March  4.  The  Mammoth  Reservoir  Company  was  in- 
corporated at  Manti. 

March  12.  The  Fayette  Canal  Company  was  incor- 
porated. 

March  14.  The  Gunnison  Highland  Canal  Company 
was  incoi'porated. 

November  5.  At  the  general  election  Hon.  J.  F. 
Allred  ^vas  elected  State  Senator  and  Hons.  Aaron 
Hai'dy  and  N.  C.  Sorenson  members  of  the  Legislature 
for  Sanpete  County. 

December  2.  George  P.  Billipgs,  ex-Sheriff  and  a 
pioneer  of  Sanpete,  died  at  his  home  in  Manti. 

December  The  lirst  vote  of  the  State  for  Presi- 

dent of  the  United  States  stood:  For  W.  J.  Biyan,  50,987 
majority  over  William  McKinley.  The  entire  vote  being 
77,877.  Sanpete  County  stood:  W.  J.  Bryan,  3,286,  and 
WUliam  McKinley,  1,82^. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  75 

1897. 

April  17.  The  Willow  Creek  Irrigation  Company 
Avas  incorporated  at  Axtell. 

December  22.  The  Sand  Ridge  Reseryoir  and  Canal 
Company  was  incorporated  at  Ephraim. 

1898. 

June  The  Sanpete  Democrat  was  first  issued  in 
Manti,  with  L.  A.  Lanber  publisher. 

Jul}"  25.  A  disastrous  fire  in  Mt.  Pleasant  caused  a 
loss  of  110,000  and  several  business  houses. 

September  2.  President  Wilford  Woodruff  died  in 
California. 

October       The  Histoiy  of  Sanpete  was  published 
by  ^y.  H.  Lever. 

October  The  war  with  Spain  was  had  this  year 

and  several  men  volunteered  from  Sanpete  County.  W. 
J.  Stacey,  Captain  of  Company  '"F,"  Utah  National 
Guard  of  Manti,  was  appointed  Second  Lieutenant  in 
Battery  C,  Utah  Light  Artillery. 


MANTI 


pC\  ANTI  is  pleasantly  situated  on  the  eastern  side  of 
ill  Sanpete  Valley,  about  the  center  of  the  county,  125 
miles  south  from  Salt  Lake  City,  and  surrounded 
by  broad,  fertile  fields  that  comprise  a  portion  of  the  great 
^'Granary  of  Utah."  The  altitude  is  a  little  over  5,000 
feet,  the  climate  veiy  mild,  seldom  below  zero  in  winter 
and  never  above  100  degrees  in  August,  and  the  location 
so  protected  by  mountain  ranges  as  to  be  perpetually 
free  from  cyclones,  huiTicanes  and  destructive  stonns  of 
the  elements  of  an  overcharged  electrified  atmosphere. 
The  site  stands  upon  an  alluvial  cone  overlooking  the 
winding  river,  the  rolling  harvest  fields  and  the  great 
expanse  of  tillable  area  to  the  north  and  the  south,  com- 
manding a  view  for  many  miles  in  either  direction.  No 
more  suitable  spot  could  have  been  selected  by  the 
pioneers  to  found  this  primitive  city  of  central  Utah. 

On  the  evening  of  November  20,  1849,  the  little  band 
of  noble  sons  and  daughters  camped  on  the  banks  of  the 
clear  mountain  stream,  now  rushing  through  the  center 
of  this  city,  and  calmly  yet  resolutely  surveyed  the  bleak, 
uninviting  desert,  out  of  which  they  expected  to  carve 
homes  for  themselves  and  children.  The  anticipations 
were  certainly  anything  but  pleasant,  for  the  colonists 
were  in  the  midst  of  an  overwhelming  host  of  Indians, 
who  stood  ready,  on  the  slightest  provocation,  to  massa- 
cre every  man,  woman  and  child  and  blot  out  all  indica- 
tions of  civilization  before  even  a  furrow  was  turned  to 
make  an  irrigating  ditch.  Winter  was  coming  on  and 
houses  could  not  be  constructed  before  the  forests  were 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  77 

sealed  in  the  embraces  of  deep,  impenetrable  snowbanks; 
the  food  supply  was  veiy  limited,  with  no  prospect  of  any 
aid  except  from  Salt  Lake  City,  and  the  icebound  walls 
of  Salt  Creek  canyon  would  soon  be  locked  against  the 
ox  trains,  their  only  means  of  transportation. 

Seth  Taft  looked  about  him  to  the  north  and  the 
south  and  discouragingly  remarked:  '^This  valley  is 
only  a  long,  narix)w  canyon,  and  not  even  a  jackrabbit 
can  exist  on  its  desert  soil."  He  proved  the  sincerity  of 
his  thouglits  by  leaving  the  following  spring,  under  the 
impression  that  the  colonists  would  soon  starve.  The 
first  winter,  the  facts  concerning  Avhich  have  been  re- 
corded in  the  countj^  history,  was  certainly  a  most  dis- 
couraging season,  and  the  late  spring  was  almost 
enough  evidence  that  Taft  had  spoken  the  truth  con- 
cerning Sanpete  Valley.  But  the  summer  was  favorable, 
houses  were  constructed  of  logs,  stones  and  dugouts  and 
crops  Avere  grown  in  the  field  then  held  as  common  prop- 
erty. After  one  year's  residence  the  conditions  were 
more  pleasing,  the  provisions  plentiful,  the  weather  very 
much  modified  and  homes  more  comfortable. 

The  Legislature  recognized  the  value  of  a  city  organ- 
ization for  Manti,  and  on  February  6,  1851,  a  bill  was 
passed  and  api^roved  bj^  the  Governor  incorporating  the 
city.  The  area  the^n  included  ten  miles,  extending  from 
Six-Mile  Creek  on  the  south  to  Willow  Creek  on  the 
north,  and  from  Sanpitch  river  on  the  west  to  the 
Wasatch  mountains  on  the  oast.  In  April,  1851,  the  first 
city  election  was  held  and  all  "free  white  male  inhabi- 
tants of  the  age  of  eighteen  years"  were  permitted  to 
vote.  The  officers  elected  were:  Dan  Jones,  Mayor;  Jez- 
reel  Shomaker,  Phineas  W.  Cook,  O.  S.  Cox  and  James 
C.  Brown,  Aldermen;  John  D.  Chase,  Edwin  Whiting, 
Abram  Washburn,  George  P.  Billings,  Isaac  Morley,  Jr., 
S.  H.  Marble,  Newman  Brown,  John  Low^rj^,     Jr.,     and 


78  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Cyrenus  H.  Taylor,  Councillors.  The  bill  incorporating 
the  city  provided  that  after  the  second  Monday  in  Feb- 
ruary, 1863,  the  city  officials  should  consist  of  one  Mayor, 
two  Aldermen  and  three  Councillors. 

For  many  years  tJie  history  of  Manti  was  practically 
a  record  of  the  count}^,  for  the  early  settlements  had  to 
be  abandoned  on  account  of  Indian  troubles  and  this  city 
became  a  place  of  refuge  for  colonists  driven  from  their 
homes  by  their  savage  foes.  In  the  spring  of  1853  a  post- 
office  was  established  with  Judge  George  Peacock  as 
postmaster,  and  communication  with  the  world  was 
opened  and  the  city  began  to  assume  metropolitan  airs 
for  a  place  so  much  isolated.  The  Indians,  however,  did 
not  appi'eciate  the  evidences  of  civilization  and  made  all 
the  ti'ouble  they  could  by  stealing  cattle  and  attacking 
defenseless  herders  and  travelers.  This  necessitated  the 
erection  of  a  stone  fort  for  the  protection  of  people  and 
property,  and  during  the  summer  of  1853  the  walls  were 
built  by  co-operative  efforts,  each  man  having  a  certain 
portion  to  erect  according  to  his  ability  to  perform  the 
labor  ^(luired. 

While  the  Indians,  under  Chief  Walker,  were  driving 
away  cattle  and  harassing  the  colonists  at  eveiy  oppor- 
tunity^, a  greater  foe  came  unexpectedly  from  some  un- 
known source,  and  threatened  immediate  starvation  to 
everv^  family  in  the  city.  The  grasshoppers  entered  the 
fields  and  gardens  and  greedily  devoured  every  species 
of  vegetation  except  a  wild  spinach  or  "pig  weed"  that 
sprang  up  at  the  foot  of  "Temple  Hill,"  where  the  first 
camp  was  made.  The  women  and  children  collected 
these  Aveeds  and  cooked  them  for  food  while  the  men 
battled  against  grasshoppers.  All  crops  were  cut  short 
during  1855-6  by  the  pests,  but  in  1857  a  bountiful  har- 
vest cheered  the  then  disheartened  colonists  and  peace 
and  contentment  once  more  smiled  upon  the  people.    The 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  79 

settlers  located  upon  their  several  city  lots  and  began 
making  improvements  according  to  their  limited  means 
and  desires  of  individual  families. 

In  October,  1853,  the  first  city  census  showed  that 
Manti  contained  647  men,  women  and  children,  Avhile  the 
entire  county  population  was  only  7G5,  the  settlers  at 
Pleasant  Creek  supplying  the  number  of  118.  This  little 
band  of  hardy  pioneers  battled  Indians  and  grasshop- 
pers and  cared  for  visitors  from  Salt  Lake  City  and  mili- 
tiamen from  the  north  who  tendered  their  services  to 
guard  the  homes  and  herds  of  the  settlers  while  they 
gathered  tbeii*  crops  and  hauled  suflftcient  wood  for  win- 
ter. Though  few  in  numbers  they  had  a  school  taught 
by  IMrs.  Mary  Whiting,  a  local  theatrical  troupe  called 
"The  Amateur  Thespians,"  under  the  management  and 
training  of  Mrs.  Esther  Smith,  a  small  grist  mill  erected 
by  Phineas  W.  Cook  and  sawmill  built  by  Charles  Shum- 
way.  A  regular  military  organization  was  kept  in  readi- 
ness to  repel  Indian  attacks  and  daily  details  were  made 
by  the  commanding  officer  for  sentinels  at  important 
points. 

The  entire  valley  was  covered  with  a  dense  growth 
of  sagebrush,  which  had  to  be  cleared  and  burned  before 
the  fields  could  be  prepared  for  irrigation  and  cultiva- 
tion. Ditches  were  constructed  to  carry  the  water  from 
city  creek  to  the  several  fields  under  the  co-operative 
plan  of  a  union  of  labor  and  division  of  interests.  The 
cows  were  herded  on  a  tract  set  apart  and  known  as  the 
range  and  a  general  community  plan  existed  in  eveiy 
public  effort.  The  division  of  fields  remains  at  present, 
and  in  locating  a  particular  tract  of  land  the  city  Avater 
schedule  describes  it  as  in  the  ''Danish  Field,"  "Cane 
Field,"  "Middle  Field,"  "Old  Field,"  "Brigham  Field"  or 
"Quariw  Field,"  all  having  distinctive  marks  for  boun- 
darv  lines.     The  natural  flow  of  the  creek  was  soon  ap- 


80  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

propriated  by  elaimantKS  in  the  several  fields  and  in  the 
summer  season  the  channel  below  the  city  is  dry. 

After  several  years  of  inexpensive  co-operation, 
when  water  taxes  were  unknown  and  labor  answered  all 
demands  for  annual  ditch  maintenance,  the  Manti  Irri- 
gation Company  was  incorporated  and  later  the  City 
Council  assumed  the  responsibilities  of  water  distribu- 
tion. The  company  \\  as  incorporated  April  10,  1889, 
under  a  Territorial  law  passed  in  1884,  defining  the  du- 
ties and  privileges  of  corporations.  The  capital  stock 
was  placed  at  |100,000,  divided  among  the  original  share- 
holders in  the  neighborhood  or  community  ditches.  Since 
then  reservoirs  have  been  built,  springs  developed  and 
the  mountains  tunneled  to  increase  the  water  and  enable 
new  claimants  to  cultivate  additional  acres.  The  tilla- 
ble area  now  reaches  about  10,000  acr-es  and  more  land 
is  annua  11}'  reclaimed  from  desert  aridity  and  planted  to 
grain,  alfalfa  and  fruit  trees. 

]\ranti,  i)roperly  speaking,  began  its  history-making 
separate  from  the  county-  after  the  treaty  made  with  the 
Indians  in  1872,  and  has  grown  in  business  importance 
until  it  occujues  a  prominent  position  among  the  leading 
cities  of  Utah.  No  extensive  efforts  have  been  made  at 
establishing  manufactunng  concerns,  but  the  natural 
facilities  are  excellent  for  building  and  maintaining 
woolen  mills,  sugar  factories,  tanneries  and  other  indus- 
tries. The  city  has  unequaled  water  power,  a  perfect 
system  of  waterworks  and  a  climate  that  cannot  be  ex- 
celled anywhere  in  the  West.  The  raw  materials,  with 
inexhaustible  coal  supplies,  best  railway  facilities  and  a 
boundless  market,  double  the  inducements  for  investing 
capital,  constructing  manufacturing  works  and  making 
of  this  city  the  industrial  metropolis  of  Utah. 

The  finest  oolite  and  gTay  sand  building  stone  crops 
out  from  the  eastern  foothills,  the  mountains     furnish 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  81 

abundance  of  native  timbers  and  all  other  elements  of 
home  and  factory  building  are  everywhere  present.  The 
average  annual  rainfall  does  not  exceed  six  inches  and 
the  atmosphere  is  dry  and  invigorating.  No  pulmonary 
diseases  can  exist,  miasmatic  complaints  are  unknown 
and  health  in  all  its  perfect  fullness  may  be  seen  in  the 
ruddy  cheeks  and  strong  constitutions  of  the  people.  The 
Warm  Springs  on  the  south  possess  extraordinary  medi- 
cinal qualities,  and  if  properly  cared  for  and  judiciously 
managed  would  soon  become  famous  the  world  over  as 
the  greatest  sanitarium  of  the  West.  With  these  and 
many  other  natural  advantages  the  Temple  City,  now  a 
beautiful  place  of  about  3000  inhabitants,  may  aspire  to 
the  second  city  of  magnitude  and  importance  within  the 
State. 

April  20,  1877,  ground  was  broken  for  the  magnifi- 
cent temple  now  adorning  the  hill  under  whose  protec- 
tion the  pioneers  spent  their  first  and  most  severe  win- 
ter.  Four  days  later  the  site  was  dedicated  by  President 
Brigham  Young  and  work  began  on  that  consecrated 
structure.  April  14,  1879,  the  corner-stones  were  laid  in 
the  presence  of  an  immense  throng  of  Saints.  John 
Taylor  laid  the  southeast.  Edw^ard  Hunter  the  south- 
west, F.  W.  Oox  the  northwest  and  H.  S.  Eldredge  the 
northeast.  The  building  was  completed  and  dedicated 
May  21,  1888,  and  when  fully  finished  with  cut-stone 
steps  leading  from  the  road  to  the  west  door  and  trees 
and  grass  planted  between  the  terrace  walls  will  have 
cost  over  one  and  a  half  millions  of  dollars.  The  enor- 
mous sum  w^as  raised  by  the  free-will  donations  of  resi- 
dents of  the  Manti  Temple  district. 

The  building  is  constructed  of  native  white  oolite 
stone,  quaiTied  within  a  few  hundred  yards  of  the  site, 
and  required  the  labor  of  the  most  skilled  artisans  ob- 
tainable.    Several  Manti  citizens  were  prominent  in  the 


82  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

work  of  erecting-  this  edifice  and  held  responsible  posi- 
tions. The  main  building  is  172^  feet  long  and  95  feet 
wide  and  from  the  ground  to  the  square  is  92  feet  in 
height.  The  east  tower  is  179  feet  and  the  west  tower 
169  feet  high.  The  base  of  the  building  is  63  feet  above 
the  road  and  designed  to  be  approached  by  stone  steps. 
Hon.  J.  D.  T.  McAllister  is  the  president  of  the  temple 
and  has  a  corps  of  able  men  and  women  devoted  to  the 
cause  of  Christianity,  laboring  under  his  wise  supervi- 
sion. This  building  is  used  exclusively  for  ordinance 
work  and  is  visited  every  year  by  hundreds  of  saints. 

In  the  early  days  school  facilities  were  not  so  good 
as  at  present,  but  a  schoolhouse  was  erected  the  first 
winter  and  others  added  as  necessity  demanded.  The 
rapid  increase  of  pupils  soon  necessitated  the  use  of 
two  stone  schoolhouses,  the  upstairs  of  the  courthouse 
and  city  hall,  the  council  house  and  even  a  portion  of  the 
Tuttle  block.  In  1892  the  voters  decided  to  bond  the  dis- 
trict for  twenty  years,  for  the  purpose  of  securing  money 
to  erect  a  suitable  central  building  of  sufficient  capacity 
for  accommodating  all  the  patrons  and  conducting  a 
model  modern  graded  school.  The  building  was  finished 
and  dedicated  January  1,  1894,  some  of  the  home  people 
purchasing  bonds  and  advancing  money  for  the  work. 
The  trustees  under  whose  counsel  the  house  was  erected 
were  P.  H.  Madsen,  Ferdinand  Alder  and  Lewis  Ander- 
son. The  stonework  was  done  hj  E.  L.  Pariy  &  Sons. 
The  building  cost  |14,270,  the  heating  apparatus  |1,700, 
furniture  over  one  thousand  dollars  and  maps,  charts  and 
other  oqui])ments  make  a  total  of  about  -f20,000  ex- 
pended on  this  magnificent  structure.  It  has  a  seating 
capacity  of  550,  contains  nine  rooms,  is  three  stories  in 
heiglit  and  an  ornament  to  the  Tabernacle  block,  nyon 
which  it  is  erected.  The  schools  are  ably  conducted 
under  the  efficient  direction  of  Superintendent  A.  C.  Nel- 


HON.    L.    T.    TUTTLE, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  83 

son,  and  Manti  stands  out  as  a  prominent  city  of  tlie 
State  in  the  matter  of  i3ublic  schools.  Tbe  grounds  are 
being-  planted  to  trees,  a  library  is  accumulating  and  the 
public  school  of  the  present  is  a  palace  and  paradise 
when  compared  to  the  past,  though  the  former  schools 
were  probably  the  best  the  people  could  erect  and  sup- 
port. 

The  Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of  Latter-day  Saints, 
commonly  known  as  the  Mormon  church,  was  organized 
with  the  settlement  of  the  colony,  all  of  the  pioneers  be- 
ing called  as  missionaries  by  President  Brigham  Young 
to  build  up  the  countiy  and  civilize  the  Indians.  Manti 
was  made  a  ward  under  the  control  of  Father  Morley  and 
the  regular  church  organizations  were  instituted.  In 
later  years  two  wards  were  created,  the  dividing  line  be- 
ing Union  street.  The  north  ward  is  presided  over  by 
Bishop  William  T.  Reid,  with  Henry  Parsons  and  J.  H. 
Wodskow  as  counsellors,  and  the  south  ward  by  Bishop 
Hans  Jensen,  with  Hans  Westenskow  and  Jens  Mickel- 
sen  as  counsellors.  Each  ward  has  its  regular  Sunday 
schools  and  ward  meetings,  while  general  convocations 
are  held  in  the  Tabernacle  every  Sunday  in  the  after- 
noon 

In  September,  1877,  J.  S.  IMcMillan  and  wife  opened 
a  mission  school  in  this  city,  under  the  auspices  of  the 
Presbyterian  Board  of  Missions.  On  Saturday  evening, 
April  20,  1878,  Eev.  R.  G.  McNiece  preached  in  Fox's 
hall  and  the  Presbyterian  church  was  organized  with 
ten  members.  Ole  Nelson,  Rasmus  Miller  and  Theodore 
E.  Friese  were  elected  ruling  eldei-s.  Later  F.  W.  Blom 
and  Andrew  Xelson  were  ordained  elders  and  John  F. 
Braithwaite  deacon.  Rev.  G.  W.  Martin  became  the 
stated  supply  of  the  church  in  1879  and  continued  in  that 
capacity  till  1893,  when  he  was  installed  as  pastor,  which 
office  he  continues  to  hold.    The  Sunday  school,  superin- 


84  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

tended  by  George  R.  Braithwaite,  has  an  enrollment  of 
about  forty  pupils.  The  mission  day-school  has  had  an 
attendance  of  from  sixty  to  125  scholars  since  beginning 
in  1877.  The  church  building  was  erected  in  1881  of 
native  oolite  stone  at  a  cost  of  flOOO.  This  constitutes  the 
schoolhouse  and  place  of  worship  where  regular  services 
are  held.  Following  is  a  list  of  the  teachers  employed 
from  the  beginning  of  the  mission :  Mrs.  J.  S.  McMillan, 
]\Iiss  E.  W.  Alexander,  ^Miss  Fanny  Galbraith,  Miss  0.  A. 
Farrand,  Miss  L.  E.  Leonard,  Miss  Capitola  Slade,  Miss 
Jennie  Stoops,  ]Miss  F.  O.  (^uillen,  Miss  Viola  Wynne, 
Miss  M.  B.  Barrett,  Miss  L.  A.  Wiles,  ]Miss  Emily  Mc- 
Carty,  Miss  Effie  AA'illiams,  Miss  Louise  Ilolsclaw  and 
Miss  S.  B.  Sutherland.  Some  of  tbeir  pupils  have  become 
public  school  teachers,  one  has  served  as  County  Super- 
intendent and  one  has  bcK^n  a  city  principal.  ]Many  are 
married  and  residing  in  this  and  neighboring  cities. 

The  commercial  intei'ests  of  Manti  began  by  co-op- 
eration in  early  days,  and  the  organization  of  the  Co-op 
store,  sheep  herding  association,  cow  herding  company 
and  similar  co-operative  endeavors.  Before  the  building 
of  railroads  grain  and  produce  was  hauled  to  Salt  Lake 
City  and  the  mining  towns  of  southern  Utah  and  eastern 
Nevada.  Teams  would  make  the  trip  to  Salt  Lake  City 
loaded  with  the  products  of  this  city  and  return  with 
merchandise.  Much  of  the  business  was  done  on  a  script 
or  due  bill  plan,  the  stoi*es  issuing  orders  payable  in 
merchandise  for  labor  and  produce  purchased.  The 
business  of  freighting  was  then  a  most  profitable  occupa- 
tion and  many  citizens  accumulated  sufficient  to  pur- 
chase homes  and  farms.  This  system,  like  everything 
else,  has  changed  since  the  railroads  have  linked  Manti 
with  the  commercial  world  and  more  modern  transporta- 
tion methods  are  adopted. 

Manti  has  numerous  mercantile  houses  located     in 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  85 

modern,  well-constructed  and  elegant  buildings.  A  solid 
banking  institution  owned  and  operated  by  home  people; 
first-class  blacksmiths,  carpenters  and  other  skilled  arti- 
sans and  mechanics;  an  up  to  date  and  well  appointed 
drug  store;  modern  well-furnished  and  thoroughly 
e^iuipped  hotels;  enterprising  farm  machinery  and  im- 
plement dealers;  experienced  and  industrious  photo- 
graphers; affable  and  obliging  railway  agents  and  direc- 
tors; well-edited  and  carefully  prepared  newspapers; 
eihcient  and  thorough  physicians  and  teachers;  accom- 
plished attorneys  and  officials,  and  in  short,  every  indus- 
try represented  is  marked  by  competency  and  strong 
personality^  characteristic  of  the  stern,  patriotic  men  who 
braved  the  perils  incidental  to  pioneer  life  and  made  this 
valley  a  perfect  paradise  of  vegetation. 

The  Manti  City  Savings  Bank  is  the  financial  insti- 
tution to  which  capitalists,  investors  and  business  men 
loolc^  for  an  index  of  the  commercial  transactions  of  this 
city.  This  representative  corporation  is  composed  of  the 
best  and  most  careful  financiers  of  the  city  and  reflects 
the  spirit  of  home  industry  and  patriotism  in  all  its  deal- 
ings. It  was  incorporated  in  1890  with  a  capital  stock 
of  |25,000,  which  was  increased  to  .|50,000,  fully  paid  up, 
the  lamented  Herman  J.  Christensen  and  Hon.  L.  T. 
Tuttle  being  the  prime  movers  in  establishing  the  con- 
cern. A  two-story  stone  building  was  erected  and  the 
bank  opened  its  doors  for  business.  The  services  of  a 
most  capable,  honest  and  obliging  cashier,  Albert  Tuttle, 
now  deceased,  were  secured,  and  in  a- very  short  time 
money  poured  into  the  vaults  from  all  sections  of  central 
Utah,  until  it  became  known  in  the  money  centers  as  one 
of  the  safest  instituions  of  the  State.  The  business  in- 
creased to  such  an  extent  that  an  assistant  had  to  be 
added  and  P.  P.  Dyreng,  the  present  obliging  cashier, 
was  installed  as  one  of  the  bank  employees.    The  deposi- 


86  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

tors  now  number  hundreds  and  assets  reach  about  one- 
quarter  million  dollars,  with  a  surplus  of  |15,000,  and 
steadily  inci'easing;  business.  Regular  dividends  are  paid 
in  semi-annual  installments  and  interest  is  compounded 
quarterly  on  time  deposits.  The  official  directory  con- 
sists of  the  following  well-hnown  and  thoroughly  respon- 
sible citizens:  L,  T.  Tuttle,  i^resident;  James  Crawford, 
Jr.,  vice-president;  P.  P.  Dyreng,  cashier;  J.  Hatten  Car- 
penter, assistant  cashier;  J.  B.  Maiben,  W.  G.  Crawford, 
F.  P.  Tuttle  and  Lewis  Anderson,  members  of  the  board 
of  directors. 

The  Central  Utah  Wool  Company  Avas  incorporated 
in  1891  with  a  capital  stock  of  |2r),000,  the  shareholders 
and  directors  being  chietly  residents  of  Manti.  This  com- 
pany begau  in  a  small  way  by  handling  wool  and  sheep 
on  commission,  but  soon  did  such  an  enormous  business 
in  buying  and  sidliug  direct  from  grower  to  manufac- 
turer that  the  comuiission  work  was  practically  aban- 
doned. The  men  who  formed  the  first  directorate  are  most- 
ly engaged  in  the  same  business  and  have  built  up  the 
greatest  money-producing  house  in  this  city.  The  annual 
sales  amount  to  about  one-sixth  of  the  entire  wool  clip 
of  the  State  and  some  purchases  are  made  in  Wyoming. 
Energetic  and  up-to-date  buyers  are  engaged  by  this  firm 
and  during  the  wool  season  may  be  found  in  every  sheep- 
,  growing  section  of  Utah,  distributing  hundreds  of  thou- 
sands of  dollars  among  the  people.  The  first  board  of 
directors  consisted  of  Ezra  Shomaker,  president;  James 
Metcalf,  vice-president;  Lewis  Anderson,  secretary;  L.  R. 
Anderson,  assistant  secretary;  Albert  Tuttle,  treasurer; 
with  Luther  Tuttle,  AV.  G.  Crawford  and  Niels  Thomp- 
son. Under  their  wise  management  the  compan}^  passed 
through  the  financial  panic  of  1893  and  now  stands 
among  the  best  dividend-payers  of  central  Utahi,  with 
patrons  numbered  by  the  hundreds.     The  company  also 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  87 

handles  sheepmen's  supplies  of  sacks,  twine,  sulphur, 
dip,  wagons,  wire  and  eaiTiages.  Present  officials  are: 
Ezra  Shomaker,  president;  F.  P.  Tuttle,  vice-president; 
Lewis  Anderson,  secretaiy  and  treasurer  and  general 
manag-er;  WaiTen  C.  Snow,  assistant  secretary;  with  W. 
G.  Crawford,  Luther  Tuttle,  Niels  Thompson  and  James 
Crawford,  directoi's. 

The  Manti  Co-operative  Mercantile  Institution  is  one 
of  the  oldest  and  busiest  business  houses  in  the  citv.  Two 
large  two-story  buildings  are  occupied  in  carrying  an 
immense  stock  of  dry  goods  groceries,  clothing,  machin- 
ery- and  farm  implements.  The  company  is  incorporated 
with  a  capital  stock  of  .*?13,610,  divided  into  shares  of  .?10 
each,  iipon  which  regular  annual  dividends  are  paid  to 
many  of  the  representative  families  in  this  city.  A  com- 
petent board  of  directors,  consisting  of  W.  T.  Eeid,  Hans 
Jensen  and  E.  T.  Parry,  assisted  by  J.  H.  Wodskow,  sec- 
retary, and  Alex.  Tennant,  superintendent,  handle  the 
business  in  a  most  satisfactory^  manner.  This  fjrominent 
firm  began  in  the  early  days  in  a  little  12xl5-foot  build- 
ing, with  ver^^  limited  capital  and  small  patronage.  To- 
day a  stock  of  about  |15,000  is  carried  and  four  clerks 
are  necessary  to  transact  the  great  volume  of  business. 

Tuttle  &  Co.  is  an  old,  well-known  firm  so  linked 
Avith  the  business  interests  and  financial  development 
of  Manti  as  to  form  one  of  the  most  important  factors  in 
the  history  of  the  city.  Hon.  L.  T.  Tuttle,  the  chief  per- 
sonage and  moving  spirit,  has  been  engaged  in  merchan- 
dising for  many  years,  having  formerly  been  superin- 
tendent of  the  Co-op  store,  and  thoroughly  understands 
the  wants  of  his  customers  and  the  fundamental  princi- 
ples of  success.  He  never  hesitates  in  accommodating 
the  poorest  person,  though  he  numbers  among  his  cus- 
tomers the  wealthiest  men  of  the  county.  Always  hospi- 
table, kind  and  obliging  and  to  the  front  in  every  public- 


bb  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

spirited  and  charitable  donation,  Father  Tuttle  has 
earned  his  success  and  is  justly  entitled  to  all  honors  be- 
stowed and  Avealth  accumulated.  The  firm  consists  of 
father  and  sons  and  H.  M.  Edwards  of  Sterling  and  owns 
two  large  two-story  buildings,  occupjiug  the  major  part 
in  carrying  the  mammoth  stock  of  |15,000  worth  of  dry 
goods,  gToceries,  clothing  and  general  merchandise. 
Four  clerks  are  necessary  to  attend  to  the  business  and 
in  the  holiday  seasons  double  that  number  are  sometimes 
engaged  in  waiting  on  customers.  The  elegant  iron-front 
building  contains  three  extra  storerooms  always  in  de- 
mand, a  commodious  amusement  hall  ever  popular,  and 
several  smaller  offices  used  by  professional  men.  This 
firm  handles  sheep,  cattle  and  farm  produce  when  neces- 
saiy  to  make  a  bargain,  which  may  be  regarded  as  the 
keynote  to  j^ears  of  continued  success  in  outfitting  the 
families  of  Manti  and  vicinity. 

The  Manti  Creamery  is  a  new^  industry,  added  to  the 
city  in  1898  by  three  enterpiising  citizens — Joseph  Judd, 
W.  D.  Livingston  and  E.  V.  Hardy.  The  creamery  is  an 
up-to-date  manufacturing  plant,  making  fine  butter  and 
cheese,  and  consuming  the  product  of  300  cows  in  Manti, 
Sterling,  Mayfield  and  vicinity.  Ezra  Billings,  a  compe- 
tent young  man  of  this  city,  is  the  operator  and  the  busi- 
ness is  managed  by  Joseph  Judd.  The  company  is  com- 
posed of  representative  business  men  and  entitled  to  all 
the  patronage  possible. 

Lumbering  has  always  been  an  important  industry 
in  this  city  and  two  planing  mills  operated  by  Edwin  M. 
Works  and  Andrew  Anderson,  are  kept  busy.  They  are 
enterprising  and  representative  men  interested  in  de- 
veloping the  city  and  making  it  the  great  commercial 
center  the  people  aspire  for  and  are  entitled  to  much 
credit  for  industry  and  patriotism. 

Grace  Brothers  is  one  of  the  representative  firms  of 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  89 

Manti,  consisting  of  three  brothers,  Isaac  H.,  John  W. 
and  Charles  H.,  residents  of  Nephi.  The  firm  began  bus- 
iness in  Nephi  in  1885,  and  opened  a  branch  house  in 
Manti  in  Jul}',  1896.  They  were  the  first  to  ship  building 
supplies  into  Sanpete  Valley  in  carload  lots,  resulting  in 
a  general  reduction  of  prices  to  builders  of  homes.  The 
firm  is  doing  a  good  business  in  handling  doors,  windows, 
mouldings,  hardware,  coal  and  combination  fence.  R. 
H.  Evans  is  the  enterprising  and  obliging  manager  of  the 
Manti  house. 

April  21,  1885,  the  Home  Sentinel,  the  first  news- 
paper published  in  Sanpete  county,  was  issued  in  Manti, 
by  James  T.  Jakeman.  The  papier  was  published  every 
Aveek  for  several  years,  changing  hands  frequently,  and 
the  plant  was  purchased  by  a  company,  composed  of 
about  forty  of  the  prominent  citizens.  This  company 
was  incorporated  in  1893,  the  capital  stock  being  |5000, 
under  the  name  of  the  Manti  Printing  and  Publishing 
Company.  The  first  officers  were  Ezra  Shomaker,  presi- 
dent; Ferdinand  Alder,  vice-president;  D.  J.  Lindsey,  sec- 
retary and  treasurer,  who,  with  L.  C.  Kjar,  Andrew  Pe- 
terson, Luther  Tuttle  and  P.  A.  Poulsen,  formed  the 
board  of  directors.  The  Manti  Messenger,  a  weekly  pub- 
lication was  launched  by  this  company,  the  first  issue  ap- 
pearing October  13,  1893,  with  Joel  Shomaker  as  editor. 
It  sprang  into  popularity  at  once  and  advertised  Manti 
and  her  resources  to  the  world.  After  several  changes  in- 
cidental to  most  rural  papers  the  Messenger  is  now  pub- 
lished by  P.  A.  Poulsen,  who  has  remained  in  the  office 
from  the  time  the  first  number  was  published.  The  pres- 
ent directory  consists  of  C.  P.  Larsen,  president;  L.  C. 
Kjar,  vice-president;  E.  T.  Parry,  secretary  and  treas- 
urer, who,  with  Andrew  Peterson,  Alfred  Alder,  W.  D. 
Livingston  and  J.  G.  Crawford  constitute  the  board  of 
directors. 


90  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

In  June,  1898,  the  Sanpete  Democrat,  a  weekly,  well 
edited  and  clean  publication,  published  by  L.  A.  Lauber, 
made  its  first  appearance,  thus  making  two  regular  news- 
papers published  in  this  city. 

The  farmers  of  Manti  produce  enormous  crops  of 
grain,  much  of  which  is  exported  to  the  east  and  the  west 
every  year,  but  the  home  demand  for  flour  and  feed  has 
been  so  great  that  three  mills  were  erected,  on  the  banks 
of  City  creek,  and  propelled  by  water  power.  Georg  Sid- 
well,  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Utah,  erected  a  large  stone 
mill  near  the  mouth  of  the  canyon  east  of  the  city  several 
years  ago  and  put  in  burr  mills.  This  Avas  operated  for 
many  years  and  finally  leased  by  Louis  F.  Becker,  an 
Eastern  expert,  who  remodelled  the  mill  and  put  in  all 
the  latest  improvements,  making  it  a  model  50-barrel 
mill.  His  trade  is  extending  every  year,  and  his  brands 
of  floiir  ma}^  be  found  in  Tintic,  Salt  Lake  City  and  other 
important  Utah  points,  where  good  food  products  are  in 
demand. 

In  1898  the  Union  Eoller  Mill  company  was  incor- 
porated with  a  capital  stock  of  |20,000,  with  |8000  paid 
up.  This  company  is  composed  of  some  of  the  best  citi- 
zens of  the  citj^  and  directed  by  J.  H.  Hougaard,  E.  W. 
Fox,  Louis  C.  Kjar,  Andrew  Nelson  and  J.  Hatten  Car- 
penter. The  mill  is  fitted  up  with  modern  machinery 
and  run  by  Alex  Scott,  an  experienced  and  capable  man. 
The  capacity  is  forty  baiTels  per  day  and  the  products 
are  consumed  at  home  and  in  the  adjoining  mar- 
kets of  the  State.  In  addition  to  doing  custom 
and  commercial  work  the  mills  furnish  a  cash  market  for 
much  of  the  local  grain  supply  in  small  lots,  thus  the 
farmers  are  able  to  turn  their  wheat  to  cash  without 
seeking  a  foreign  market.  The  Union  Eoller  Mill  com- 
pany contemplate  putting  in  an  electric  light  and  power 
plant  for  supplying  the  city  with  light  and  power  for  ma- 
chinerv. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  91 

^Nlauti  has  always  been  noted  as  a  citv  of  amusement- 
loving-  people,  but  the  accommodations  have  never  been 
sufficient  for  theatrical  perfomiances  until  in  recent 
years.  In  early  days  the  Council  House  was  used  for  the 
"Amateur  Thespians"  and  other  home  dramatic  troupes, 
but  later  Griers  Hall  was  aiTanged  as  a  theater  and 
dancing  pavilion.  Then  Tuttle's  Hall  became  the  pop- 
ular resort  for  dancing  and  banquet  parties,  with  the 
South  Ward  Assembly  hall,  a  favor-ite  for  dances  and 
political  gatherings.  In  1897  X.  H.  Felt  demonstrated 
his  loyalty  to  the  city  and  people  in  erecting  a  large 
pavilion,  which  is  used  for  general  amusement  purposes. 
This,  in  connection  with  the  other  halls,  supplies  all  de- 
mands for  the  diversified  amusements  of  old  and  young- 
characteristic  of  the  inhabitants,  who  had  to  create 
amusements  in  early  days. 

Although  a  quiet,  liberty-loving  people,  not  given  to 
warfare  of  any  nature,  the  citizens  of  Manti  are  filled 
with  national  patriotism  and  loyalty  to  country.  Upon 
the  first  call  of  President  William  ^McKinley  for  volun- 
teers to  fight  in  the  war  against  Spain,  for  freeing  Cuba 
from  bondage,  seven  young  men  enlisted  in  the  United 
States  forces  and  sailed  for  the  Philippine  Islands.  The 
names  of  those  patriotic  youths  who  surrendered  home 
comforts,  friends  and  prospects  of  future  independence, 
in  the  cause  of  humanity,  are:  H.  E.  Coolidge,  Nephi 
Ottoson,  George  Lacey,  George  Larsen,  Andrew  Peter- 
son, Thomas  Hoggan,  Jr.,  and  Leonard  McCarty.  Sev- 
eral have  been  honored  with  appointments  to  the  non- 
commissioner  staff.  Other  volunteers  not  accepted  were 
James  Jorgensen,  Andrew  O.  Peterson,-  John  Kinni- 
burgh,  Fred  Kammerman  and  01  e  C.  Nelson. 

The  military  enthusiasm  did  not  require  a  Avar  to 
come  to  the  surface  as  one  of  the  best  companies  of  the 
Utah  National  Guard  was  in  existence  previous  to  de- 


92  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

daring  war  with  Spain.  The  company  was  almost  filled 
with  noble  young  men  of  the  city  and  commanded  by 
Capt.  W.  J.  B.  Stacey,  First  Lieut.  H.  E.  Coolidge  and 
Second  Lieut.  Nephi  Ottoson,  all  of  whom  entered  the 
service  of  the  United  States.  Capt.  Stacey  was  appoint- 
ed a  recruiting  officer  under  Gov.  Heber  M.  Wells,  for 
the  second  call  made  by  the  President  and  made  Second 
Lieutenant  in  Battery  C,  which  also  went  to  the  Philip- 
pine Islands.  The  home  company  is  at  present  com- 
manded by  Capt.  Ezra  Christiansen,  First  Lieut,  Bruce 
Cox  and  Second  Lieut,  Luther  Tuttle,  Jr.,  and  is  com- 
posed of  many  of  the  sons  of  leading  families. 

Manti  is  well  represented  among  the  prominent  se- 
cret and  fraternal  organizations,  having  two  halls  fitted 
up  for  the  exclusive  use  of  different  lodges.  The  Ancient 
Order  United  Workmen  is  the  pioneer  society,  having 
been  organized  in  1892,  and  has  a  large  and  increasing 
membership,  made  up  of  influential  men,  who  desire  pro- 
tection to  their  homes  and  families  in  case  death  should 
claim  tliem  before  their  mission  on  earth  has  been  ful- 
filled. Three  local  members  have  passed  beyond  this  life 
since  the  organization  of  Manti  Lodge  No.  23,  and  their 
widows  have  each  received  |2,000.  They  were  Albert  Tut- 
tle, cashier  of  the  Manti  City  Savings  bank;  Charles  Ten- 
nant,  assistant  postmaster,  and  James  Burns,  Sheriff  of 
Sanpete  county.  Kegular  meetings  are  held  in  the  A.  O. 
U.  W.  hall  every  Saturday  evening.  W.  W.  Crawford  is 
master  workman  and  Alex  Tennant  recorder. 

Court  Fremont  No.  8542,  Ancient  Order  Foresters  of 
America,  was  organized  March  31,  1895,  with  eighteen 
charter  members.  A  hall  was  fitted  up  neatly  and  the 
order  began  its  existence  under  flattering  auspices.  The 
officers  were:  J.  E.  Cochran,  Chief  Eanger;  Joel  Sho- 
maker,  Past  Chief  Banger;  D.  J.  Lindsey,  Sub-Chief 
Kanger;  Louis  E.  Tuttle,  Senior  Woodman;  Niels  Jorgen- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  ^'6 

sen,  Junior  Woodman;  0.  P.  Ostler,  Senior  Beadle;  Rob- 
ert Witmer,  Junior  Beadle;  J.  W.  Hoggan,  Treasurer;  W. 
J.  Hosford,  Physician  and  Druggist:  Arthur  Parsons, 
Chris  Lund  and  J.  0.  Cahoon,  trustees.  After  about  one 
year  the  court  was  disbanded  and  the  members  went  in 
a  body  and  assisted  in  organzing  the  present  lodge  of 
Odd  Fellows. 

During  the  year  1895  several  attempts  were  made  to 
organize  a  lodge  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows in  Manti,  but  failed  on  account  of  opposition  and 
the  thought  that  an  additional  society  could  not  be  sus- 
tained.    In  January,  1896,  Dr.  W.  J.  Hosford,  H.  A.  Tal- 
bot, J.  II.  Ilornung  and  J.  E.    Cochran,    resident    mem- 
bers, petitioned  the  grand  lodge  for  a  charter,  and  on 
January  11,  1896,  Temple  City  Lodge  No.  23  was  insti- 
tuted with  sixteen  members.     Since  then  the  order  has 
steadily  increased  in  membership  till  it  numbers  more 
than  fifty  prominent  citizens.     The  I.  O.  O.  F.  Hall  is 
elegantly  fitted  up  with  an  organ,  neat  furniture  and  all 
the  necessary  paraphernalia,  the  lodge  has  a  good  treas- 
uiy  and  no  debts.     Eegular  meetings  are  held   in  the 
hall,  over  Kjar's  harness  shop,  every  Saturday  evening. 
E.  T.  Hosford  is  Noble  Grand  and  Alex  Scott,  Secretary. 
Evergreen  Eebekah  Lodge    No.  11    was    instituted 
April  17,  1898,  with  eighteen  charter  members.       This 
order  numbers  among  its  members  a  select  roll  of  prom- 
inent society  men  and  women,  alive  to  the  interests  of 
fraternal  institutions  and  necessity  for  banding  together 
in  the  cause  of  humanity.     Regular  weekly  meetings  are 
held  in  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  hall.     Mrs.  W.  J.  Hosford  is  Noble 
Grand  and  E.  T.  Hosford  Eecording  Secretary. 

Unity  Forum,  No.  1319,  of  the  Home  Forum  Benefit 
Order,  was  organized  in  1897  with  a  good  membership  of 
well-known  ladies  and  gentlemen  intere.^ted  in  mutual 
insurance  of  homes  and  families.     The  order  has  grown 


94  .  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

to  a  good  membership,  which  increases  with  regular 
meetings,  as  its  objects  and  benefits  become  more  gener- 
ally known  and  understood.  Meetings  are  held  every 
Wednesday  evening  in  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  Hall  and  visiting- 
companions  are  always  made  welcome  guests.  Mrs.  M. 
C.  Fredrick  sen  is  president  of  Unity  Forum. 

Manti  has  an  excellent  and  economical  municipal  ad- 
ministration made  up  of  old  citizens  interested  in  the 
public  welfare.  The  creek  has  been  divided  and  flumed 
to  prevent  any  accumulation  of  debris  and  carry  away 
high  water  and  floods;  a  perfect  AvaterAvorks  system  is  in 
operation;  the  irrigation  water  supply  is  satisfactorily 
distributed;  the  streets  are  kept  clean  and  the  main  thor- 
oughfares are  avcU  graded;  the  city  cemetery  is  one  of 
the  neatest  and  best-kept  homes  of  the  dead  in  the  State; 
contageous  diseases  and  epidemics  are  kept  under  con- 
trol by  strict  (juarantine,  and  taxes  are  reduced  to  the 
lowest  possible  limit  for  a  city  of  such  proportions. 

The  present  city  official  directory  composed  of  Ke- 
publicans  and  Democrats,  elected  in  1897,  or  appointed 
by  the  Council,  is  as  follows: 

Mayor — Alexander  Tennant. 

Councillors — Fred  Jensen,  F.  M.  Cox,  A.  W.  Bessey, 
Ernest  Munk,  Alma  Johnson. 

Recorder — George  Scott. 

Marshal — Otto  Ottoson. 

Justice — G.  A.  Iverson. 

Quarantine  Physician — W.  H.  Olsten. 

Superintendent  of  Waterw^orks — William  Bench. 

City  Watermaster — John  Moffitt. 

Supervisor  of  Streets — Julius  Jensen. 

City  Engineei' — J,  H.  Hougaard. 

City  Pound  Keeper — Andrew  Nelson. 

City  Sexton — George  Braithwaite. 

City  Attorney — William  K.  Eeid. 


PROMINENT  CITIZENS  OF  MANTI. 


Q  LDEE,  ALFKED,  farmei-  and  grain  shipper  of  Mauti, 
rj  and  brother  of  the  Hon.  Mayor,  was  born  in 
/  t^L'hwellbriin,  Switzerland,  September  4,  1851.  Came 
with  the  family  in  1860,  and  to  Manti  in  1862.  He  was 
raised  on  a  farm  and  became  engaged  in  freighting  pro- 
duce to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada,  and  fol- 
lowed that  business  ten  years.  For  the  last  six  years 
he  has  been  buying  and  shipping  grain.  Owns  a  far-m 
<>f  thirty  acres,  and  has  a  comfortable  residence.  Has 
been  City  TVater  Master  for  five  years;  is  also  a  stock- 
holder and  director  of  the  Manti  Printing  and  Publish- 
ing Company,  which  company  does  all  kinds  of  job  work 
and  issues  the  Messenger  weekly. 

He  married,  in  Spring  City,  February  5,  1877,  Miss 
Elvira  J.  Cox,  daughter  of  Frederick  W.  and  Jemima, 
who  were  old  settlers  here.  He  has  four  sons  and  four 
daughters,  viz.,  Ella,  John  A.,  Byron  F.,  Frank  M.,  Fer- 
dinand, Merle,  Hettie  and  Eeba  A. 

Mr.  Alder,  although  of  foreign  birth,  is  a  w^hole- 
souled  American,  loves  his  adopted  country  and  rever- 
ences the  Constitution,  and  is  always  on  hand  to  march 
urder  "Old  Glory"  and  defend  his  country. 

n  LDEE,  HOX.  FERDIXAXD,  son  of  John  and  Anna 
r\  P>.,  born  in  the  city  of  Schwellbrun,  Switzerland, 
'  ^lax  21,  1850.  His  father  was  a  merchant  and 
came  to  Utah  in  L860  and  to  Manti  in  1862;  was  a  clerk 
in  the  Co-op,  Avorker  in  the  Manti  Temple,  and  of  late 
years  bookkeeper  for  L.  T.  Tuttle  &  Co.  Mr.  F.  Alder  was 
engaged  five  years  as  sawyer  in  Franlv  Armstrong's  Mill 
D,  near  Salt  Lake  City,  returned  to  Manti,  bought  a 
sjuall  farm  and  married,  April  26,  1875,  Cecelia  ^radsen, 
daughter  of  Hans  and  Annie,  who  came  to  Manti  in  1853, 
both  now  deceased.  Mr.  Alder  was  elected  Mayor  of 
Manti  in  the  fall  of  1892  and  re-elected  in  1893,  again  in 


96  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

1895  on  the  Republican  ticket.  Is  a  charter  member  of 
A.  O.  U.  W.  of  Manti,  master  workman  two  tenns;  is  in- 
terested in  mining;  lias  been  an  extensive  tie  contractor 
for  tlie  Eio  Grande  Western  railroad.  In  1888  he  built 
a  steam  sawmill  in  Manti  canyon;  also  ran  the  Peacock 
sawmill  until  a  Hood  washed  it  entirely  away;  freighted 
and  traded  produce  to  mining  camps  of  Ctah  and  Nevada 
several  years.  He  has  a  nice  home  and  pleasant  sur- 
roundings; is  kind  and  hospitable,  unassuming,  but  pre- 
sides with  dignity  oA^er  municipal  matters;  a  friend  to 
the  poor,  for  his  hand  never  withholds  cliarity. 

A  Ll)]{ICri,  AMASA,  rounty  Recorder,  son  of  Martin 
r\  and  Hannah  Madsen,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
'  March  16,  1863.     He  attended  the  district  schools 

and  took  a  course  of  one  year  in  the  Deseret  University. 
Taught  school  for  several  years  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  In  1884 
went  on  a  three  years  mission  to  New  Zealand  and 
learned  the  Maori  language.  Was  engaged  as  teacher 
and  in  the  mercantile  business  from  1887  to  1896,  when 
lie  sold  out  and  became  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
Mt.  Pleasant  Equitable  Co-op.  Served  as  postmaster  for 
three  years.  Was  engaged  in  the  sheep  business  for  a 
time.  Is  a  Democrat,  formerly  a  member  of  the  Peo- 
ple's party,  serving  as  city  recorder  for  two  terms.  In 
•96  was  elected  county  recorder,  which  x)osition  he  fills 
with  perfect  satisfaction  to  the  people.  Was  married  in 
Si)ring  City,  February,  '97,  to  Yilate  Maxfield,  whose 
parents  reside  in  Spring  City. 

n  NDERSON,  CHRISTIAN,  farmer  and  engineer  at 
M  ]\[anti  Temple,  son  of  William  and  Henrietta,  was 
/  born  in  Denmark  April  21,  1841.    In  1853  the  fam- 

ily came  to  Utah  with  the  first  large  company  of  Scandi- 
navian emigrants  and  located  in  Manti.  In  1854  Chris- 
tian removed  to  Provo,  remaining  seven  years,  and  re- 
turned. In  1862-3-4  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after 
emigrants.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in 
Company  A,  Cavalry,  two  years.  He  was  in  the  engage- 
uients  in  Salina  Canyon  and  Gra.ss  Valley.  Worked  sev- 
eral years  at  quarrying  rock  for  the  Temple     and    has 


r 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  97 

worked  most  of  the  time  at  the  Temple  since  its  comple- 
tion. Diiriug  the  past  three  years  he  has  been  the  Tem- 
ple engineer.  Performed  a  mission  of  one  year  working 
on  the  St.  George  Temple.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  October  14,  1869,  to  Emilj ,  daughter  of  lUchard  and 
Amelia  Pickering,  born  in  London,  England,  November 
14,  1853.  They  have  ten  children:  Amelia  H.,  wife  of 
Frederick  Slaymaker;  William  E.  married  Mary  J.  John- 
f^on;  Clara  M.,  wife  of  Joseph  Thomas;  Isabel  L.,  Percy 
C,  Edwin  S.,  Emily  L.,  Mehin  W.,  Florence  M.  and 
Elva  G. 

n  XDERSOX,  FREDERICK,  farmer,  son  of  WilUam  and 
ry  Henrietta  Barnson,  was  bom  in  Falster,  Denmark, 
/  Februaiw  11,  1851.    His  parents  emigrated  to  LTtali 

in  1852  and  settled  in  this  city,  where  he  was  raised  a 
farmer.  He  owns  forty-five  acres  and  a  nice  home  in  the 
city.  During  the  past  fourteen  3'ears  he  has  engaged  in 
threshing  grain,  owning  one-fifth  of  a  new  machine.  He 
has  been  a  lumbennan  and  farmer  and  in  politics  is  a 
Democrat.  Has  seiwed  five  years  as  Street  Supeiwisor 
and  was  appointed  again  in  -January,  1898.  He  served 
two  years  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  and  three 
years  Road  Supervisor  for  Manti  district.  His  wife,  whom 
he  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  June  8,  1872,  was  Sarah  A., 
daughter  of  F.  W.  and  Cordelia  Cox,  born  in  Iowa  April 
10,  1851.  They  have  had  nine  children:  Rosella,  Freder- 
ick, Byron,  Cordelia,  Mary,  Lydia,  Emerett  and  Ruth, 
living;  Henrietta,  deceased. 

Q  XDERSOX,  LEWIS,  treasurer  and  superintendent  of 
rl  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Company  of  Manti,  was  born 
/  in  Hickeberg,  Malmo,  Sweden,  October  21,  1850.  The 
family  emigrated  to  this  country  arriving  in  Utah  in 
August,  1859.  They  resided  a  short  time  at  Big  Cotton- 
wood, then  moved  to  Payson,  where  they  resided  till  the 
spring  of  1860,  when  they  removed  to  Moroni,  Sanpete 
County,  where  our  subject  was  engaged  in  such  occupa- 
tions as  farming  and  herding.  Though  only  a  boy  when 
the  Black  Hawk  war  broke  out,  he  did  his  part,  helping- 
herd  the  stock  and  standing  guard.     In  1866  the  family 


98  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

moved  to  Foiiutaiu  Greeu,  where  his  father  established  a 
store,  which  he  couducted  two  years  and  then  sold  to  the 
Co-operative  Mercantile  Institution,  our  subject  continu- 
ing in  the  establishment  as  business  manager  till  1874, 
when  he  opened  a  general  store  of  his  own.  In  1877  he 
sold  out  and  came  to  Manti.  Having  studied  telegraphy, 
he  accepted  a  position  as  operator  and  also  as  book- 
keeper of  the  jManli  Temple,  tlien  in  conrse  of  construc- 
tion. The  years  1874  and  1875  also  1884  and  1885  he 
spent  on  missions  for  the  church,  laboring  in  the  States 
of  Minnesota,  \\'i.sconsin  and  Illinois.  On  his  return 
from  his  last  mission  he  established  a  furniture  stoi"e  in 
Fountain  Gr^een,  which  he  carried  on  three  ^ears.  In  1888 
he  returned  to  Manti  and  accepted  a  position  as  recorder 
in  the  temple  and  is  at  present  also  treasurer. 

He  became  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Utah  A\'ool 
Company  in  181)2  and  was  elected  secretary  and  superin- 
tendent. ^^'hen  the  company  elected  new  officers  in  the 
spring  of  189G,  he  was  elected  to  tJie  ottices  of  treasurer 
and  sui)erintendent,  his  son  Lewis  li.  succeeding  him  in 
the  office  of  secretary'.  Tender  the  present  able  manage- 
ment the  business  of  the  company  is  in  a  vei"y  successful 
condition  and  entirely  satisfactoiy  to  the  stockholders. 
Mr.  Anderson  also  owns  an  interest  in  the  Phoenix 
Flouring  mills  of  Fountain  Green,  is  a  woolgrower  and  a 
stockholder  in  the  ^lanti  Bank.  He  luis  also  found  time 
to  take  a  part  in  political  matters,  being  a  staunch  Re- 
l)ublican.  He  ran  for  a  seat  in  the  first  Utah  State  Legis- 
lature, and  the  following  year  for  County  Clerk,  but  in 
both  instances  the  ticket  Avas  defeated.  He  has  served 
as  Justice  of  the  Peace  and  Town  Clerk  in  Fountain 
Green  and  City  Councillor  in  Manti. 

Mr.  Anderson  was  maiTied  in  Salt  Lake  while  a  resi- 
dent of  Fountain  Green  November  14,  1870,  to  INIary  A. 
Crowther.  Their  children  are  Lewis  R.,  Thomas  J.,  Etta, 
Sarah  J.,  Mary  M.  and  Joseph  F. 

n  XDEKSON,  X.  V^\,  teacher  of  Sixth  grade  in  the  pub- 
r\  lie  schools  of  Manti  City,  is  a  son  of  Neils  and 
/  Ingaborg,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  this  county,  No- 

vember 15,  1858.    When  N.  W.  was  a  small  bov  the  fam- 


HON.    WM.    F.    MAYLETT, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  99 

ily  moved  to  Circle  Valley  to  help  effect  a  settlement 
among  the  Indians,  but  the  settlement  Avas  broken  up 
and  they  returned  to  Ephraim,  where  they  are  now  liv- 
ing. N.  W.  attended  the  schools  of  Ephraim  and  the  B. 
Y.  Academy  at  Provo  one  year,  taught  in  Ephraim  one 
year,  attended  the  Deseret  University  of  Salt  Lake  one 
year  and  then  located  in  Manti,  where  he  has  since 
taught  with  the  excei>tion  of  two  years  spent  as  a  mis- 
sionary in  Sweden.  Is  an  active  worker  in  the  Y.  M.  M. 
I.  A,  and  for  a  time  was  its  secretai-y.  Is  a  member  of  the 
I.  O.  O.  F.  and  was  City  Recorder  eighteen  months.  He 
was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  April  17,  1882,  to  Mary 
E.,  daughter  of  William  and  Mary  Luke,  born  in  Manti 
November  G,  1864.  Their  children  are:  William  E.,  Mary 
G.,  Sheldon  L.,  Floyd  L.,  Wendella,  Doris  A. 

n  NDERSOX,  PETER  11.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son 
M  of  William  and  Henrietta  Barnson,  was  born  in 
f  Denmark  September  26,  1815,  and  came  with     his 

parents  to  Utah  in  1852  in  Capt.  Fosgren's  company.  The 
family  stopped  at  Spring  City  but  were  soon  forced  to  re- 
move to  Manti  by  the  Indians.  He  was  reared  to  the  life 
of  a  far-mer  and  now  owns  218  acres,  with  a  nice  resi- 
dence in  the  city.  Like  many  others,  he  freighted  pro- 
duce to  the  mining  towns  of  Utah  and  Nevada  for  about 
twelve  years.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City  Council  in 
1885-6  and  1889-90.  His  wife  Avas  Esther,  daughter  of 
Albert  and  Esther  Smith,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City  May  9, 
1849.  Her  parents  were  among  the  earliest  settlers,  com- 
ing here  in  1849.  Tliey  Avere  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
December  1,  1866,  and  have  had  thirteen  children,  nine 
living  and  four  dead,  as  folloAvs:  Esther  H.,  wife  of  Ezra 
Funk,  farmer  in  Castle  Valley.  They  have  three  chil- 
dren: Kenneth,  Claude  and  Eva.  She  has  two  children, 
Ethel  and  Esther,  by  a  former  marriage  Avith  George 
CraAvford.  William  H.  married  Annie  Watt;  they  have 
tAvo  sons,  Clarence  and  Hubert.  Izena,  Avife  of  Edward 
E.  Eeid,  has  one  daughter,  Irma.  Alice,  wife  of  Stephen 
Barton,  has  one  child,  EdAvard  S.  Boss,  Franklin  D., 
Eleanor,  Matilda  and  Peter  H.  at  home;  Albert,  John, 
Hubert  and  Milton  beinc'  dead. 


100  HISTORY    or    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

BAKTON,  ALEXANDER,  fanner  and  stockraiser,  son 
of  William  K.  and  Elizabeth  F.,  was  born  in  Manti 
November  10,  1867.  His  parents  emigrated  from 
England  and  about  1857  came  to  Manti,  where  father 
kept  a  small  store  and  managed  a  farm.  Father  joined 
the  Mormon  Church  in  1849  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  and  at 
once  became  a  traveling  elder.  He  was  leader  of  the 
Tabernacle  choir  for  several  years  and  was  one  of  the 
first  to  assist  in  organizing  Sunday  schools.  Took  part 
in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Held  several  offices  as  Alder- 
man and  Justice  of  the  Peace  and  was  a  i)rominent 
churchman.  He  died  December  13,  1887.  Mother  died 
Aj)ril  14,  1896.  Alexander  was  raised  here  and  has  al- 
ways followe<l  farming.  He  owns  a  nice  fann  and  is  ex- 
tensively interested  in  stockraising,  buying  and  selling. 
Was  married  in  Manti  February  2,  1898,  to  Belle,  daugh- 
ter of  Bichard  and  Catherine  Hall,  bom  in  Manti  April 
28,  1878. 

BESSEV,  ANTHONY  WAYNE,  farmer,  son  of  An- 
thony and  Thankful  Stearnes,  was  born  in  Bethel, 
Maine,  August  18,  1835.  Was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
learned  the  trades  of  cabinetmaker  and  shoemaker.  In 
1857  he  came  to  Utah  with  an  ox-train  under  Capt.  Wm. 
Walker,  and  worked  in  Salt  Lake  City  at  shoemaking. 
He  was  a  member  of  the  militia  that  met  Cen.  Cummings 
in  Echo  canyon  when  coming  as  Governor  of  LTtah.  Sep- 
tember 1,  1858,  he  removed  to  iSIanti,  following  his  trade, 
afterward  running  a  threshing  machine  eighteen  years. 
Took  pai-t  in  the  1^1  a ck  Hawk  war,  being  Captain  of  a 
cavalry  company.  He  owns  a  good  40-acre  farm  and 
residence  in  the  city.  Is  a  member  of  the  High  Council 
of  Sanpete  Stake,  and  in  1878  performed  a  mission  to 
New  England.  Served  as  Mayor  of  the  city  two  years, 
elected  in  1873  on  People's  ticket,  and  has  been  a  member 
of  the  City  Council  during  1883,  1884,  1887,  1888,  1889, 
1890,  and  is  at  present  a  Councillor  elected  on  the  Demo- 
cratic ticket.  He  was  married  in  Maine  to  Susan  M., 
daughter  of  Jotham  S.  and  Susan  Willis  Lane.  They 
have  had    eight  children,  Susan    M.,  wife  of  Daniel    M. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  101 

Beach,  Walter  A.  and  Xephi  living,  Anthony  W.,  Charles 
A.,  Kobert  AY.,  Mary  A.  and  Chester  R.,  deceased. 

BENCH,  GEORGE  E.,  SR.,  proprietor  of  the  Bench 
House,  son  of  William  and  Ann,  was  born  in  South- 
ampton, Hampshire,  England,  March  20,  1843.  The 
family  removed  to  the  United  States  in  1851,  residing 
one  year  in  Iowa,  and  in  1852  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the 
plains  in  Capt.  Wimmer's  company,  and  located  in  Mt. 
Pleasant.  In  1853  they  had  to  remove  to  Spring  City  on 
account  of  Indians,  losing  all  their  stock  and  having  to 
move  again  to  Manti,  where  George  has  since  resided. 
He  engaged  in  farming  and  for  tjie  jjast  ten  years  has 
been  in  the  hotel  business  here  and  three  years  in  Salina. 
In  1863  he  went  back  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emi- 
grants. In  1895  he  went  to  England  on  a  two  years' 
iiiission  as  a  traveling  elder.  Served  as  Constable  six 
years.  City  Assessor  and  Collector  ten  years,  City  Water- 
master  nine  and  for  thirteen  years  has  been  assistant 
superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school.  Was  married  in 
Salt  Lake  City  December  19,  1863,  to  Jane,  daughter  of 
Edmund  and  Maria  Horton,  born  in  Leamington,  Eng- 
land, April  18,  1843.  They  have  ten  children:  Eliza  J., 
Esther,  George  E.,  Jr.,  liven^  and  drayman,  born  October 
12, 1869,  married  June  3,  1896,  to  Isabel,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam K.  and  Ann  C.  Barton;  Frank  A.,  Emma  L.,  Mary 
A.,  Ella,  Clarice,  Wilford  and  Jennie. 

BENCH,  JOHN  L.,  Assistant  Recorder  in  the  Manti 
Temple,  also  keeps  a  small  store  in  Manti,  books, 
stationery,  notions,  etc.  He  was  born  June  29, 
1838,  in  Sheep  Wash,  Devonshire,  England,  son  of  Wil- 
liam and  Ann  (Longman)  Bench;  his  father  was  a  black- 
smith. His  parents  joined  the  Mormon  Church  in  Eng- 
land in  1849,  and  the  family  came  to  Utah  in  1852  and 
located  where  only  six  families  were  settled  at  Mount 
Pleasant.  The  family  consisted  of  father,  mother  and 
five  children,  viz.,  John  L.,  William,  George  E.,  Mary 
and  Martha,  all  living  in  Manti  except  Mary,  who  resides 
in  Mexico.  Almost  immediately  after  their  location 
there  they  were  driven  out  by  the  Indians — in  July — all 


102  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

their  stock  Avas  stolen,  and  the  family,  with  the  rest  of 
the  settlers,  brought  to  Manti.  This  Avas  during  the 
''Walker  war,"  which  lasted  'till  the  following  spring, 
during  which  time  he  was  in  the  saddle,  helping  to  pro- 
tect the  settlements.  His  father  died  in  Manti  Decem- 
ber 27, 1875.  He  was  a  man  of  considerable  prominence, 
was  a  member  of  the  City  Council,  1850,  '60,  and  wag 
Captain  of  the  Silver  Grays,  Manti  cliA'ision  of  the  Nau- 
A'oo  Legion;  his  wife  died  in  Manti  January  15,  1886. 
John  L.  was  orderly  sergeant  of  Company  B.  In  1869  he 
was  elected  Alderman,  serA^ed  one  term,  was  .member  of 
City  Council,  1889,  '90;  also  County  Assessor  and  Col- 
lector one  year.  As  a  churchman,  he  has  been  actiA^e; 
vras  Assistant  Su]3erintendent  to  W.  K.  Barton,  the  first 
SViperintendent  of  Sunday  Schools  in  Manti,  and  for  the 
past  tweh'e  years  has  been  Superintendent  of  the  South 
Ward  SunduA'  Scliool.  Went  on  a  mission  to  England 
1882,  returning  in  the  fall  of  1884. 

He  manned  in  Salt  Lake  City  Maria  Kirby,  who 
came  with  her  mother,  Honor  W.  Kirby,  in  the  second 
hand-cart  company,  in  1856.  By  this  union  he  had  five 
cl  ildren,  viz.,  Susie  E.,  Charles  W.  (deceased),  John  L., 
Jr.,  and  Edward,  living,  Urban  L.  (deceased).  His  Avife 
died  in  Manti  Janyaiw  21st,  1878.  Second  Avife,  Louisa. 
Griffin,  Avho  died  in  Manti  November  21,  1886.  He  mar- 
r^'ed  third  Avife  November  27,  1890,  Clara  A.,  daughter  of 
Thomas  and  Rachel  Steer  of  Devon,  England.  Mr.  Bench 
enjoys  in  a  marked  degree  the  confidence  and  good  Avill 
pf  the  people;  always  honest  and  upright  in  his  dealings 
pud  labors  assiduously  for  the  good  of  the  youth  of 
IS'anti. 

BENCH,  ^^'ILLIAM,  Superintendent  of  City  Water 
Avorks,  son  of  William  and  Ann  Longman,  was 
born  in  Southampton,  England,  November  6th, 
1840,  and  emigrated  to  the  United  States  with  his  par- 
ents in  1850.  They  stopped  aAvhile  at  Council  Bluffs, 
Iowa,  and  came  to  Utah  with  Capt.  Wimmer,  arriving 
in  Salt  Lake  City  October  3,  1852.  He  Avorked  for  13 
years  with  his  father,  Avho  Avas  a  blacksmith,  in  Iowa, 
Mt.  Pleasant  and  Manti,  Avhere  they  located  in  August, 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  103 

iS53,  being  driven  out  of  the  northern  settlements  by  In- 
dians. In  1863  he  erected  a  sawmill  and  engaged  in  the 
lumber  business  uutil  1887,  since  which  time  he  has  been 
f<\rming.  He  was  Deputy  County  Assessor  and  Collec- 
tor from  1870  to  1878,  and  January  3,  1898,  was  ap- 
pointed Superintendent  of  City  Water  Works.  He  took 
an  active  part  in  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk  wars, 
holding  the  position  of  First  Lieutenant  under  Capts. 
Beach,  Sidwell  and  Bessey  in  Company  "A,"  cavalry. 

He  was  maiTied  in  Salt  Lake  City,  December  25, 
1862,  to  Frances  A.  Tatton,  daughter  of  John  C.  and  Car- 
oline, who  was  born  in  Reditch,  England,  November  16, 
1843.  Their  children  are  Emma  C,  Frederick  W.,  living, 
and  Mary  H.,  Martha  A.,  John  C,  Francis  A.  and  Fran- 
cis J.,  deceased. 

BILLINGS,  GEORGE  PIERCE,  deceased,  son  of  Titus 
and  Diautha  Morley,  was  born  in  Lake  county, 
Ohio,  July  25,  1827.  The  family  removed  to  Kirt- 
land,  Ohio,  when  he  was  4  years  old,  then  to  Nauvoo, 
Illinois.  He  worked  on  the  Mississippi  river  steamers 
until  18  and  was  selected  for  a  member  of  the  Mormon 
Battalion,  but  on  account  of  an  accident  was  crippled 
and  excused.  Came  to  Utah  in  1817  with  the  fii-st  com- 
pany of  147  and  held  the  plow  that  made  the  first  furrow 
where  Salt  Lake  City  is  situated.  Returned  to  the  Mis- 
souri river  the  same  3  ear  and  brought  his  father  and 
family  to  Utah  in  1848.  In  1849  he  went  to  California 
and  spent  two  years,  returning  to  Farmington,  and  then 
located  in  Manti  in  1851.  In  1856  he  was  called  to  Car- 
son, Nevada,  to  assist  in  settling  that  country,  and  re- 
turned to  Utah  in  1857  and  to  Manti  in  1858.  Was  a 
Captain  and  promoted  to  Major  in  the  Indian  wars,  tak- 
ing an  active  part  in  all  the  skirmishes.  Sened  as 
Sheriff  of  Sanpete  county  twenty-five  years  and  held 
numerous  minor  offices  in  the  church  and  city.  He  died 
in  Manti  December  2,  1896.  Was  man'ied  in  Manti  May, 
1852,  to  Edith  Patten.  She  had  nine  children:  Titus, 
Edith,  Louisa,  George,  Leonard  and  Orson,  living;  Han- 
nah, John  antl  Heber,  deceased.  Second  wife  married  in 
Manti  April  27,  1856,  was  Jeiiisha,  daughter  of  Jezreei 


104  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

and  Nancy  ShomakeT.  She  had  eight  children:  Nancy, 
Isabella,  Luella,  Ezra,  Diantha,  Eunice  and  La  Priel, 
living;  Marion,  deceased. 

BILLINGS,  LEONAED,  City  Marshal,  son  of  George 
P.  and  Edith  Patten,  Avas  born  in  Manti  January 
28,  1865.  His  father  was  one  of  the  pioneers  of 
Utah  and  Sheriff  of  Sanpete  county  for  about  twenty 
years,  taking  an  active  part  in  the  Indian  wars  and  as- 
sisting in  the  erection  of  all  public  buildings.  He  was 
educated  in  the  schools  of  this  city  and  attended  the  B. 
Y.  Academy  at  Provo  two  winters.  He  spent  several 
years  at  placer  mining  in  Tuscarora,  Nev.,  and  on  the  San 
Miguel  river  in  Colorado;  was  contractor  in  building  the 
foundation  of  Fort  Duchesne  barracks  and  returned  to 
this  cit}'^,  where  he  was  married  March  12,  1888.  He  owns 
his  city  residence  and  some  laud.  Is  a  member  of  the  A. 
O.  U.  W.  In  November,  1895,  he  was  elected  City  Mar- 
shal on  the  Republican  ticket.  His  wife  was  Mary, 
daughter  of  Hans  and  Karen  \A'estenskow.  They  have 
had  four  children:  Leonard,  Leora  and  Euth,  living; 
Afton,  dead, 

BOYINGTON,  THOMAS,  deceased,  of  Manti,  was  a 
son  of  John  and  Hannah  (Hadley),  born  in  Cradley 
parish,  Worcestershire,  England,  November  17, 
1881.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  to 
the  land  of  the  Saints  in  1856.  His  journey  to  the  prom- 
ised land  was  accompanied  by  great  hardships  and  priva- 
tions, and  of  the  large  company  who  started  with  Capt. 
Willey,  many  never  survived  to  relate  their  experiences, 
but  perished  of  cold,  hunger  and  fatigue.  Tho^iias  started 
from  Iowa  with  a  hand-cart  containing  100  pounds  flour, 
a  little  bacon,  some  bedding  and  a  very  small  amount  of 
clothes.  Tliey  reached  the  Sweetwater  in  October,  and 
his  provisions  had  long  disappeared,  and  rations  were 
doled  out  from  the  wagons  that  were  along.  At  first  they 
received  one  pound  of  flour  per  day,  this  was  cut  to  half 
a  pound,  and  finally  to  two  ounces.  A  man  cannot  travel 
in  the  cold  over  a  rough  countiy  and  pull  a  hand-cart  f>n 
two  ounces  of  flour  per  day,  so  they  camped  on  the  Sweet- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  105 

water.  Here  some  cattle  had  died  two  jears  before,  and 
the  skeletons  remained  with  the  skins  dried  on  them. 
This  they  pulled  off,  cut  in  strips  and  warmed  over  a  fire, 
and  chewed  to  extract  what  little  glue  might  remain  in 
it.  Manj^  died  of  stai-Aation,  fourteen  were  buried  in  one 
grave  one  morning.  When  Thomas  awoke  one  morning 
he  found  himself  between  two  coii:>ses,  his  companions 
having  passed  silently  away  in  the  still  watches  of  the 
night.  A  rescue  party  from  Salt  Lake  finally  reached 
them,  gathered  them  up  in  wagons  and  brought  them  on 
to  the  city,  where  they  arrived  November  9,  1856.  In 
Februaiy,  1S57,  he  came  to  Manti  Avith  Bishop  Warren 
Snow,  and  worked  for  various  persons  till  he  accumu- 
lated enough  means  to  buy  a  farm.  He  followed  farming 
many  years,  and  built  a  comfortable  home  in  town.  In 
1864  he  returned  to  the  river  for  emigrants.  He  married 
in  Manti,  October  25,  1865,  Hannah,  daughter  of  Rowland 
and  Hannah  (Askew)  Braithwaite,  born  in  Westmore- 
land, England,  May  7,  1839.  Their  children  are  as  fol- 
lows: Thomas  R.,  Hannah  E.,  John  W.,  Robert  A.,  Mary 
E.,  Sarah  A.,  Ida  L.,  deceased,  Amanda  J.  and  Nettie  M. 
Mr.  Boyington  was  a  hard  working,  honest,  upright  man, 
of  a  retiring  disposition,  and  Manti  lost  a  good  citizen 
when  he  died  September  6,  1897. 

BRAITHWAITE,  GEORGE,  City  Sexton,  son  of  Ro- 
land and  Hannah,  was  born  in  Kendall,  Westmore- 
land count}^  England,  March  5,  1834.  He  learned 
the  trade  of  a  shoemaker.  Father  died  in  1852.  The 
family  joined  the  Momion  Church,  he  becoming  a  mem- 
ber in  1847.  In  1863  the  family  came  to  Utah,  crossing 
the  ocean  in  the  Amazon,  the  first  sailing  vessel  char- 
tered from  London  to  carry  Mormon  emigrants.  They 
crossed  the  plains  in  Capt.  Daniel  McCarthy's  company, 
an  ox  train,  arriving  in  Manti  in  October,  1863.  Mother 
died  here  in  1875.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
standing  guard  and  doing  his  share.  Worked  for  nine 
years  in  constructing  the  Temple  and  terraces.  Followed 
his  trade  for  some  time  and  was  City  Sexton  for  several 
years  and  now  occupies  that  position.  Is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Co-op  store.     Was  married  in  Manti  December  4, 


106  HISTOltY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

1864,  to  Sarah  S.,  daiigliter  of  George  and  Mahala  John- 
ston, born  April  18,  1850.  They  have  ten  children: 
George  11.,  John  F.,  Joseph  L.,  Lester,  Ethel,  Mary  A., 
Edward,  Ernest,  Charles  G.  and  Florence. 

BKAITHWAITE,  JOHN  ]?.,  wool  grower,  son  of  Eo- 
land  and  Hannah,  was  born  in  Manti,  December 
5,  1864.  He  was  raised  to  farming,  and  engaged 
in  the  cattle  business.  As  cattle  was  not  remunerative 
lie  changed  to  sheep,  and  now  has  a  herd  of  2,500  head, 
n^ostly  on  shares.  Was  married  in  Manti  temple,  No- 
vember 16,  1889,  to  Annie,  daughter  of  J.  Conrad  and 
Margaret  Kellar,  born  in  Germany,  February  12,  1871. 
They  have  had  four  eliildren,  Margaret,  Leah  and  Fred 
L.,  living;  John  C,  deceased. 

BRAITHWAITE,  JOSP]PH  S.,  beekeeper  and  nurseiy- 
man,  son  of  Roland  and  Hannah,  was  born  in 
Westmoreland  county,  England,  September  14, 
1844.  He  learned  the  trade  of  shoemaker,  which  he  fol- 
lowed several  years  after  coming  here.  The  family  joined 
the  Mormon  Church;  father  died  in  England;  mother 
and  seven  children  came  to  Utah.  They  reached  Salt 
Lake  City  in  October,  1863,  having  crossed  the  plains  in 
Capt.  McCarthy's  company,  and  came  direct  to  Manti, 
where  his  mother  died.  Ho  worked  at  his  trade  some 
years  and  engaged  in  beekeeping  and  nurserying.  Took 
an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Served  as  County 
l^ee  Inspector  for  several  years.  He  is  quite  a  genius  in 
some  things  and  an  expert  entomologist.  Was  married 
in  Manti,  November  18,  1873,  to  Esther,  daughter  of 
Cyrenus  and  Emily  Taylor,  born  in  Manti,  January  25, 
1856.  They  have  had  eight  children:  Izenia,  Melinda, 
Sophronia,'  Herald,  Zella,  Clara  and  Edgar,  living;  Jo- 
seph, deceased. 

BRAITHWAITE,  ROBERT,  slioemaker,  sou  of  Roland 
and  Hannah,  was  born  in  Kendall,  Westmoreland 
county,  England,  March  13,  1830.     He  learned  the 
trade  of  a  shoemaker,  working  with  his  father,  and  after 
his  father's  death  carr-ied  on  the  business.     Joined  the 
jMormon  Church  in  1845  and  in  1854  came  to  Utah,  cross- 


JAMES   COOK, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  107 

iii<i  the  plains  in  an  oxtrain,  under  Capt.  William  Em- 
per.  Followed  bis  trade  one  year  in  Salt  Lake  City,  then 
remoyed  to  Proyo,  where  he  continued  at  his  trade.  In 
the  fall  of  1857  he  came  to  Mahti,  and  had  a  shop  for 
many  years.  He  also  owns  a  farm,  which  is  worked  by 
his  sons.  Was  actiye  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  doing  his 
share.  Is  a  member  of  the  High  Priests'  quorum.  Was 
married  in  Manti,  February  5,  1859,  to  Harriet  A., 
(hiughter  of  Ljness  and  Martha  Bemus,  born  in  Fulton 
county  111.,  September  16,  1811.  They  haye  twelye  chil- 
dren: Martha,  Mary,  Emily,  Robert,  Hattie,  Isabella, 
Lyness,  Eleanor,  Catherine,  John,  Willard  and  Jesse. 


BKAITHWAITE,  \A'ILLIAM,  one  of  the  largest  bee- 
keepers in  Utali,  sou  of  IJoland  and  Hannah, 
was  bom  in  Kendall,  Westmoreland  county, 
England,  May  7,  1812.  He  learned  the  shoemaker's 
trade,  joined  the  Mormon  Church  and  in  1863  came  to 
Utah  with  the  family,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Mc- 
Carthy's ox  train,  readiing  Manti  in  October,  1863.  He 
followed  his  trade  for  about  ten  years,  then  engaged  in 
the  nursery  and  apiary  business,  haying  the  tirst  nursery 
in  ]Manti  and  the  largest  ajnai'y  in  I^tah  Stai'ted  from  one 
swarm.  In  189()  he  had  eight  tons  of  honey.  Has  also 
a  small  market  garden  and  is  a  successful  man  in  all  his 
undertakings.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawiv  war  and 
indirectly  lost  his  right  leg  through  the  war.  In  July, 
1865,  he  went  to  assist  in  settling  Pichtield,  but  was  com- 
pelled to  return  on  account  of  Indians.  Is  a  member  of 
the  High  A'riests'  quorum.  He  studied  euTomology  in 
England  under  Prof.  Butler  and  is  a  thorough  entomolo- 
gist, haying  a  large  collection  of  specimens.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Ivichfield  ^March  18,  18tH ,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter 
of  John  and  Rose  H.  Francis,  born  in  Wednesbury,  Staf- 
fordshire, England,  October  29,  1850.  They  haye  nine 
children:  William  F.,  Rose  A.,  Robeii:  F.,  Charles, 
Elizabeth,  Frank,  Kate,  Mary  and  Martha.  Second  wife 
was  Rose  E.,  daughter  of  James  and  Margaret  Walker, 
born  in  :Mt.  Pleasant  May  11,  1865.  She  has  three  chil- 
dren:   Rebecca,  Sarah  E.  and  Ruth. 


108  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

BKOWN,  HOX.  JAMES  C,  deceased,  was  a  son  of 
James  and  Jane  (Cunningham)  Brown,  bom  in 
Stirlingshire,  Bannoekburn,  Scotland,  January  10, 
1840.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  weaver,  but  followed  it 
only  a  short  time.  When  only  nine  years  old  he  was  left 
an  orphan  and  was  taken  by  an  uncle,  a  carpet  manu- 
facturer, to  live  in  Glasgow.  At  the  age  of  12  he  started 
out  for  himself  and  when  18  he  became  a  Mormon  and 
was  appointed  traveling  elder  in  the  Edinburgh  district. 
He  labored  in  the  interest  of  his  church  until  November, 
1864,  when  he  came  to  this  country,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox  train,  Warren  Snow's  company,  and  located  in 
Manti.  When  tlie  Co-op  store  of  ^Nlanti  was  organized  he 
became  a  stockholder  and  its  first  manager.  He  contin- 
ued with  the  company  eitlua-  as  manager  or  buyer  until 
1880,  when  he  embarked  in  business  for  himself  and 
opened  a  general  store,  which  he  canned  on  until  his 
death,  June  18,  1882,  since  tliat  time  his  wife  has  by  hard 
work  and  careful  business  methods  continued  to  run  the 
business  ami  raise  a  large  family.  After  locating  in 
Manti  Mr.  Brown  continued  to  take  an  active  part  in 
chuT-cli  niatt(^rs  and  was  for  some  years  president  of  the 
quornni  of  Seventies  and  leader  of  the  Manti  Tabernacle 
choir.  He  was  also  prominent  in  political  matters  and 
was  several  years  Justice  of  the  Peace,  City  Recorder  and 
six  years  jNlayor  of  the  city.  He  also  took  his  part  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war.  He  married  in  Scotland  April  14, 
1804,  Miss  Catherine,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Margaret 
(Glen)  Weir;  she  was  born  in  the  city  of  Edinburgh,  Scot- 
land, iMay  8,  1843.  Their  nine  children  were  all  born  in 
Manti  and  are  named  as  follows:  Margaret,  wife  of 
Hugh  ^fcCall;  they  have  two  children,  Earl  and  John; 
James  C.  and  John  G.,  deceaseri ;  Bobert  Bruce  and  Wil- 
liam Wallace,  twins;  Kate,  Claud  C,  a  miller  by  trade; 
James,  deceased,  and  Horace  G.,  a  barber  of  Manti. 
Bruce  learned  the  trade  of  carpenter,  having  served  an 
apivrenticeship  of  five  years  with  Hyrum  Taylor,  most  of 
which  time  he  was  working  in  the  Manti  Temple.  He 
worked  at  his  trade  until  the  fall  of  1893  in  Nephi,  Ogden 
and  Salt  Lake.  He  has  built  himself  a  fine  brick  and 
stone  residence  east  of  the   business   center  at  a  cost  of 


I 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  109 

13000.  He  married  May  2,  1892,  Miss  Belle,  daughter  of 
Edwiu  W.  and  Belle  Fox;  she  was  born  in  Manti  Sep- 
tember 8,  1870.  Their  children  are:  James  C,  born 
March  25,  189:»,  died  September  IT,  1893;  Bruce  F.,  born 
March  5,  1895,  and  Edward  D.,  born  April  1,  1897.  Wil- 
liam W.  learned  the  trade  of  a  plasterer,  at  which  he  is 
a  tirst.-class  workman.  He  married  August  7,  1889,  to 
Alice  M.  Barton,  daughter  of  William  K.  and  Ann  C, 
born  in  ^lanti  January  22,  1869.  Their  children  are: 
Maude  U.,  born  July  5,  1890,  and  Geneil,  June  16,  1893. 
Kate  maiTied  Lee  Kenner;  they  have  one  child,  Vera. 

BUCHANAX,  iJA Y:\r(JND,  sou  of  John  and  Sarah  Wil- 
kinson, was  born  in  Manti  February  3,  1867.  Hi& 
father  was  an  old  resident  of  this  city,  born  in  Lex- 
ington, Ky.,  January  25,  1825,  and  died  here  October  11, 
1897.  He  took  part  in  the  Indian  wars  and  followed  the 
business  of  repairing  wagons  and  farm  implements  till 
his  death.  Raymond  learned  the  trade  from  his  father 
and  has  followed  vaiious  occupations.  He  owns  a  com- 
fortable brick  residence  in  the  western  part  of  the  city. 
His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Manti  November  20,  1889, 
was  Annie  M.,  daughter  of  Fritz  E.  and  Caroline  D.  Niel- 
sen, born  in  Manti  September  2,  1870.  Thev  have  four 
children:  Eoval  R.,  born  October  19,  1890;  Clyde  C, 
December  18,  1892;  Alfonso,  March  25,  1895,  and  Pearl 
E.,  March  30,  1897. 

/QAHOON,  J.  C,  carpenter  and  undertaker,  son  of  Wil- 
\  liam  F.  and  Maiy,  was  born  in  Pottawatamie 
county,  Iowa,  while  the  family  were  en  route  to 
Utah,  October  9,  1817.  The  family  reached  Salt  Lake 
City  in  1848,  in  the  same  company  with  President  Brig- 
ham  Young.  His  parents  resided  in  the  city  for  many 
years  and  died  there,  much  respected  people.  He  was 
brought  up  in  Salt  Lake  City,  where  he  learned  the  trade 
of  a  cai^penter.  In  1869  he  came  to  Manti  and  followed 
his  trade,  with  success.  In  1890  he  engaged  in  the  un- 
dertaking business,  which  he  now  follows,  having  a  neat 
hear&e  and  a  general  line  of  undertakers'  supplies.  He 
served  as  City  Sexton  for  6  years.    He  owns  a  good  farm 


110  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

of  25  acres  and  a  residence  in  the  city.  Was  married  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  Jnne  27,  1868,  to  Ellen,  daughter  of 
Thomas  and  Margaret  Wilson,  born  in  England,  Octo- 
ber 29,  1847.  She  died  in  Manti,  June  13,  1880,  leaving 
G  children:  Margaret,  James  0.,  May  and  Edward,  liv- 
ing; Eva  and  Ellen,  deceased.  Was  married  again,  May 
12,  1881,  to  ]Martha  H.,  daughter  of  Eobert  and  Harriet 
Braitlnvaite.  They  have  had  7  children:  Martha  E., 
AA^illiam,  Stephen,  Leslie,  Orah  and  Leonard,  living;  Lil- 
lian, deceased. 

/QIIKISTEXSEN,  CllAlJLES,  liciuor  dealer,  was  born 
V  in  Norway,  December  23,  1859,  and  emigrated  with 
his  mother  to  Utah  in  1862.  His  father  died  in 
Nomvay,  his  mother,  with  two  other  childn^n,  Gina  and 
Willard,  coming  to  Utah  in  April,  1863,  and  settled  in 
Ephraim.  She  afterwards  married  Hans  I'ehrson  and 
died  in  Ephraim  August  :'>0,  1SS7.  His  brother  John  was 
killed  by  lightning  in  Ephraim.  He  owns  a  40-acre 
farm  and  residence  near  Ephraim  and  his  place  of  busi- 
ness in  this  city.  After  his  marriage,  Afay  21,  1885,  he 
engaged  in  the  cattle  busim^ss,  ran  a  saloon  in  Ephraim 
for  tlire<^  years  and  came  to  this  city  in  1895,  pm'chasing 
his  present  place,  where  he  carries  a  well-selected  stock 
of  wines,  liquors  and  cigars.  His  wife  was  Uosetta  Chris- 
tensen.  Sh<^  died  in  Ephraim,  Jan.  4,  1889,  leaving  two 
daughters,  Ivuby  A.  and  Charlotte  F. 

/QHRISTENSEN,  -ILLirS  H.,  second  son  of  X.  L.  and 
\  Hansine,  was  born  in  AL  voni,  October  12,  1859. 
His  i>arents  were  natives  of  Denmark,  where  they 
joined  the  Monnon  Church,  and  emigrated  to  Utah  in 
1853,  locating  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  1859  they  i^moved 
to  jNToroni  and  in  1864  were  called  to  Richfield,  where  his 
father  Avas  engaged  most  of  the  time  in  guarding  the 
peoi)le  and  property  and  fighting  Indians.  In  1866  the 
family  removed  to  Ephraim,  where  the  mother  died.  His 
father  later  i^moved  to  Redmond,  Sexier  county,  where 
he  now  resides,  being  a  prominent  and  well-known  citi- 
zen. He  is  a  stonemason  and  assisted  in  the  erection  of 
file  temples  at  Salt  Lake  City,  St.  George  and  Manti, 


I 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  Ill 

t^pendillg•  about  twenty  years  ou  the  three  buildings. 
Ji.lius  B.  received  a  common  school  education,  and  at  the 
age  of  17  was  appointed  timekeeper  of  the  Manti  tem- 
ple, during  the  first  year  of  its  constniction.  He  tlien 
attended  the  Deseret  University  for  two  years,  and  re- 
ceived a  diphjma  from  the  normal  depailment.  On  Jan- 
u.^ry  12,  1887,  he  was  married  in  the  Logan  temple  to 
Mary  A.,  daughter  of  X.  P.  and  Elsie  Domgaard,  early 
settlers  of  ^lanti.  They  have  liad  Iavo  cliildren:  Junius 
I).,  deceased,  and  L.  Earl,  living.  Mrs.  Christensen  was 
elected  treasure!"  of  Manti  City  on  the  Democratic  ticket 
at  the  general  election  in  1897. 

Julius  B.  isi  a  Democrat  and  takes  an  active  part 
ill  public  affairs  of  tlie  city  and  county.  He  has  been  en- 
gaged in  various  occupations,  as  freighting,  farming, 
stonecutting,  clerking  and  merchandising,  being  pro- 
prietor of  the  Bee  Hive  store  and  doing  a  good  business. 
He  located,  surveyed  and  constructed  a  canal  at  Red- 
Uiond,  which  terminated  in  the  organization  of  the  West 
Yiew  Irrigation  Company,  incorporated  for  |25,000,  he 
subscribing  for  one-fifth  of  the  stock.  He  is  an  enter- 
l>rising  man  and  a  re])resentative  citizen,  well  and  fa- 
vorably known  throughout  the  county  and  State. 

/QLAKK,  JOHN  HASLlLM,  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  of 
V  Manti,  is  a  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Noddings)  Clark, 
born  in  ].,ee  county,  Iowa,  November  13,  1812.  His 
fi.ther  was  a  native  of  Ireland  and  died  near  Council 
Bluffs,  Iowa.  In  the  spring  of  18G5  our  subject's  brother, 
1'homas,  came  to  ^lauti,  put  in  a  crop  of  grain,  which 
hi  harvested,  and  while  hauling  it  to  Salt  Lake  he  was 
killed,  with  three  others,  by  the  Indians,  at  Uinta 
Springs,  now  Fountain  Green.  Mr.  Clark  came  to  Manti 
vvith  his  mother  in  1851,  and  the  latter  died  here  August 
7,  1858.  Our  subject  has  always  followed  the  business 
cf  farmer  and  stockraiser.  He  has  a  nice  farm  near 
Manti  and  a  comfor-table  home  in  town.  During  the 
Black  Hawk  war  lie  took  his  part  in  the  defense  of  the 
t^  wn.  He  married  in  Manti,  May  1,  1867,  to  Theresa  E., 
daughter  of  Frederick  W.  and  Cordelia  Calista  (Morley) 
Cox.     Their  children  are,  :Maiw  C,  Charlotte,  Ethel  T., 


112  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Frances  E.,  Bichard  H.,  Grace  E.,  Clarice  E.,  Editha  W. 
vnd  Thomas  E. 

/QOOK,  JAMEkS,  retired  wlieehvriiilit,  sou  of  John  and 
V  Sarah,  was  born  in  Shropshire,  England,  November 
13,  1816.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came 
to  Utah  in  Capt.  Joseph  Young's  company,  James  being 
captain  of  ten  wagons,  and  arrived  in  Manti  in  January, 
1854,  with  but  ten  cents.  He  purchased  30  acres  of  land, 
and  he  and  his  Avife  erected  a  rock  and  mud  house,  cov- 
ered with  dirt,  having  cotton  cloth  windows  and  ground 
floor.  During  the  grasshopper  Mar  the  family  of  live 
subsisted  chiefly  on  pigw('ed,  one  loaf  of  bread  lasting 
about  a  month.  He  took  part  in  the  Indian  wars  and  lost 
considerable  stock.  He  owns  his  home  and  residence 
property  in  the  city,  and  is  an  old,  i-espected  citizen.  His 
first  Avife  was  Ann  Lane,  married  in  AVolverhampton, 
Staffordshire,  England.  She  had  nine  children,  Ann, 
widow  of  William  K.  Barton,  Hyrum  and  Maud,  living, 
and  Maiw,  James  X.,  Henry,  Brigham  and  tAVo  unnamed 
infants  deceased.  Second  Avife  Avas  Anna  Davenport,  to 
whom  he  Avas  sealed  but  did  not  live  Avith.  Third  AA'ife 
was  the  daughter  of  Anna,  by  whom  he  had  one  child, 
deceased. 

©OOLIDGE,  OSCAK  E.,  of  Manti,  agent  for  the  Co-op 
\  ^^'agou  and  Macliiu(^  Company,  born  in  Council 
Bluffs,  loAva,  November  10,  1850,  son  of  Joseph  W. 
aEd  Rebecca  (Atwood)  Coolidge.  His  father  was  a  very 
prominent  man  in  his  neighborhood,  merchant  and  mill- 
owner  on  Keg  Creek,  and  for  seAcral  years  was  Probate 
Judge  of  Mills  county,  Iowa.  He  died  in  Iowa  in  1870. 
In  18G4  Oscar  came  to  Utah  in  an  emigrant  train,  his 
mother  and  sister  Alvira  accompanying  him.  His  mother 
married  again  in  Manti,  James  Wareham,  who  was  a 
settler  of  1853,  and  his  sister  maiTied  Frederick  W.  Cox, 
Jr.  They  all  reside  in  Manti.  Mr.  Coolidge  started  a 
small  general  store  in  1868,  and  about  a  year  later  sold 
out  to  the  Co-op.  In  1872  he  formed  a  partnership  with 
George  Sidwell  and  E.  W.  Fox,  and  in  1873  built  the 
lai'ge  stone  store  buildina:  on  Main  street  known  as  Fox's 


HISTORY    OF    SANrETE    COUNTY.  113 

corner.  In  1879  be  sold  out  his  interest.  In  1881  en- 
gaged in  the  liquor  traffic;  liad  James  A.  Barton  as  part- 
ner, until  1889,  when  he  bought  Mr.  Barton's  interest 
and  ran  the  business  alone  till  1893,  when  he  closed  out. 
He  also  carried  on  farming  and  stockraising,  and  in  1891 
began  handling  agricultural  implements — Bain  wagon, 
Wood  &  Champion  harvesting  machinery,  etc.;  also 
buyer  and  shipper  of  sheep.  Married  June  29,  1874,  in 
Salt  Lake,  Isabella  Beach,  daughter  of  Nathaniel  S.  and 
Adaline,  who  Avere  early  settlers.  Mr.  Beach  died  in 
Manti. 

Mr.  Coolidge  has  four  children,  Mary,  Horace  E., 
Chester  C.  and  Oscar  K.  Is  one  of  the  most  modest,  re- 
tiring men,  yet  ever  active  and  shrewd  in  business  and 
has  a  host  of  friends. 

/QOX,  CHAKLES  A.,  farmer,  son  of  Frederick  ^V.  and 
\  Lydia  M.  Locey,  was  born  in  Manti  January  24, 
1857.  He  was  brought  up  to  the  life  of  a  farmer  and 
has  always  tilled  the  soil,  owning  thirty  acres  and  a 
home  in  the  city.  With  two  of  his  brothers  he  engaged 
in  sheepraising  and  followed  the  business  for  seven 
years,  he  sold  out  and  gave  his  attention  to  farming.  He 
is  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Vtah  Wool  Company  and 
the  Union  Eoller  "S\iU.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in 
the  St.  George  Temple  December  1,  1880,  was  Sabra  E., 
daughter  of  Walter  and  Mary  E.  Stringham.  They  have 
three  children:  Ellen  May,  Walter  M.  and  Charles  K., 
living,  Ethel  and  John  being  dead. 

(QOX,  FBAXCIS  M.,  farmer  and  member  of  the  City 
\  Council,  son  of  Frederick  Walter  and  Calista  C, 
was  bora  in  Manti  August  23,  1853.  He  was  the 
first  one  of  the  Cox  family  born  in  Manti.  Was  raised 
here  to  farai  woi-k.  In  1876  he  was  called  to  help  settle 
Brigham  City,  on  the  Little  Colorado  river,  in  Arizona, 
and  remained  three  years,  after  which  he  rteurned  to 
this  city  and  engaged  in  farming.  He  has  built  a  nice 
home  and  is  a  representative  citizen.  During  the  past 
ten  years  he  has  been  engaged  in  woolgrowing.  In  1890 
he  was  elected  a.  member  of  the  City  Council,  and  again 


114  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

in  1807.  Has  ser\  ed  as  president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A. 
and  the  Elders'  Quorum,  and  is  noAV  one  of  the  presidents 
of  the  Forty-eighth  Quorum  of  Seventies.  Was  married 
in  ^lanti  Januiy  12,  1873,  to  Elizabeth  A.,  daughter  of 
Robert  and  Elizabeth  Johnson,  born  in  Manti,  January 
19,  1855.  They  have  two  children:  Francis  M.,  Jr.,  born 
in  Arizona  August  15,  1877,  and  Mary  X.,  born  in  Manti 
July  21,  1880. 

/QOX,  FJiEDElilCK  ^y.,  8K.,  farmer,  of  Manti,  son  of 
X  Frederick  W.  and  Emeline  (^^'hiting),  born  in  Win- 
dom,  PoiTage  county,  Ohio,  November  (J,  1836.  In 
1852  the  family  came  to  Manti,  crossing  the  plains  in 
an  oxtrain,  Capt.  Brown's  company.  After  the  arrival 
of  the  family  here  our  subject  worked  on  the  fann  until 
he  grew  up,  when  he  secured  a  farm  of  his  own  and  also 
engaged  in  lumbering  in  the  neigliboriug  canyons.  Dur- 
ii.g  tlie  Indian  wai-s  he  was  a  Captain,  took  his  part 
with  the  others  and  was  in  five  different  engagements, 
in  one  of  which  AVaiTen  S.  Snow,  Orson  Taylor  and  John 
Frantsen  were  wounded.  A])ril  8,  18G2,  he  went  back  to 
tlie  ^Missouri  i-iver  witli  Jolin  Mur(h)ck  after  emigrants, 
returning  in  October.  Mr.  Cox  was  a  policeman  a  num- 
ber of  years  and  a  member  of  the  City  Council  two  years. 
Lie  has  always  been  active  in  church  work,  and  for  15 
years  was  one  of  the  Presidents  of  the  18th  Quorum 
of  Seventies.  Mr.  Cox  niarri(Ml  two  wives.  First,  Lucy 
Allen,  granddaughter  of  Isaac  Morley.  Their  children 
are  Frederick  W.,  Marion  A.,  Arthur,  Ermina,  Olive  A., 
Rosalind  and  Louis  S.  Second  wife,  Lucy  A.,  daughter 
of  Jos.  W.  and  Rebecca  Coolidge.  Their  children  are 
Howard  L.,  Bruce  E.,  Rebecca  E.,  Alvira  and  Roy.  Mr. 
(■'ox  is  one  of  the  representative  citizens  of  Manti  and  is 
well  liked  by  the  people  he  has  lived  with  45  years. 

/J) OX,  GEORGE  BYROX,  fanner  of  Manti,  is  a  son  of 
\  Frederick  W.  and  Jemima  (Losee)  Cox,  born  in  Pot- 
tawatamie  county,  la.,  November  17,  1849.  In  1852 
the  family  came  in  an  ox  train  across  the  plains  and 
located  in  Manti,  where  George  was  raised  to  farm  work. 
AYhen  he  grew  up  he  secured  a  farm  of  his  own,  and  now 


JOHN     H.     HOUGAARD, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  115 

has  a  fine  farm  of  70  acres,  and  he  was  also  considerably 
interested  in  wool-growing  with  two  of  his  brothers  up 
to  189().  3Ir.  Cox  is  an  enterprising  citizen,  so  naturally 
became  interested  in  many  of  the  business  enterprises  of 
the  city.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mauti  Co-op.  store 
and  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Co.,  in  which  he  was  for  a 
time  one  of  the  board  of  directors.  He  was  Collector  and 
Treasurer  for  the  city  two  years,  member  of  the  C^ty 
Council  and  County  Treasurer  several  years.  He  married 
January  8,  1872,  Susan  L.,  daughter  of  Daniel  and 
Amanda.  Henrie,  who  was  born  in  Manti  April  17,  1853. 
Their  children  are  George  B.  and  Willie  M. 

/QKA\VI'^(H{1),  DAVID  M.,  woolgrower,  son  of  James 
\  and  Catherine  Thompson,  was  born  in  Manti  March 
8,  1859.  He  was  raisefl  on  a  farm  and  at  the  age  of 
15  left  home  and  went  to  Montana,  where  he  engaged  in 
freighting  and  ranching  and  later  in  butchering.  In  1803 
he  returned  to  ^Manti  and  engaged  in  woolgrowing.  He 
now.  owns  about  3000  sheep.  His  wife  was  Jemima  A., 
daughter  of  George  and  Jemima  Eobertson  Scott,  born 
in  Edinburgh,  Scotland,  August  29,  1871.  They  were 
married  in  Manti  January  17,  1894,  and  have  two  chil- 
dren: Violet,  born  February  12,  1895,  and  Mima  A., 
Febiiiary  G,  1898. 

/QKAWFORD,  JAMES,  SR.,  of  Manti,  is  a  son  of  James 
\  and  Elizabeth  (Brown)  Crawford,  born  in  Lanark- 
shire, Scotland,  February  28,  1827.  His  father  was 
a  weaver  and  not  very  well  off  in  this  world's  goods,  so 
our  subject  was  compelled  to  earn  his  bread  at  a  very 
early  age.  At  the  age  of  9  he  was  hired  out  to  herd  cat- 
tle, and  as  he  grew  older  he  worked  on  a  farm  and  also 
at  railroad  grading.  When  a  young  man  he  joined  the 
Momion  church  in  his  native  land,  and  for  some  time  was 
a  traveling  elder.  In  the  fall  of  1818  he  came  to  the 
United  States  and  spent  his  tirst  winter  in  St.  Louis,  Mo., 
and  then  went  to  Council  Bluffs,  where  he  resided  until 
the  spring  of  1851,  when  he  joined  a  company  of  church 
emigrants  under  Capt.  Abraham  Day  and  made  the  trip 
across  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  to  Salt  Lake,  where  he  ar- 


116  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY, 

rived  the  fol lowing  September.  Soon  after  his  arrival  in 
Salt  l^ake  City  he  was  married  November  25,  1851,  to 
Catherine,  daughter  of  \Mlliani  and  Catherine  (Cooper) 
Thompson,  who  Avas  also  a  native  of  Scotland.  Mr.  Craw- 
ford lived  in  Salt  Lake  City  and  Kaysville  till  1857,  when 
he  came  to  Manli.  The  following  spring  he  moved  to  the 
town  of  ^Moroni,  and  his  family  were  one  of  the  first  to 
settle  in  the  new  town,  lie  took  up  land  and  engaged  in 
farming  till  1865,  when  he  was  called  to  help  strengthen 
the  settlements  in  the  Sevier  valley,  and  he  moved  to 
what  is  now  Monroe.  He  built  a  house  and  put  in  a  crop, 
but  the  Indians  were  very  troublesome  at  that  time,  and 
he  did  not  harvest  it,  being  compelled  to  move  to  Manti, 
where  he  has  since  resided.  He  lives  on  the  Main  street 
a  little  soutli  of  the  center  of  the  town,  and  has  a  nice 
little  farm  of  25  acres  near  town.  For  many  years  he 
was  president  of  the  Manti  Co-op.  Sheep-Herding  Institu- 
tion, is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store  and  also  in  the 
Central  T'tah  Wo<d  Comjiany.  In.churcli  matters  he  has 
alwjiys  taken  an  Mc1i\('  i»ait,  for  some  years  he  Avas  super- 
intendent of  tilt'  Sunday  schodl,  and  after  the  organiza- 
tion of  the  Sanpete  stake  he  was  for  many  years  one  of  the 
bisho])'s  coiinsellors,  and  while  in  Moroni  was  counsellor 
to  liisliop  liradley  sevf^ral  years.  To  ^Ir.  and  Mrs.  Craw- 
ford were  born  the  following  children,  all  residents  of 
Manti:  James,  AYilliam  (x.,  jedediah  G.,  David  and  Eli- 
zabeth, Avife  of  Joseph  ^Munk.  September  13,  1892,  Mr. 
Crawford  had  the  msifortune  to  lose  Ms  beloved  wife. 
Mr.  Crawford  comes  from  a  good  old  Scotch  family,  and 
is  a  man  of  sterling  integrity  and  highly  esteemed  and 
respected  by  the  people  of  ]Manti. 

/QlJAAVFOKl),  JAMES,  JK.,  is  a  wool-grower  and  one 
\  of  the  directors  in  the  Manti  City  Savings  Bank.  Is 
a  son  of  James  and  Catherine  Crawford,  and  born 
in  Kaysville,  T'tali,  August  28,  1853.  His  parents  were  na- 
tives of  Scotland  and  came  to  this  country  in  1848,  and 
settled  in  Utah  in  1851.  A  sketch  of  James  Crawford, 
Sr,,  appears  on  another  page.  The  family  came  to  Manti 
in  1857,  but  the  following  spring  moved  to  Moroni,  after 
a  residence  there  of  about  eight  years  they  joined  a  col- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  117 

oiiY  and  helped  settle  the  town  of  Monroe,  Sevier  Coun- 
ty. The  year,  1865,  again  found  them  residents  of  Manti, 
where  the  family  have  since  continued  to  live.  The  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch  has  always  followed  the  occupation 
cf  farming,  and  has  at  present  a  fine  farm  of  seventy 
acres,  three  miles  from  Manti.  He  started  in  the  sheep 
business  also  in  which  he  has  been  veiy  successful  hav- 
ing at  present  about  6000  head  of  sheep.  Mr.  Crawford 
has  built  for  himself  one  of  the  finest  modern  residences 
in  the  city,  constructed  of  pressed  brick,  and  stone  trim- 
n]ings,  costing  about  |6500,  and  situated  on  the  Main 
street  near  the  center  of  town.  He  has  a  very  fine  orchard 
in  the  city.  When  the  Manti  City  Savings  Bank  was  or- 
ganized he  became  one  of  its  board  of  directors,  and  is 
also  one  of  the  stockholders  in  the  Central  Utah  Wool 
Company. 

Mr.  Crawford  is  considered  one  of  Manti's  most  re- 
liable and  enterprising  citizens.  He  was  married  in  Salt 
Ltke  City,  March  13,  1876,  to  Miss  Christina,  daughter 
of  Ole  and  Annie  Madsen,  by  whom  he  has  six  children  a« 
follows:  Kate,  Stanley,  Edmund,  Christina,  Margaret 
ard  Alta.  Mrs.  Crawford's  parents  both  died  in  Manti, 
^vhere  they  located  in  1863. 

/Q  liA^N'FORD,  JEDEDIAH  G.,  of  Manti  City,  is  a  son 
\  of  James  and  Catherine  (Thompson)  Crawford  and 
.  Avas  born  in  Kaysville,  Utah,  March  2,  1857.  The 
family  moved  to  Manti  the  same  year  our  siibject  was 
born  and  shortly  after  to  Moroni,  where  they  resided 
eight  years,  and  thence  to  Monroe,  Sevier  County,  but 
were  compelled  to  leave  there  by  the  Indians,  and  in  1865 
they  returned  to  Manti,  where  they  now  reside.  Our 
subject  was  raised  to  the  occupation  of  farming;  when 
he  grew  up  he  engaged  in  the  cattle  business,  but  soon 
changed  to  wool-growing,  in  which  he  has  been  very 
successful,  now  owning  about  3000  head  of  sheep.  He 
has  built  a.  very  nice  residence  for  his  family  west  of  the 
center  of  town.  Mr.  Crawford  is  of  thrifty  Scotch  ex- 
traction and  by  his  energy  and  perseverance  has  become 
quite  well  off.  In  any  enterprises  calculated  to  build  up 
and  benefit  the  city  he    always  takes  a  leading  part,  so 


118  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

he  is  a  stockholder  in  nearly  eveiy  corporation  in  the 
city.  He  was  one  of  the  incoii^orators  of  the  Central 
Utah  Wool  ('onii)anY,  of  the  Manti  City  Sayinj^s  Bank, 
the  new  Union  Roller  ]Mills,  the  Manti  l*nblishino  Com- 
pany, aiid  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Orani>eYille  Honr- 
ing  mills  in  Emery  Connty,  where  he  resided  from  1883 
to  1S!)0,  engaged  in  stock  business  and  wool-gro\ying. 
]\rr.  Crawf<(i(l  >vas  married  in  St.  George,  l^tali,  October 
27,  1881,  to  Hannali  E.,  daughter  of  Amasa  E.  and  Olive 
D.  (Lytle)  ^Meniam,  born  in  San  Bernardino,  California, 
Noyember  14,  18(;i.  Six  children  haye  been  born  to  them, 
Ella  May,  born  July  2"),  1SS2,  EchYin  M.,  born  September 
12,  18S4;  Jennie  1..,  born  October  22,  1S8U;  Jedediah  G., 
born  January  (J,  1S})0;  Melvin,  born  October  24,  1894,  and 
died  December  1(1,  18<»4;  Lura,  born  February  19,  1897. 
^Mrs.  (Va\yford's  father  died  in  Manti  February  2,  1897; 
motliei-  still  li\ing. 

/T\  KAWFORI),  JOHN,  farmer,  of  .Manti,  is  one  of  a  fam- 
V.  ily  of  four  and  was  born  in  ^^'ickston,  Beebleshire, 
Scotland,  Se]>tember  30,  1829.  His  parents  were 
James  and  Elizabetli  (Bro\Yn)  Cra\Yfoi-(l.  1 1  is  fatlnn'  was 
a  liax  \Yea.yer,  making  fancy  linen  cloth.  John  spent  the 
early  years  of  his  life  on  a  farm  till  he  was  16  yeai's  of 
age,  and  when  14  joined  th<'  ^Mormon  church.  He  worked 
at  track-laying  on  the  railroad  till  tlic  fall  of  1849,  when 
he  emigrated  to  the  United  States,  coming  across  from 
Liverpool  in  the  sailing  yessel  Zetlin.  The  yo3'age  took 
six  weeks  and  two  days  and  he  landed  in  Ne^y  Orleans 
on  Christmas  day,  1849.  He  journeyed  up  the  Mississippi 
riyer  to  St.  Louis,  where  he  remained  the  balance  of  that 
winter.  In  the  spring  he  continued  up  the  river  to  Kains- 
ville,  where  himself  and  brother  James  rented  a  farm 
and  i)ut  in  ten  acres  of  wheat  and  twenty-five  acres  of 
corn.  In  July  Kinkade  and  Livingston  fitted  up  a  train 
of  tliii-t.v-five  wag<tns  drawn  by  ox  teams  to  haul  mer- 
chandise to  Salt  Lake  and  John  hired  out  to  them  to 
drive  one  of  the  teams  of  four  yoke  of  oxen.  They  left 
old  Fort  Kearney  on  the  Missoui-i  August  3rd.,  A.  O. 
Smoot,  late  of  Prove,  being  their  captain,  and  arrived  in 
Salt  Lake  City  September  28th.     That  Avinter  he  worked 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  119 

iu  Mill  Civt-k  cauyou  at  the  lower  sawmill  for  Barney 
Adams.  In  the  spring  of  1851  himself  and  Alex  Cowan 
took  a  contract  of  Bishop  Hunter  and  made  the  adobes 
for  the  old  Tabernacle  in  t^alt  Lake  City,  which  was  the 
tirst  church  built  in  Utah.  It  was  constructed  on  the 
ground  where  the  Assembly  Hall  now  stands.  In  the 
spring  of  1852  himself  and  brother  James  rented  the 
farm  of  Apostle  C.  C  Kich  at  Centerville,  which  they 
Avorked  for  two  seasons.  When  the  Walker  Indian  war 
broke  out  in  the  summer  of  1853  he  was  one  of  a  com- 
pany of  about  thii'ty-flve  called  by  Governor  Young  to  go 
to  Manti  to  strengthen  and  support  the  settlement.  They 
were  instructed  to  sell  all  their  possessions  so  they 
Avould  liav(^  nothting  to  return  to.  This  company  was 
gathered  from  the  towns  near  Salt  Lake  and  our  subject 
made  captain.  They  an'ived  in  Manti  the  latter  part  of 
December,  1853,  and  found  the  snow  eighteen  inches 
deep.  They  spent  the  balance  of  that  winter  in  standing 
guard  and  building  a  fort.  In  May  of  1855  he  was  called 
with  about  fifty  others  upon  a  mission  to  the  Elk  moun- 
tains to  live  among  the  Indians  to  try  and  civilize  them. 
September  23rd  the  settlement  was  broken  up  and  they 
were  driven  out  by  the  Indians,  who  killed  James  W. 
Hunt,  William  Behunnin  and'  Edward  Edwards  and 
wounded  A.  X.  I>illings,  the  president  of  the  mission.  The 
Indians  burned  all  their  hay  and  stole  their  cattle.  In 
1857  he  with  Harmon  T.  Christensen,  N.  Beach  and  B. 
Hall  received  a  charter  from  the  city  to  construct  and 
maintain  a  toll  road  up  City  Creek  canyon.  This  road 
they  constructed  about  eight  miles  and  the  following 
year  the^'  built  a.  sawmill  in  the  canyon  wdtli  a  gig  saw. 
They  cut  from  2000  to  3000  feet  of  lumber  per  day,  Mr. 
Crawford  being  the  sawyer.  They  owned  and  operated 
this  mill  nearly  ten  years.  AYhen  the  Temple  was  being- 
built  he  ran  a  lime  kiln  five  miles  west  of  town,  burning 
all  the  lime  used  for  the  Temple  for  nearly  five  years. 
During  all  these  years  his  family  looked  after  the  farm 
and  carried  it  on  successfully.  He  has  been  engaged  in 
the  cattle  and  sheep  industry  and  has  now  a  band  of 
about  1500  head  of  sheep.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the 
new  Union  Roller  Mills,  was  a  member  of  the  City  Conn- 


120  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

€il  three  terms,  Justice  of  the  Peace  two  terms.  .  Mr. 
Crawford  has  been  prominent  in  the  cliurch,  being  presi- 
dent of  the  Forty-eighth  quorum  of  Seventies  about 
thirty  years  and  a  ward  teacher  many  years.  He  was 
married  April  (i,  1853,  to  Cecelia,  daughter  of  Nathaniel 
and  Cecelia.  Sharp.  Their  children  are  Elizabeth  J., 
John,  Jr.,  deceased,  Cecelia,  James  B.,  Nathaniel,  Wil- 
liam W.,  Margaret  C,  Mary  E.,  Quincy  G.,  Delphia,  de- 
ceased, and  Catheriue. 

In  February,  IS.KJ,  he  married  a  second  wife,  Eliza- 
beth, daughter  of  (rardner  and  Sarah  (Hastings)  Snow. 
Their  children  are:  Sarah  M.,  Maiy,  deceased,  Martha  M,, 
Gardner  J.,  George,  deceased,  Charles  C,  Ida,  deceased, 
Adelbei-t.  I>.,  Nora  A.,  Fraidc,  Grace  and  Rayfleld,  de- 
ceased. 

It  may  truly  be  said  of  Mr.  Crawford  he  has  made  a 
suc<*ess  of  life,  having  no  capital  to  start  with,  he  had 
nothing  but  his  individual  effort  to  depend  on.  By  steady 
hard  work  and  lutnorablc  means  he  has  accumulated  a 
fair  stock  of  this  Avorld's  goods  and  has  always  retained 
the  respect  and  good  will  of  his  neighbors. 

YQRAWFORD,  WILLIAM  G.,  is  one  of  the  leading 
^^  woolgroweis  of  Manti.       He  is  a  son  of    James 

Crawford  and  Catherine  (Thompson)  Crawford, 
and  was  born  just  north  of  Salt  Lake  City,  December 
24,  1854.  When  he  was  three  years  of  age  the  family 
moved  to  Manti  and  shortly  after  to  Moroni,  where  they 
v/ere  among  the  first  settlers,  and  resided  there  eight 
years,  when  they  removed  to  Monroe,  Sevier  county, 
which  was  then  just  being  settled.  In  1865  they  again 
took  up  their  residence  in  Manti,  where  they  have  since 
lived.  Our  subject  followed  various  occupations  in  Idaho 
and  Salt  Lake  City,  where  he  attended  the  Deseret  Uni- 
versity a  few  months.  He  then  returned  to  Manti  and 
■<!fincluded  to  go  into  the  stock  business.  He  secured  a 
small  herd  of  about  65  head,  but  the  following  winter 
being  a  xery  severe  one,  he  lost  about  one-half  of  them. 
This  rather  discouraged  him  in  the  stock  business,  so  he 
bought  a  small  band  of  sheep  and  took  a  few  more  on 
shares,  and  by  dint  of  hard  work  and  close  attention  to 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  121 

b.smess  lie  was  very  successful  aud  finally  Ms  flocks 
uumbered  over  GOOO.  Mr.  Crawford  is  now  one  of  Manti 
City's  most  influential  and  substantial  citizens.  He  has 
built  a  veiT  nice  home  one  block  east  of  the  bank,  and 
is  interested  in  various  enterprises  which  help  to  build 
up  the  town.  He  helped  establish  the  Manti  City  Savings 
liank  and  became  one  of  the  leading  stockholders.  He 
also  was  one  of  the  originators  of  the  Central  Wool 
company,  in  wluch  he  is  one  of  the  board  of  directors. 
He  was  married  in  Manti  January  29,  1ST9,  to  Calista 
C,  daughter  of  Frederick  ^A'.  and  Calista  C.  Cox.  They 
have  a  family  of  six  children,  Bertha,  William  L.,  David 
D.,  Evelyn,  Ruth  and  Bryant  F.  Mrs.  Crawford's  parents 
v.ere  among  the  early  settlers  of  Manti,  a  sketch  appear- 
inii-  elsewhere  in  this  work. 


/J)lL\\\'F01iiJ,  \\1LL1AM  W.,  druggist  aud  registered 
V^  l)harmacist,  son  of  John  and  Cecelia,  and  born  in 

Manti,  September  11,  1863,  was  raised  on  the 
farm,  attended  district  school  at  home,  spent  two  winters 
at  the  B.  Y.  Academy,  Provo,  and  one  year  at  the  Utah 
University  in  Salt  Lake  City.  Taught  school  one  year 
Cit  Orangeville,  Emeiy  county,  returned  and  spent  five 
months  at  the  University  again,  then  taught  two  years 
at  Orangeville.  He  married  in  Logan,  May  26,  1886, 
Ellen  I.  Callaw  ay,  daughter  of  Levi  H.  and  Mary,  of  Em- 
erj  county.  They  have  had  five  children,  Mary  C.  (de- 
ceased), Zella,  Jessie^  Kate  and  William  E.  He  was 
County  Clerk  of  Em^^ry  county  four  years,  then  taught  in 
Orangeville,  where  he  opened  a  drug  store,  studied  phar- 
macy and  passed  a  successful  examination  before  the 
State  Board  of  Pharmacy,  August  14,  1884.  In  Septem- 
ber, same  year,  opened  his  present  store  in  Manti,  next 
dnor  to  the  postoffice;  carries  general  drugs,  patent  med- 
icines, staiionery,  perfumes  and  toilet  articles.  Is  a 
member  ol  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  and  is  the  present  Master 
^.'orkman  of  Manti  Lodge  No.  23;  has  also  been  Lodge 
Financier.  Mr.  Crawford  is  one  of  our  solid  men,  en- 
ergetic in  business,  strictly  upright  and  draws  to  him- 
self friends  in  abundance. 


122  HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

DAYEXIH)KT,  SAMUEL,  farmer,  son  of  James  aud 
Hannah  Massey,  was  born  in  Lancashire,  England, 
November  18,  1845.  In  1861  lie  came  to  Ttali, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  oxtrain,  under  Capt.  Murdock. 
He  learned  the  hatter's  trade  in  Salt  Lake  Cit}',  aud  fol- 
lowed that  for  some  time  after  coming  to  this  city  in 
1864.  He  owns  about  50  acres  of  land,  besides  one- 
fourth  block  and  a  comfortable  home  in  Manti.  During 
the  Indian  wars  he  took  an  active  part  in  guarding.  On 
December  23,  1870,  he  was  marrted,  in  this  city,  to  Sarah, 
daughter  of  Samuel  and  Phoebe  Mackey,  born  in  Penn- 
sylvania., March  17,  1850.  They  have  had  twelve  cnil- 
dren:  Samuel,  EdAvin,  Sarah  J.,  wife  of  John  Eoyiugton; 
Ann,  Joseph,  James,  Elizaln'th,  Alice,  Ethel  and  Mi- 
randa, living;  Mavy  E.  and  William,  dead. 

DE  MILL,  ELIAS,  of  ]Manti,  sou  of  Freeborn  aud  Annie 
(Kniglit),  was  bom  in  Caldwell  county,  Mo.,  Janu- 
aiy  12,  1838.  His  parents  joined  the  ^lormon 
church  about  one  year  after  it  was  founded,  and  w(*re 
neighbors  of  J<)se]tli  Sinitli.  The  family  were  through 
the  ^lormon  i)ersecutious  aud  lived  in  Jackson  county, 
Kirkland  and  Nauvoo.  Father  helped  build  the  Kirk- 
land  aud  Nauvoo  temjdi^s.  In  the  si)riug  of  1850  the 
l)areuts,  with  their  two  sons  and  two  daughters,  started 
for  rtah,  and  reached  ^Liuti  late  in  the  fall.  Tliey  took 
up  a  j)iece  of  land,  and  father  was  engaged  in  farming 
and  church  work  till  his  death  Januaiw  17,  1882;  mother 
died  July  17,  1880.  The  family  endured  all  the  priva- 
tions incid<'ut  to  pioneer  life,  au<l  duiiug  the  grasshopper 
plague  saw  many  days  when  thf^y  had  nothing  but  greens 
to  eat.  During  the  Indian  troubles  Elias  took  part  and 
helped  pursue  the  Indians  after  manv  of  their  raids.  He 
has  been  engaged  in  farming,  OA\niug  a  nice  farm  near 
town.  He  married  June  12,  1863,  ^Talvina,  daughter  of 
Oyrus  and  Catherine  (Hulett)  Winget,  bor-n  in  Nauvoo, 
111.,  December  11,  1843.  Their  children  are  E.'iza,  Eliza- 
beth, Perintha,  jMonroe,  Leroy  and  Edwin. 

Mrs.  De  ^lill's  parents  came  to  Utah  in  1847  in 
Charles  C.  Rich's  company.  They  started  with  tL  eir  own 
team  of  four  oxen;  when  they  arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City 
they  had  one  ox  and  a  cow  hitched  together. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  123 

DYliENG,  P.  P.,  was  boru  in  the  district  of  Hedemar- 
ken,  Xoi-M'a^',  June  19,  1857.     His  fatlier,  Peter  B. 
Dvienjj;-,  who  was  a  tailor  by  trade,  was  burned  to 
death  in  a  mill  in  the  old  country  when  I'eter,  Jr.,  was 
but  a  small  boY. 

At  the  age  of  sixteen  years  the  subject  of  our  sketch 
.<-ame  to  America  and  located  at  Manti.  He  followed 
various  occupations  for  a  livelihood  until  the  organiza- 
tion of  the  Manti  City  Savings  Bank,  wh.en  he  became  a 
stockholder  in  the  institution  and  soon  after  he  was  ap- 
pointed assistant  cashier  and  served  in  that  capacity  un- 
til the  death  of  the  cashier,  Albert  Tuttle,  January  1, 
18D5,  when  he  was  i)romoted  to  the  vacancy,  which  posi- 
tion he  now  holds. 

Besides  attending  to  his  duties  in  the  bank,  Mr. 
Dyreng  owns  and  manages  a  farm  near  Manti,  has 
helped  establish  the  Manti  Co-operative  Boiler  Mills  and 
is  interested  in  various  other  enterprises  which  assist  in 
building  up  the  city  and  coiinty.  He  was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City  in  1882  to  Miss  Maria  Kjar,  and  six  children 
were  born  to  them,  as  follows:  Lizzie,  Lenore,  Bay, 
iMabel,  Buby  and  Ivan. 

Mr.  Dyreng  has  held  many  offices  of  trust,  among 
others  being  that  of  member  of  the  City  Council.  He  is 
an  example  of  the  poor  boy  rising  by  grit  and  persever- 
ance to  a  ]>osition  in  the  front  rank,  not  only  as  a  citizen, 
but  as  a  business  man. 

FELT,  NATHANIEL  H.,  general  merchant,  son  of 
Nathaniel  H.  and  Mary  (Pile),  Avas  born  in  Salt 
Lake  City  December  2,  18(52,  where  he  was  educated 
and  spent  liis  boyhood.  His  father  was  one  of  the  early 
cashiers  of  the  Z.  C.  M.  I.  and  many  years  member  of  the 
City  Oouncil.  Hariw,  as  he  is  known,  went  to  Provo, 
opened  a.  stationeiw  store  in  1880,  which  he  kei)t  for 
three  or  four  years,  and  returned  to  Salt  Lake  City.  In 
1890  he  came  to  Manti,  purchasing  an  interest  in  the 
Sentinel,  finally  buying  the  plant  and  conducting  the 
paper  in  company  with  Ward  Stevenson  and  Hial  (t. 
Bradfor(..  He  sold  out  to  his  partners  and  opened  his 
present  place  of  business,  where  he  carries  an  excellent 


124  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

stock  of  fancy  and  staple  groceries  and  notions.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  A.  O.  C  \V.  and  a  genial  business  mau. 
In  compauy  with  John  Giles,  he  has  constructed  a  tine 
opera  house  in  the  reai-  of  his  place  of  business.  He  was 
married  in  Logan,  December  2,  1887,  to  Elvira  Clark, 
daughter  of  Thomas  B.  and  Sai'ah,  a  native  of  Provo. 
They  have  four  children:  Harold,  Thomas  B.,  A'enice 
and  Roger. 

FOX,  EDW'AlvI)  \\.,  for  fourteen  years  was  County 
Surveyor,  bom  in  the  village  of  Philadelphia,  Jef- 
ferson county,  X.  Y.,  August  1st,  1833.  His  father 
Vvas  a* carpenter  and  joined  the  Mormon  Church  early  in 
the  follies,  and  the  family  moved  to  Xauvoo  in  1844, 
where  both  parents  died  in  1845.  Edward  went  with  his 
uncle,  Jesse  W.,  to  his  birthplace,  where  he  received  a 
common  school  education.  In  1848,  his  uncle  came  to 
8alt  Lake  City,  and  Edward  followed  the  same  year, 
driving  an  ox  team  in  George  A.  Smith's  company  of 
fift^^  wagons.  He  learaed  ^ui"\'eying  under  the  tutorship 
of  his  uncle,  and  in  Salt  Lake  City,  under  Gen.  David 
II.  BuiT,  tlie  first  U.  S.  Surveyor-General  for  Utah.  In 
the  fall  of  1850  he  came  to  3Ianti,  and  in  1851  went  to 
Mount  Pleasant  and  engaged  as  sawder  in  the  Hamble- 
ton.  Potter  &  Lowry  sawmill,  where  he  remained  about 
two  years,  thence  to  Salt  Lake,  and  herded  cattle  in 
Idaho  on  the  Bannock  river.  Aftenvards  attended  school 
m  Salt  Lake,  taught  by  George  Mousley;  studied  survey- 
ing, and  then  came  to  Manti.  His  uncle,  Jesse  W.,  did 
the  first  suiweying  in  Manti  and  laid  off  the  city  one  mile 
square,  and  taught  scliool  there  the  winter  of  1850;  he 
died  in  Salt  Lake  City  in  1894. 

Edward  was  elected  County  Surveyor  the  fall  after 
his  return,  and  was  the  first  Surveyor  of  Sanpete,  which 
office  he  held  for  fourteen  years;  was  also  Assessor  and 
Collector  for  the  county;  was  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
I'il  1861,  '62,  1871  '72;  was  City  Treasurer  one  term.  Was 
Irternal  Revenue  Collector  for  this  district  about  eight 
Tears;  postmaster  of  Manti  about  eight  years.  Was  as- 
sociated witli  L.  T.  Tuttle  in  general  merchandising, 
opening  the  first  general  store  in  Manti;  afterwards  sold 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  125 

out  to  tlie  Co-op;  was  also  associated  with  R.  L.  By  bee 
a  short  time  in  general  merchandise.  He  and  Mr.  Bybee 
took  a  contract  to  grade  about  one  mile  of  the  Salina 
branch  of  the  K.  G.  W.  E.  R.  in  Salina  camou.  They 
also  graded  about  three  miles  on  the  Buck  Horn  Flat  in 
Castle  Valley. 

He  is  one  of  the  stockholders  of  the  new  Union  Rol- 
ler mill  in  Manti.  He  married  in  Manti,  July  4,  1860, 
Belle  Peacock,  daughter  of  Hon.  George,  and  his  wife 
Sarah;  by  her  he  had  ten  children,  Edward  W.,  George 
D.,  Hellen,  Jesse  W.,  Belle,  Zella,  lone,  Leslie,  Clinton 
and  Harrison.  Mr.  Fox  was  actively  engaged  in  the  In- 
dian wars  and  Avas  a  Colonel  of  Infantry.  He  carries  on 
faiTuing,  has  a  fine  farm  of  sixty  acres  near  Manti  and 
Itas  a  good  home.  Is  quiet  and  unassuming,  though  a 
man  of  weight  in  his  sphere,  and  has  proven  himself  true 
to  his  honest  convictions  and  enjoys  the  esteem  of  his 
airsociates. 

M  ALL,  JOHN,  farmer,  stock-raiser  and  wool-grower, 
jl  son  of  Richard,  Sr.,  and  Ann  Bordley,  was  born  in 
/  Yorkshire,  Enghmd,  November  22,  1S31».    The  fami- 

ly came  to  the  United  States  in  1850  and  located  at  St. 
Louis,  Mo.,  where  his  father,  who  was  a  stonecutter, 
owned  and  operated  a  quariw.  His  parents  united  with 
the  Mormons  and  came  to  Utah,  stopping  at  Rrovo  in 
1852,  and  ^Nlanti  in  1851.  He  was  fond  of  teaming,  and 
made  three  trips  to  the  Missouri  river  for  merchandise 
and  emigrants,  besides  freighting  to  the  mining  towns 
of  Utah  and  Nevada.  He  took  an  active  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  and  has  carried  on  farming,  stock-raising  and 
wool-growing.  Owns  a  nice  50-acre  farm,  a  residence  in 
the  city,  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Wool  Co.,  and  has 
about  2500  sheep.  Ser-ved  as  Deputy  City  Collector  and 
Treasurer  for  eight  years.  Deputy  County  Collector 
twelve  years,  and  Deputy  Assessor  ten  years. 

His  wife  was  Almira,  daughter  of  John  H.  and  Sabra 
A.  Tuttle,  born  in  Garden  Grove,  Iowa,  November  2o, 
1847.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  December  1, 
18(50,  and  have  had  twelve  children,  Sabra  A.,  wife  of 
Andrew  H.  Miller,  Myra,  wife  of  Nephi  Bessey,   Mary, 


126  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

John  H.,  Luther  'J'.,  maiiied  to  Lilly  M.  Barton,  William 
T.,  Welinj;ton  L.,  Fred  M.,  Clara  T.,  living,  Elizabeth 
E.,  Edna  G.  and  Kichard  L.,  deceased. 

M  ALL,  KKllAKl),  .SK.,  of  Manti,  was  born  in  York- 
[1  shire,  England,  near  Wakefield,  August  10,  1817. 
'  He  learned  the  trade  of  stone  cutting  from  his 

father  and  foUoAved  it  many  3  ears  in  England.  He  mar- 
ried Ann  Boardler,  and  two  of  their  children  are  now 
living  in  Manti,  John  and  Richard,  Jr.  He  joined  the 
Mormon  Church  about  1840  and  in  1849  started  for 
Utah.  They  sto])i)ed  two  years  in  St.  Louis,  where  his 
u  ife  died.  In  1851  he  again  started  for  Utah,  and  on  the 
v.ay  he  married  and  buried  his  second  wife,  Eliza  Brooks. 
He  located  in  ProAo  about  two  years  and  in  1853  came  to 
Manti,  where  for  many  years  lie  followed  his  trade  of 
builder.  He  helped  build  the  fort  walls  and  many  of  the 
stone  buildings  of  the  city,  including  the  Co-op  store  and 
the  large  meeting  house.  He  helped  on  the  construction 
of  the  two  magnificent  t<'niples  at  St.  George  and  Manti. 
Mr.  Hall,  Jcdin  Crawford  and  X.  Beach  built  the  first 
saw  mill  at  ^Manti,  located  in  jNIanti  canyon.  He  passed 
ti trough  all  the  hardships  incident  to  early  life,  includ- 
ing the  Indian  wars  and  the  grasshopper  plague.  He  has 
a  s]d('udi<l  farm  adjoining  the  city  on  the  north,  where 
he  lives  in  a.  large  old  stone  house.  Mr.  Hall,  although 
past  80  years  of  age,  is  quite  active,  and  in  the  many 
years  of  his  residence  in  ]\ranti  he  has  built  up  a  reputa- 
tion for  truth  and  honorable  dealings  that  will  stand  as 
a  monument  long  after  he  has  passed  from  the  scene  of 
action.  Mr.  Hall  married  again  after  coming  to  Salt 
Lake,  a  Miss  Sarah  Bell,  who  died  in  Manti  in  1896. 
H(  again  married  in  Manti  to  Catherine  Jack.  They  have 
seven  children,  Joseph,  Mary,  William,  Catherine  B., 
Thomas  D.,  James  and  Jessie. 

IJ  AXSEX,  JEXS  J.,  wagon-maker,  Manti,  son  of  Jens 
jl  and  Charlotte  (Peterson)  Hansen,  was  born  in  Manti 
/  June  19,  1863.  The  parents  came  to  Manti  in  1853 
with  the  first  Scandinavian  emigrants.  There  is  in  the 
family  three  sons  and  five  daughters,  all  living  in  Manti 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  127 

excei)t  one  sou,  iu  Enieiv  County.  The  father  died  Xo- 
veniber  'M),  1SS4,  mother  still  liviuu  in  ^lauti.  Our  sub- 
ject was  raised  to  farm  Avork  and  when  22  years  of  ai^e 
he  learned  his  trade  under  P.  1*.  Kathkev.  May  1,  1894, 
he  opened  a  shop  of  his  own  on  ^lain  street,  where  he 
does  a  <»eneral  repairinj;'  business  and  manufactures 
pack  saddles.  II(^  owns,  in  c(;mi)any  with  his  brother 
Joseph,  the  old  honu^stead  of  thirty-eight  acres.  For 
five  years  he  was  county  district  pouudkeeper.  He  was 
married  in  Manti  ^Nlay  30,  1888,  to  Johannah  J.,  dauiihter 
of  ^A'illiam  B.  and  Johannah  (llouinaard)  l\ichey.  Their 
chihlren  are  Margaret  Ann,  William  J.,  Jay,  Lola  and 
Joseph  ^y. 

IIAXSEX,  1*.  ().,  deceased,  was  born  in  (Aipenhagen, 
M  Denmark,  June  11,  1818.  He  grew  up  there  and 
'  was  educated  in  the  public  schools,  and  in  1847 

came  to  Utah  in  Capt.  KimbalPs  company.  In  1850  he 
was  sent  to  Denmark,  as  the  first  Monnon  missionary, 
Erastus  Snow  soon  following.  He  labored  there  six 
years,  and  translated  the  Book  of  Mormon  into  the  Dan- 
ish language.  He  made  many  couYerts,  and  was  instru- 
Tiiental  in  bringing  many  tO'  Utah,  being  the  president  of 
three  large  companies  of  emigrants,  the  first  containing 
900  persons.  He  spent  11  years,  in  three  missions,  in 
laboring  for  the  church.  In  1858  he  came  to  Sanpete 
and  resided  in  ^fanti,  Fairview,  Mt.  Pleasant  and  Eich- 
field,  and  died  at  Manti,  August  9,  1895. 

IlAXSEX,  SOREX  CHRISTOFFERSOX,  deceased, 
jl  was  one  of  the  representative  citizens  of  Manti.  He 
'  was  born  in  Denmark,  March  5,  1819.     In  1856  he 

came  to  Utah  and  located  at  Brigham  City.  In  1858  he 
came  to  Ephraim,  this  county,  but  w^as  called  on  a  mis- 
sion to  his  native  land,  and  labored  there  for  the  good  of 
his  church  from  April,  1860,  till  October,  1862.  He  then 
located  in  Manti,  and  in  1863  bought  a  grist  mill,  which 
he  ran  many  years.  In  1864  he  built  a  carding  mill,  which 
is  still  running.  During  the  Black  Hawk  war  he  took 
his  pai-t  with  the  citizens  and  lost  a  large  number  of  cat- 
tle.    He  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  in  X^'ovember,  1866, 


128  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Anne  B.,  daughter  of  Christian  P.  and  Maria  S.  (Waas) 
Steck,  born  in  Denmark,  January  8,  1840.  Their  children 
are  Hans  S.,  Christina,  wife  of  J.  M.  iSjodahl  of  the  edito- 
rial staff  of  the  Evening  Xeivs,  Salt  Lake,  Serena,  wife  of 
J.  L.  Miller,  Enoch,  Nettie,  William.  Mrs.  Hansen  has 
t\Ao  children  bv  a  former  marriage,  Xels  Jensen  and 
Maria,  wife  of  H.  W.  liamlose.  Mr.  Hansen  Avas  a  promi- 
nent man,  and  one  of  the  heaviest  taxpayers  in  the  coun- 
ty. He  was  counsellor  to  Bishop  Jensen  seventeen  years, 
and  three  times  went  on  a  mission  to  Denmark.  He  died 
in  .AFanti  D<^cember  29,  181H. 

11  AHDY,  EKXEST  V.,  merchant,  Justice  of  the  Peace 
jl  and  manager  Deseret  Telegraph  Company  at 
'  Manti;  son  of  Augustus  P.  and  Elizabeth  Capener, 
was  born  in  Virgin  (lity,  Utah,  December  4,  18(52.  His 
father  was  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Washington  County, 
an  Indian  missionary,  and  is  a  prominent  business  man. 
His  grandparents  are  living  .in  Washington  County; 
grandfather  94  years  and  grandmother  92  years  of  age. 
At  the  age  of  12  he  entered  the  employ  of  Woolley,  Lund 
&  Judd  and  worked  for  them  twenty  years,  also  learned 
1elegraph3\  Was  one  of  the  incorporators  of  the  Laver- 
kin  Fruff  and  Nurseiy  Company  and  the  Bio  Virgin 
("anal  Company.  He  is  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W., 
being  financier  of  the  lodge  for  three  years;  was  ap- 
pointed Justice  of  the  Peace  in  June,  1897,  and  is  oper- 
ator for  the  Deseret  Telegraph  Company.  He  has  a  fine 
stock  of  dry  goods  and  gents'  furnishings,  and  is  a  suc- 
cessful business  man. 

His  wife  was  Louisa  C,  daughter  of  Moses  F.  and 
Elizabeth  J.  Farnsworth,  born  June  8,  1865.  They  were 
married  in  St.  George  September  25,  1884.  She  died 
in  Manti  September  19,  189G,  leaving  three  children: — ■ 
Louisa,  born  May  10,  1886;  Ernest  V.,  September  5,  1888, 
and  Frank  A.,  April  21,  1891.  July  24,  1897,  he  mar- 
ried Alice  Tennant  Cox. 

IJ  ENNINGSEN,  BASMUS,  harnessmaker,  son  of  Hen- 
jl  ning  and  Karen,  was  born  in  Denmark,  October 
9  29,  1822.  At  the  age  of  15  lie  learned  the  trade  of 
a  harnessmaker,  which  lie  has  followed  since,  with  the 


II 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  129 

exception  of  six  years,  during  the  war  between  Germany 
and  Denmark.  He  served  in  the  artilleiy  and  was  in 
eleven  heavj'  engagements.  Joined  the  Mormon  Church, 
June  3,  1860,  and  for  twelve  years  was  president  of  a 
branch,  baptizing  22  converts  himself.  In  1875  he  came 
to  Manti,  working  at  his  trade  11  years  with  Lars  C. 
Kjar.  In  March,  1896,  he  opened  his  present  shop, 
A'.liere  he  manufactures  harness  and  does  general  repair- 
ing, employing  one  man.  Has  been  a  ward  teacher  ever 
since  coming  to  Manti,  and  is  a  member  of  the  High 
Priests'  (]uorum.  Was  married  in  Denmark,  June  22, 
1S51,  to  Katrina  Hansen.  They  have  had  six  children: 
Paulina,  Christian  and  Maria,  living;  Katrina,  Christian 
and  Richard,  deceased.  Second  wife  was  Petrea  Peter- 
S(m,  married  in  St.  George  temple,  IMay  11,  1877.  She 
has  had  seven  children:  Karen,  Eliza,  Erastus,  Joseph, 
Martha  and  Petrea,  living;  Peter,  deceased. 


11  EXIHE,  DANIEL,  retired  farmer,  of  Manti,  Avas  bom 
jl  on  the  15th  of  November,  1825,  in  Hamilton  County, 
'  Ohio,  son  of  William  and  Myra  (Mayall)  Henric. 
His  father  had  a.  sawmill  and  grist  mill  there  He  was  a 
native  of  Virginia,  and  with  his  wife  joined  the  Mormon 
churcli  about  1811.  In  1812  the  family  moved  to  Nauvoo, 
Illinois,  wliere  Daniel,  through  hearing  Joseph  Smith 
preach,  joined  the  church  in  1813,  and  was  baptized  in 
the  Mississippi  river.  July  16,  1816,  he  enlisted  in  the 
Mormon  Battalion,  Company  D,  Nelson  Higgins,  captain. 
He  did  faithful  service  for  his  country  in  that  memora- 
ble ]\rexican  war  and  Avas  discharged  in  California  July 
16,  1817,  when  all  the  battalion  were  mustered  out  of 
service  at  Los  Angeles.  Mr.  Henrie  made  his  way  to 
Utah  in  1819,  where  the  family  had  already  emigrated, 
his  father  being  a  pioneer  in  the  fifth  ten,  though  the 
family  did  not  come  until  the  next  year  (1818)  and  set- 
tled just  north  of  Salt  Lake  City.  The  family  then  were 
four  sons  and  one  daughter;  all  are  now  living.  The 
father  followed  the  business  of  millwright  and  sawyer 
many  years  and  died,  aged  85,  in  Bountiful.  The  mother 
died  in  her  90th  year. 


180  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Daniel  was  maiTied  iu  Salt  Lake  City  bv  Bnj;liani 
Yonn;^  October  29,  1840,  to  Amanda  Hradley,  danjiliter 
of  Thomas  J.  and  Betsey  (Kroll)  Bradley.  In  March, 
1850,  they  came  to  Manti  on  a  visit  and  were  can^ht  iu 
a,  snowstorm  and  the  last  thirty-tive  miles  Mr.  Henrie 
and  Mrs.  Henrie's  brother  Jerome  hauled  her  on  a  hand 
sled.  lie  served  in  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk  wars; 
was  commissioned  by  (Jovermtr  Durkee  captain  of  Com- 
pany A,  Infantry  I^irst  Battalion,  Secouil  Regiment  Nau- 
voo  Legion.  Was  Sheriff  of  the  county  one  year.  City 
Treasurer  thi^e  years,  senior  president  of  the  Forty- 
♦■ighth  (juorum  of  Seventies  for  about  thirty-tive  years. 

By  this  wife  he  had  fourteen  child ri^u,  all  boin  in 
Manti  except  the  tirst,  viz. :  ^lary  A.,  ^lyra  E.,  Susan  L., 
I)ani(d,  Diantha,  James,  Jerome  B.,  William,  Melinda 
E.,  Marjiaret  p].,  Luna  A.,  Thomas  J.,  Jedidiah  and 
Loren,  tlie  hist  three  are  deceased,  lie  also  married  a 
secoiul  wife,  Snsan,  daiijihter  of  Ellis  and  Elizabeth 
Coleman,  by  whom  he  had  twelve  children,  all  born  in 
Manti,  (\f  which  Jose]»h  T.,  Baclicl,  Artlmr,  Samuel,  Cora 
and  Ellis  are  liviuj;-. 

rn(d(^  Daniel,  as  lu^  is  familiaily  calh^l,  endured  ail 
the  i)rivations  and  trials  incident  to  ijioneer  life,  but  he 
still  survives,  a.  stalwait  for  tnith  and  honesty,  immova- 
ble in  his  honest  convictions  and  a  man  always  to  be  re- 
lied u])on. 

llEXKlE,  JEROME  B.,  farmer,  son  of  Daniel  and 
ri  Amanda,  was .  born  in  Manti  November  25,  1800. 
/  He  was  broniilit  up  on  a  farm  and  oavus  sixty-live 
acres.  Was  for  many  years  en^aiicd  in  freightinj^-  farm 
])roduce  to  the  niinin<i  camps  of  I'tali  and  Xevada.  About 
1888,  in  company  with  Hans  Larsen,  he  built  a  sawmill 
in  Six-]Mile-  canyon,  where  he  was  engaged  in  getting  out 
timber  from  the  mountains  till  1890.  Was  maiTied  in 
Manti  :March  27,  1889,  to  :Mary  C,  daughter  of  Peter  and 
Anne  Madsen  Westenskow,  born  in  Manti,  November  3, 
1808.  She  had  three  children:  Jerome,  Calvin  H.  and 
Harold,  all  deceased.  ^Mfe  died  February  10,  1892.  He 
was  man-ied  again  ^Nfarch  7,  1893,  to  Thea,  daughter  of 
Thomas  S.  and  Martha  Lund,  born  in  Salem,  Utah,  April 


JEZREEL.    SHOMAKER, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  131 

13,  1870.  Tliev  have  two  ebildreu:  Alpliouso  aud 
Irven  L. 

II  OGG  AN,  JAMES  AV.,  merchant,  was  boru  in  Diin- 
M  fermline,  Fifeshire,  Soothmd,  Febrnary  25,  1854. 
'  The  family  came  to  Salt  Lake  City  in  1863,  whei'e 
his  father  engaged  in  stone  qnariying-  and  was  killed 
in  the  quarries  near  Fort  Douglas  June  29,  1871.  His 
mother  died  in  Salt  Lake  City  February  3,  1895.  At  the 
age  of  17  he  took  his  father's  business  and  filled  con- 
tracts for  stone,  then  engaged  as  teamster  for  five  years. 
In  1877  he  came  to  Manti  aud  engaged  in  lumbering, 
afterwards  as  a  contractor  in  building  Utah  Southern 
and  Eio  Grande  Western  railroad.  About  1885  he 
purchased  the  Manti  steam  sawmill,  Avhich  he  run  for 
live  years,  when  a  fire  consumed  all  he  had,  about  |10,- 
000.  Inside  of  two  days  he  had  secured  an  extensive 
contract  on  the  Eio  Grande  Western  railroad  and  set 
men  and  teams  to  work.  He  aud  his  brother  William 
established  the  present  business  in  1892,  he  purchased 
his  brother's  interest  in  January,  1895,  and  has  a  suc- 
cessful trade  in  general  merchandise.  He  is  also  en- 
gaged in  wool-growing,  having  about  5000  sheep.  Is 
a  stockholder  in  the  Manti  City  Savings  Bank  and  Cen- 
tral LTtah  Wool  Company,  assisting  in  the  organization 
of  both.  Is  a  member  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  Mr.  Hoggan 
is  an  energetic,  enterprising  business  man  and  ranks 
high  among  the  merchants  of  the  county.  His  Avife  was 
Sarah,  daughter  of  John  and  Ann  Davis  Eosser.  They 
A\'ere  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  January  11,  1883,  and 
have  six  children: — Walter  J.,  Louise  S.,  Eosser  J.,  Isa- 
bel le,  Nellie  J.  and  William  M. 

11  OGGAX,  THOMAS  A.,  of  :\[auti,  is  a  dealer  in  geu- 
jl  eral  merchandise.  ^Ir.  Hoggan  is  a  native  of  Iowa 
'  and  came  to  ^lanti  in  1879.  After  his  arrival  here 

he  worked  at  his  trade  of  carpenter,  also  was  engaged  in 
wool-growing.  In  1895  he  began  in  the  mercantile  busi- 
ness and  by  strict  attention  to  business  has  made  a  suc- 
cess of  it.  He  carries  one  Of  the  best  selected  stocks  of 
goods  found  in  ^Nlanti,  consisting  of  dry  goods,  groceries, 
shoes,  crockery,  tiuAvare,  etc. 


182  HISTORY    01    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

M  OLAI,  CHEISTIAN  PETEKSEN,  farmer,  was  bom  in 
jl  Deimiaik  Mav  27,  1840.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm, 
*  joined  the  Mormon  Church  in  18G2  and  in  1864 
came  to  Utah,  diivinsi-  an  ox  team  loaded  with  merchan- 
dise to  Salt  Lake  City.  Kesided  in  Ephraim  one  year,  and 
in  18(j5  came  to  ^Manti,  where  he  worked  at  anytliing  he 
could  get  to  do  until  he  was  able  to  buy  a  fann.  He  now 
owns  lifty  acres.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  do- 
ing his  share  in  guarding  and  chasing  the  Indians.  For 
many  years  he  has  been  president  of  the  Elders'  quorum 
and  is  an  enthusiastic  worker  in  the  church.  He  was 
married  in  jManti  to  I>(M'tha  M.  Christiansen,  who  died, 
leaying  one  child,  Christian  P.  Again  married  to  Helena 
M.  Xeilsen.  They  haye  six  children:  Helena  M.,  Neils 
C,  Caroline  jSF.,  Mary  C,  Charles  A.  and  Heniw  M. 

llifSIOKI),  EDWIN  TII():N1AS,  :M.  1).,  son  of  John  S. 
ji  and  Jane  S.,  \yas  born  in  London,  England,  Janu- 
'  ary  10,  1868.  He  studied  in  the  Woodgrange  Col- 
lege, and  at  the  age  of  18  years  held  three  diplomas  from 
the  College  of  Precei)tors,  and  one  from  the  Society  <d" 
Apotli(M-ari<^s,  Loiuhtn.  He  registered  as  medical  student 
in  London.  During  the  summer  yacations  he  continued 
liis  studit^  in  the  office  of  Dr.  John  Reeks. 

In  tlie  fall  of  1887,  he,  with  his  brother,  Dr.  William 
J.  Hosford,  ])ur(hased  the  practice  of  Dr.  St.  John  of 
Manti,  and  in  comj-any  with  their  mother,  they  left  Lon- 
don for  Ctah,  where  they  haye  since  resided.  ■  In  1892-93 
he  took  a  course  at  the  Keokuk  Medical  College,  Iowa, 
giying  especial  study  to  the  diseases  of  women  and  chil- 
dren, and  receiyed  tlie  degree  of  ]M.  D.  from  there  on 
March  7,  181)3.  He  is  a  fraternal  man,  being  a  Past 
Grand  of  Temple  City  Lodge  No.  23,  I.  O.  O.  F.;  also 
treasurer  of  Unity  Forum  No.  1319,  H.  F.  B.  O.  He  it 
also  a  member  of  tlie  A.  O.  F.  He  is  surgeon  to  the  S.  P. 
V.  Eailway,  and  also  medical,  examiner  for  all  the  lead- 
ing life  insurance  companies.  He  was  married  on  Janu- 
ary 30,  1889,  to  Ethella  C,  daughter  of  Hon.  Luther  T. 
and  Lola  A.  Tuttle,  who  was  born  in  jNIanti,  May  10,  1870. 
They  haye  four  children,  Albert  E.,  Jennie  L.,  Winnifred 
C.  and  Leo  W. 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  183 

II  OSFORD,  WILLIAM  JOSEPH,  M.  1).,  son  of  John 
Jl  S.  and  Jane  S.,  was  born  in  London,  England, 
/  September  G,  1865.  From  his  youth  up  he  was 
engaged  in  preparing  for  the  medical  profession.  Com- 
mencing his  literary  studies  at  the  early  age  of  seven 
years,  at  the  age  of  15  he  passed  his  examination  in  Arts 
at  the  Society  of  Apothecaries,  London,  Eng.,  being  the 
youngest  person  to  do  so.  He  entered  on  his  medical 
studies  at  the  London  Hospital,  Whitechapel  Road,  Lon- 
don, Eng.,  and  receiving  his  certificate  fix)m  there,  also 
taking  his  examination  at  the  Apothecaries  Hall  in 
1887  and  receiving  a  license  from  there.  He  served  as 
a  volunteer  assistant  surgeon  during  the  war  and  cam- 
paign in  Egypt.  He  also  took  charge  of  his  uncle's  prac- 
tice at  Stratford,  Essex,  while  studying  at  the  hospital. 
In  the  fall  of  1887  he,  with  his  brother,  Dr.  E.  T.  Hos- 
f<.  rd,  purchased  the  practice  of  Dr.  St.  John  of  Manti 
and  left  London  for  Utah,  their  mother  accompanying 
them,  August  1,  1887.     They  have  since  resided     here. 

III  the  years  of  1889-90  he  again  took  a  course  at  the 
University  of  Colorado,  studying  diseases  of  the  eye,  ear, 
uose  and  throat  as  a  specialty,  receiving  the  degree  of 
M.  D.  from  that  institution  in  May,  1890.  Dr.  Hosford 
is  an  enthusiastic  member  of  fraternal  societies,  being 
a  member  of  the  F.  A.  M.,  I.  O.  O.  F.  in  all  its  branches, 
being  Past  Grand  and  District  Deputy  Grand  Master 
and  Past  Chief  Patriarch,  and  in  conjunction  with  two 
other  members,  being  the  pioneer  of  Odd  Fellowship  in 
Southern  T'Ttah.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  F. 
and  H.  F.  B.  O.  He  is  Medical  Examiner  for  all  the 
leading  life  insurance  companies  and  surgeon  for  the 
Rio  Grande  Western  and  Sanpete  Valley  railroads.  Was 
also  Quarantine  Phvsician  for  Manti  Citv.  He  married 
or.  July  28,  1890,  Lillie  B.,  danghter  of  Hon.  L.  T.  and 
Lcla  A.  Tuttle,  born  in  Manti,  October  3rd,  1867.  They 
have  four  children,  Kathleen  L.,  Frederic  W^.,  Eileen  A. 
and  Erma  B. 

IIOFGAARD,  HON.  JOHN  H.,  Surveyor  of  Sanpete 
(1  County,  is  the  son  of  Rasmus  H.  and  Magdalene 
'  Hougaard,  and  was  born  on  the  island  of  Falster, 
Denmark,  November  10,  1842.     His  boyhood  days  were 


134  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

spent  on  a  farm.  The  family  were  converted  to  the  Mor- 
mon faith  in  their  native  land,  and  emigrated  to  Utah 
in  the  fall  of  18()2,  settling  in  Manti.  The  family  con- 
sisted of  thi*ee  sons  and  three  danghters.  The  father  was 
a  very  zealous  member  of  the  church  and  spent  most  of 
his  comfortable  fortune  in  the  cause.  He  brought  sixty- 
five  persons  from  Denmark  to  Utah  besides  his  own  fam- 
ily, at  his  private  expense.  The  parents  both  died  in 
Manti,  the  father,  February  27,  1875,  and  the  mother, 
I'ebruaiT  19,  1881.  Our  subject  studied  the  English  lan- 
guage before  coming  to  this  country,  and  after  his  ar^ 
rival  here  stu(li<Ml  in  the  Union  Academy  of  Salt  Lake, 
afterward  un^igcd  into  the  Desei'et  University.  He  also 
stu<lied  surveying,  photography  and  telegraphy.  He  was 
the  tirst  telegra])h  operat(>r  in  ]Manti,  which  occupation 
he  followed  two  years,  when  he  returned  to  his  native 
1,1  nd  on  a  mission  leaving  luM'e  in  the  s])riug  of  1800,  and 
\\.oi'king  for  the  good  of  tlu'  church  until  the  fall  of  1870. 
Upon  his  return  he  followed  the  business  of  a  traveling 
l>hotographer  two  years  in  southern  Utah.  He  then 
entered  the  office  of  county  surveyor  as  deputy  and 
serv(^(l  three  yeai-s  when  he  received  another  call  and 
■went  to  southern  Colorado  as  surveyor  for  the  church. 
He  located  and  platted  the  tAvo  towns  of  Ephraim  and 
Manassa,  beside  «loing  considerable  sm'veying  on  canals 
and  ditches  in  inigate  the  new  settlement.  On  his  re- 
turn to  Manti  he  was  in  1880  elected  to  the  olffice  of 
county  surveyor  which  he  has  since  filled,  excepting  two 
years.  He  is  assisted  by  his  son,  Jolm  A.,  who  is  also 
deputy  county  recorder  and  deputy  postmaster.  Mr. 
Hougaard  is  manager  and  a  large  stockh(dder  in  the 
Manti  Union  flouring  mills,  and  is  also  a  stockholder  in 
the  Co-op  store,  and  the  Manti  City  Savings  Bank.  He 
was  interested  in  the  first  grist  mill  built  in  ^Mayfield. 
He  is  also  inter-ested  in  wool-growing,  having  a  band  of 
about  1000  head  of  sheep.  He  is  a  charter  member  and 
was  the  first  past  master  of  Manti  Lodge  No.  23,  A.  O.  T". 
W.  He  Avas  mayor  of  Manti  four  years,  and  member  of 
the  City  Council  six  years.  ]Mr.  Hougaard  is  an  enter- 
prising, energetic  citizen  of  the  kind  which  ludp  to  build 
up  a  toAvn,  and  is  highly  esteemed  by  his  fellow  towns- 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  135 

men,  Avho  look. upon  him  as  a  leader  in  enterprises  of  mer- 
it, lie  married  in  .^[anti,  .Mav  11,  ISOO,  to  Petrea,  dani^li- 
ter  of  Andrew  (\  and  Dortliea  Petersen,  born  in  Jylland, 
Denmark,  May  30,  1852.  Their  children  are  as  follows: 
John  H.,  Jr.,  born  December  15,  1871,  died  January  3, 
1872;  Magdalene  Doi'thea,  born  April  28,  1873,  died  No- 
vember 7,  1879;  Rosetta  Petrea,  born  July  22,  1875,  died 
Februaiy  18,  1891;  John  A.,  born  July  21,  1877;  Magnola, 
born  July  7,  1880;  Blanche,  born  Janimiy  18,  1883;  Clara 
Bell,  born  March  12,  1885;  Ralph,  born  Februaiy  18, 
1887;  Anthon,  born  October  4,  1889;  Vera,  born  Noy em- 
ber 4,  1894. 


JEN8EX,  FKEDEKK^K,  farmer,  of  Manti,  son  of  Louis 
and  Chi-istina  (Poth),  was  born  in  Copenhagen, 
Denmai-k,  ]May  27,  1800.  Parents  joined  the  Mor- 
juon  church  and  in  18()()  stai-ted  for  Zion,  but  the  father 
died  on  the  plains;  mother  is  now  liying  in  jNIanti.  Fred 
was  raised  a  farmer  and  has  followed  it  all  his  life.  I'or 
several  years  he  freighted  produce  to  the  mining  camps 
of  Nevada,  and  in  the  fall  for  many  years  he  has  run  a. 
threshing  machine.  He  also  tried  woolgrowing  a  couple 
of  years,  but  farming  is  his  successful  business.  He  has 
a  nice  fann  of  eighty  acies  north  of  town  and  a  c(nnforta- 
ble  residence  in  town.  Mr.  Jensen  is  a  worthy  citizen 
and  well  liked  by  the  people.  In  1895  they  elected  him 
to  represent  them  in  the  City  Council  and  he  was  re- 
elected in  1897.  He  was  married  January  ({,  1881,  to 
Christina  ]M.,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Maria  Lund,  born  in 
Denmark  ^lay  11,  18(>1.  They  have  seven  children,  as 
follows:  Frederick  P.,  ]\faranda,  Katie,  Henry,  Glen, 
MeiTill  and  Earle. 


JENSEN,  BISHOP  HANS,  of  :Manti,  son  of  Peter  and 
Margaretta  (Peterson),  was  born  in  Hals,  Aalsborg, 
Denmark,  June  24,  1829.  In  November,  1853,  the 
Ijarents,  with  their  two  boys,  Hans  and  Lauritz,  started 
for  the  home  of  the  Saints  in  Utah.  When  they  reached 
Hull,  England,  the  father   died.     In  crossing    the  ocean 


136  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Hans  mariied  Mary  Ericksen.  In  March  they  reached 
New  Orleans,  and  continued  their  journey  up  the  river, 
and  finally  cami^ed  near  Kansas  City,  where  the  mother 
died.  Here  Lauritz,  then  10  years  old,  joined  a  camp  of 
freighters  hauling  goods  to  Fort  Defiance,  N.  M.,  and 
Hans  heard  nothing  of  him  for  seventeen  years.  He  is 
now  an  ex-Judge  in  Manassa,  Colo.  October  4,  1854,  Hans 
arrived  in  Salt  Lake  and  reached  Manti  the  same  year, 
where  he  has  since  been  engaged  in  farming  and  wool- 
growing.  About  twenty  years  he  was  also  engaged  in 
selling  faiin  implements  and  is  a  director  in  the  Manti 
Co-op.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  ('ity  Council  several 
years.  Seven  years  he  was  bishop's  counsellor,  and  the 
last  twenty  years  he  has  been  bishop)  of  the  South  ward 
of  Manti.  In  1865  he  went  on  a  mission  to  Denmark 
and  was  gone  three  and  one-half  years.  In  1878  he  was 
sent  by  the  church  to  lielp  locate  ^Nlauassa  and  Sauford 
in  Colorado.  He  took  his  two  cliildren,  Mary  and  Mari- 
nus.  In  i-eturning  he  had  to  ]>ass  througli  a  hostile  Indian 
country',  and  as  the  Ouray  war  was  then  in  progress,  he 
had  several  narrow  escapes,  but  through  coolness  and 
courage  he  esca])e(l  injury.  Second  wife,  Maria  Ras- 
mussen,  has  six  children.  Christian  K.,  Elvina,  Ma<iT  A., 
Louis,  Erastus  and  Catherine,  deceased.  Third  wife, 
^laria  C.  Jorgensen,  has  eleven  (•hi1(lr<MK  Mary  L.,  Haus 
P.,  ^larinus,  deceased,  Stency,  Sophrouia,  Margaret,  Hil- 
da, Tvinda,  Cai'oliuc,  Cicrtrinh-  and  May,  deceased.  The 
bishop  is  a  prominent  citizen  and  avcII  liked  by  his  people. 

JENSEN,  OLE,  woolgrower,  son  of  Canute  and  Bodel, 
was  born  in  Denmark,  September  18,  1849,  and 
came  to  Utah  with  his  parents,  in  1862,  stopping 
at  Provo,  and  finally  locating  in  Gunnison.  He  took 
part  in  the  Indian  wars  and  at  the  age  of  18  removed 
to  Scipio,  where  his  parents  died  in  1874.  In  1879  he 
was  called  as  a  missionary  to  Apache  county,  Arizona, 
where  he  assisted  in  building  the  town  of  St.  John.  He 
was  one  of  the  stockholders  of  the  Co-op  store  in  that 
town  and  a  clerk  for  three  or  four  years,  then  engaged 
in  the  furniture  business,  which  he  sold  in  1887  and  re- 
moved to  this  citv.     He  labored  for  four  vears  in  the 


I 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  137 

temple  and  spent  a  two  years''mission  to  Denmark,  His 
handsome  residence  is  a  credit  to  tlie  city.  He  owns 
abont  2500  sheep.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Scipio, 
May  16,  1870,  was  Magdalene,  danghter  of  Asmus  and 
Elizabeth  Lamp,  born  in  Denmark,  Augnst  6,  1847. 
They  have  three  children:  Henry  O.,  bom  March  4,  1871, 
married  Annie  Peterson;  they  have  one  child,  Leslie  O. 
Helena,  born  March  28,  1873,  wife  of  Ernest  Madsen. 
I.ydia  R.,  born  Jnne  3,  1875,  teacher  in  Manti  schools. 

JOHNSON,  AL^MA,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Robert  and  Elizabeth  Johnson,  was  born  in  Manti 
December  2,  1858,  and  brought  up  a  fanner.  He 
owns  about  sixty  acres  of  laud  near  here  besides  a  good 
home  in  the  city.  Born  and  reared  a  Latter-day  Saint, 
he  has  fulfilled  a  mission  of  over  two  years  in  England, 
and  is  one  of  the  ward  teachers  and  member  of  the  Tab- 
ernacle choir.  He  was  engaged  several  years  in  freight- 
ing produce  to  the  mining  towns  of  Utah  and  Nevada, 
and  in  November,  1897,  A^'as  elected  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  on  the  Democratic  ticket.  On  November  25,  1886, 
he  was  mai'ried  in  the  Logan  Temple  to  Margaret  E., 
daughter  of  Dauiel  and  Amau<la  Henrie.  She  was  born 
in  ]Manti  December  23,  1861.  Their  family  consists  of 
three  living  children:  Alice,  Kate  D.  and  Alma  H., 
Elizabeth  being  dead. 

JOHNSON,  ROBERT,  of  Manti,  sou  of  AViliam  and  Ann 
(EdAvards),  born  near  Chester,  England,  September 
4,  1823.  As  the  family  was  large  and  poor,  Robert 
at  an  early  age  was  put  to  work  in  a  cotton  factory,  and 
became  quite  an  expert  in  cotton  mill  machinery.  He 
married  and  settled  down,  but  joined  the  Mormon  church 
and  concluded  to  come  to  the  land  of  the  Saints,  so  in 
1853,  with  his  wife  and  two  childien,  they  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake, 
October  16,  1853.  In  January,  1854,  they  came  to  Manti, 
where  Mr.  Johnson  engaged  in  making  adobes  and  other 
occupations  till  he  secured  a  farm.  He  folloAved  farm- 
ing for  many  years,  but  a  few  years  ago  he  divided  most 
of  his  laud  among  his  sons  and  retired.  During  the  Black 


138  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Hawk  war  be  was  a  member  of  the  Home  Guard  two 
years.  In  May,  1883,  lie  weut  on  a  mission  to  England 
and  labored  for  the  cause  tAvo  jears.  Mr.  Johnson  is  a 
man  of  sterling  qualities,  honorable  and  upright  in  his 
dealings,  and  a  good  neighbor.  He  married  January  12, 
1845,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Elizabeth 
(Clark)  Johnson,  born  in  Yorkshire^,  England,  October  2, 
1825.  Their  children  are  Kobert,  Mary  E.,  Elizabeth  A., 
Alma,  Martha  and  Xephi. 

JCJLLEY,  MKS.  CHELXEOHA,  proprietor  of  tlie 
Jolley  IIousp,  wi(h)W  of  Francis  M.,  daughter  of 
Madison  I>.  and  Clielnecha  Smith  Hamilton;  was 
born  in  Salt  Lake  City  March  24,  1848.  Her  father  came 
to  Utah  in  1847,  being  one  of  the  most  prominent  pio- 
neers of  San])ete  county,  lie  setlled  in  ^lanti  in  1840 
and  late]*  in  Mt.  IMcasant,  where  his  home  and  sawmill 
were  burned  by  Indians.  Several  residences  of  this  city 
were  built  by  him,  among  them  tlie  piesent  Snow  Hotel. 
He  carried  the  mail  1o  Salt  Lake  (ity,  and  was  engaged 
in  business  in  X('i)hi  and  Moroni  an<l  o])erating  a  Houriug 
mill  in  this  city,  where  Ik^  died  in  18()9.  His  wife  died 
here  also  March  U,  1871).  Clielnecha  was  maiTied  to 
Francis  M.  Jolley  in  Moroni  Sejiteniber  3,  18(55.  He  was 
engaged  in  the  sliee|»  liusiiu^ss,  as  a  miller  and  carpentei*, 
and  died  here  NovcMuber  13,  1891.  They  had  seven  chil- 
dren: Francis  ]\I.,  l)eli)hia  E.,  wife  of  (^uincy  Crawford, 
and  Effie  living;  Clielnecha,  Ada  L.,  Manning  1>.  and 
Madison  1).,  deceased. 


J 


ONES,  ]\fOSP^S  M.,  (»f  ^Nlanti,  is  an  expert  Avorknian 
in  constructing  and  running  carding  mills.  He 
Avas  born  in  Montgomeiwshire,  North  Wales, 
June  4,  1826.  He  learned  his  trade  of  wool-carder  in  his 
native  country,  where  he  also  joined  the  Mormon  church 
in  1802  and  emigrated  to  Salt  Lake  in  1869,  where  he 
was  employed  over  two  years  by  Brigham  Young  at  $4 
per  shift  to  work  in  the  Deseret  AYoolen  Mills.  From 
there  he  went  to  Provo  Avith  John  Hardin  and  they  put 
in  eleven  looms  for  the  Provo  Woolen  ]Mills.  In  1875  he 
came  to  Manti  and  for  tAventy-one  years  Avas  employed  in 


J.    W.    HOGGAN, 
MANTI. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  139 

Christofferson's  mill.  In  June,  1897,  he  took  the  Peacock 
mill  and  is  engaged  in  rolling  wool  for  spinning.  He  was 
man'ied  in  Provo  in  1ST2  to  Christina  Feriy,  by  whom 
he  has  three  children,  Abrani,  Quendollan  and  Sophia, 
all  of  Avhoni  are  grown  up  and  living  in  Manti. 

JOKGEX8EX,  NIELS,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Easmus  and  Sophia  Peterson,  was  born  in  Den- 
mark, November  1,  1854.  His  parents  joined  the 
Mormon  church  and  came  to  this  city  in  18G1,  crossing 
the  plains  in  an  oxtrain.  Father  died  in  Manti  March 
4,  1895,  mother  August  3,  1885.  He  was  reared  a.  farmer 
and  owns  60  aci'es  besides  his  home  in  this  city.  In  1882 
he  helped  erect  the  first  steam  sawmill  in  Manti  canyon, 
owning  a  fifth  interest,  and  in  later  years  has  owned  a 
similar  share  in  a  threshing  machine.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council  for  three  years.  His  wife  was 
Dorthea,  daughter  of  Jens  and  Charlotte  Hansen,  bom 
in  Manti,  March  20,  1856.  Her  parents  were  among  the 
first  Danish  families  in  the  city,  coming  here  in  1853, 
her  father  being  a  leader  among  his  people.  They  were 
married  in  Manti,  February  13,  1879,  and  have  had  ten 
children:  James,  Louise,  Ernest,  Fredei-ick,  Helen,  Es- 
ther, Eunice,  Stanley  and  Rnsalia,  living;  Isabel,  dead. 

JUDD,  JOSEPH,  Sheriff,  son  of  Samuel  and  Catherine 
Haynes,  was  born  in  Birmingham,  England,  Feb- 
ruaiy  2,  1849.  He  came  to  LTtah  with  his  mother 
and  family,  four  sons  and  four  daughters,  in  1864,  the 
father  coming  in  1862.  Two  girls  and  one  boy  died  on 
the  way,  the  others  crossing  the  plains  in  TS^arren's  and 
Kimball's  and  Lawrence's  ox  trains.  He  and  his  brother 
Thomas  drove  ox  teams,  walking  all  the  way.  They  lo- 
cated in  St.  George,  Joseph  learning  the  carpenter  and 
stair-builder's  trade  and  becoming  a  prominent  me- 
chanic. He  was  one  of  the  foremen  in  building  the  St. 
George  Temple  and  a  contractor  and  merchant  at  Silver 
Eeef,  where  he  made  the  coffin  for  "Dutch  Jake,"  the 
first  man  who  died  there.  Was  Deputy  Sheriff  of  Wash- 
ington county  for  several  years  and  active  in  suppressing 
the  Silver  Reef  strike  in  1881.    In  1884  he  came  to  Manti 

5 


140  HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

and  assisted  in  constructing  tide  magnificent  spiral  stairs 
in  the  temple. 

He  was  foieman  in  erecting  the  Garfield  Beach  re- 
sort and  the  architect's  superintendent  in  constructing 
the  famous  Saltair  Beach,  and  foreman  in  building  sev- 
eral prominent  houses  of  Salt  Lake  City.  He  worked  at 
his  trade  in  this  citv  and  served  as  Justice  of  the  Peace. 
In  1804  he  was  appointed  Probate  Judge  by  President 
i^leveland  and  held  the  office  till  it  was  abolished  in 
189H.  He  was  elected  Sheriff  in  November,  1896,  and  is 
an  able  and  efficient  officer.  In  company  with  Alexander 
Tennant  and  Nephi  Ottoscn  he  has  managed  the  Manti 
Lumber  (\>ni])any,  tlip  mill  being  now  idle  on  account  of 
government  timber  regulations.  He  is  manager  of  the 
Manti  Ci-eamery.  He  is  a  charter  member  of  the  A.  O. 
U.  W.  and  a  pavSt  master  workman.  He  was  married  in 
Manti  and  has  a  nice  family. 

KELLAB,  CONliAD  J.,  son  of  Daniel  and  Anna,  was 
bom  in  Switzerland,  August  31,  1840.  He  was 
raised  in  Switzerland  and  in  1863  removed  to 
Germany.  Came  to  LTtah  in  1878  and  located  in  Manti, 
whei'e  he  was  engaged  six  years  working  on  the  tem- 
ple. Was  maiTied  in  Germany,  October  28,  1867,  to  Mar- 
garet Kusmout,  born  May  31,  1847.  They  have  had  nine 
children:  Conrad  F.,  Anna,  Maiw,  Emily,  John  and  Al- 
bert D.,  living;  Rika,  Jacob  and  INIargaret,  deceased. 

KELLAB,  JACOB,  deceased,  son  of  Daniel  and  Anna 
Frischknecht,  was  born  in  Switzerland,  June  22, 
1837.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  weaver  and  em- 
broiderer, joined  the  Momion  Church  in  1861  and  in 
1863  started  for  T^tah,  being  maiTied  on  board  ship.  On 
reaching  the  Missouri  river  he  was  out  of  funds  and  bor- 
rowed enough  to  pay  transportation  for  baggage  across 
the  plains.  He  and  his  wife  had  to  walk  most  of  the 
way,  coming  in  Capt.  Nebeker's  Church  oxtrain.  They 
came  to  Manti  in  October,  1863,  and  hauled  their  win- 
ter's wood  on  a  handcart,  which  was  borrowed.  The 
winter  was  spent  in  a  little  log  hut,  TN-ith  cloth  for  win- 
dows and  doors,  and  in  the  spring  they  lived  in  a  cellar 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  141 

8x14  feet.  They  bought  a  lot  and  both  went  to  work 
and  dug  a  ceUar  and  covei'ed  it  with  willows  and  dirt. 
He  worked  at  what  he  could  get  in  summer  and  wove 
cloth  in  winter.  In  18G8  he  worked  on  the  railroad  and 
secured  money  to  pay  his  emigration  debt  and  buy  four 
acres  of  land,  and  added  to  that  by  thrift  and  cai'eful 
management,  till  at  his  death  he  owned  over  100  acres 
and  was  in  good  circumstances.  They  suffered  many 
hardships  during  the  gTasshopper  plague,  having  lived 
for  a  time  on  bran  bread  and  water.  For  nine  years  they 
had  no  tea,  coffee  or  sugar.  He  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  was  an  active  churchman,  a  high  priest  and 
a  highl}'  respected  citizen.  Died  October  3,  1892,  death 
being  caused  by  falling  from  a  load  of  hay.  Mrs.  Kellar 
was  called  to  work  in  the  Manti  tenifjle  in  June,  1888, 
ard  has  labored  there  ten  years.  Her  maiden  name  was 
Anna.  I\.  Dierauer  Heniman.  They  were  married  June 
11,  1863,  and  have  six  living  children,  Anna,  Mary,  Ja- 
cob, Louise,  Eliza  and  Emily  1\.  Emma  and  Daniel,  de- 
ceased. 

KENNER,  FOSTER  R.,  deceased,  son  of  Robert  H.  and 
Hannah  S.  Foster,  was  bom  in  Kentucky  December 
9,  1823.  Two  of  his  grandfathers  served  in  the  war 
of  the  Revolution,  one  as  a  naval  commander,  the  other 
under  Washington  on  land.  He  was  raised  in  Kentucky 
aad  studied  medicine  at  Louisville.  Was  married  in  that 
State  to  Sarah  K.  Kirk  wood.  They  have  four  children: 
Scipio  A.,  of  Salt  Lake  City,  an  attorney,  newspaperman 
and  member  of  the  State  Legislature;  Robert  J.,  a  mining- 
main  in  the  Klondike;  Mary  E.  and  William  H.,  a  news- 
paperman in  Idaho.  His  fii'st  wife  died  in  Kentucky  and 
he  married  Elizabeth  E.  Townsend,  who  soon  died.  He 
then  removed  to  Iowa,  being  station  agent  at  Keokuk, 
where  he  was  a  prominent  member  of  the  Masonic  fra- 
ternity, and  built  Kenner  Lodge.  In  1860  he  came  to 
Utah  and  located  in  Salt  Lake  City,  where  he  resided  till 
1867,  when  he  removed  to  Manti  with  a  stock  of  general 
merchandise  and  kept  a  store  for  two  years.  He  took 
an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  holding  the  rank 
of  Colonel.    Was  a.  contractor  in  building  the  Denver  «& 


142  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Kio  Grande  railway.  Served  as  a  director  in  the  Co-op 
store  and  a  member  of  the  City  Council  for  several  years. 
He  was  a  very  active  and  prominent  Democrat  and  was 
once  a  candidate  for  Mayor,  being  defeated  by  one  vote. 
His  third  wife,  now  living,  was  Carolina  Schneebely, 
born  in  SAvitzerland  September  8,  1838.  They  were  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City  by  President  Brigham  Young  and 
have  four  living  children.  He  died  in  Manti  May  27, 
1892.  Their  children  are:  Beauregard,  Emily  E.,  Kob- 
ert  E.  L.,  Bei'tha  and  two  deceased — Marietta  E.  and 
Elizabeth  J. 

KILLPACK,  WILLIAM  J.,  farmer  and  stockraiser, 
scm  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Day  Killpack,  born  at 
Dunton  Bassett,  Leicestershire,  England,  Febru- 
ary <►,  1S.*>2.  Followed  the  business  of  carrier  until  liis 
removal  to  America,  which  occurred  in  1853.  He  arrived 
in  Salt  Lake  Cit}-  September  30,  18')3,  crossing  the  plains 
by  ox-train  in  Jacob  Gates'  company;  remained  in  Salt 
Lake  City  till  the  southeni  move  in  1858,  when  he  re- 
moved to  Manti,  remaining  till  1863,  when  he  went  fur- 
ther south  and  helped  settle  Glenwood  on  the  Sevier.  He 
was  there  all  through  the  Indian  Avar  and  lost  all  he  had. 
When  the  settlers  were  driven  out  he  returned  to  Manti, 
where  he  has  since  resided.  He  ran  the  Spencer  saAvmill 
for  eleven  years;  after  that  he  settled  down  to  farming 
and  now  has  a  fine  ranch  of  100  acres  about  four  miles 
south  of  Manti,  also  a  nice  home  in  town.  Was  maiTied 
in  the  Salt  Lake  Endowument  House  August  6,  1854,  to 
Eliza  S.  Sauze,  daughter  of  William  and  Amy  Miller 
Sauze,  who  was  born  July  6,  1837.  They  have  twelve 
children  living,  viz.:  John  D.,  Samuel,  William,  Mary 
E.,  Frederic  A.,  John  H.,  Edward  A.,  Frank  H.,  Grace, 
Charles  R.,  Jessie  M.,  Clara  A.,  and  two  deceased:  Wil- 
liam J.  and  an  infant. 

KJAR,  JOHX  C,  of  Manti,  son  of  Lars  C.  and  Mette  M. 
fClii-istensen),  born  in  Hals  near  Aalborg,  Denmark, 
January  12,  1849.  His  parents  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  started  for  this  country  in  November,  1854. 
The  family  then  comprised  the  parents,  three  sons  and 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  143 

one  dnitu;lit<n'.  Three  times  their  vessel  started  to  cross 
the  Xorth  Sea  befoi'e  tliey  succeeded,  and  on  one  occasion 
the  ship's  crew  had  no  liope  of  reaching  land,  their  ship 
and  all  the  passengers  were  frequently  drenched.  In 
crossing  the  plains  many  of  their  company  died  from  ex- 
posure, including  two  of  the  three  sons.  John  C.  met  with 
a  serious  accident  in  trying  to  climb  into  the  wagon.  He 
fell  and  both  wheels  passed  over  him,  crushing  his  right 
arm.  No  doctor  was  near,  so  the  arm  was  bandaged  in 
molasses,  but  came  out  all  right.  They  arrived  in  Salt 
Lake  in  the  fall  of  1855,  and  one  year  later  moved  to 
3Ianti,  where  the  father  for  many  years  had  a  shoe  shop 
and  later  a  harness  shop.  He  died  February  15,  1896,  in 
ills  80th  year.  Mother  still  survives.  Our  subject  spent 
his  early  life  working  on  the  farm,  and  when  he  started 
out  for  himself  secured  a  farm,  and  has  been  very  suc- 
cessful; is  also  engaged  in  raising  cattle  and  sheep,  and 
is  a  stockholder  in  the  IManti  City  Savings  Bank  and  the 
Central  Utah  Wool  Company.  Mr.  K.  is  one  of  the  repre- 
sentative citizens  of  Manti.  He  built  a  nice  residence  in 
town,  aufl  married  January  8,  1872,  to  ^largaret^  daugh- 
ter of  Jens  C.  A.  and  Secelia  Weibve,  born  in  Denmark 
May  25,  1854. 

I  Aix'SEN,  HON.  CHKISTEN  P.,  contractor  and  build- 
l  er,  Manti,  son  of  Peter  and  Annie  C.  (Bertelseu), 
^^  born  in  Denmark,  January  10,  1840.  In  1862  the 
family  emigrated  to  this  country  and  located  in  Manti, 
where  the  father  followed  contracting  and  building  up  to 
within  two  years  of  his  death,  wdiich  occurred  in  1895,  in 
his  87tli  year;  mother  still  survives  at  the  advanced  age 
of  84  years.  When  the  family  came  to  Manti,  C.  P.  re- 
mained in  Salt  Lake,  where  he  engaged  in  various  occu- 
pations. He  for  a  time  Avas  engaged  in  freighting  from 
For-t  Benton  on  the  Missouri  to  Helena,  Mont.;  also  in 
mining.  December  1,  1868,  he  married  in  Heber  City, 
Utah,  Mary,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Sarah  Matthews, 
born  in  Bedfordshire,  England,  August  20,  1847.  Their 
children  are  as  follows:  Nymphas,  Peter  C,  deceased, 
Sarah  C,  Mary  E.,  Caroline,  Olive,  deceased,  Eliza  M. 
and  Leo, 


144  HISTOEY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Mr.  Larsen  moved  to  Manti  in  1871,  where  he  has 
followed  tlie  business  of  a  buildeT,  and  worked  four  years 
on  the  Manti  Temple.  He  was  a  policeman  for  a  time, 
and  six  years  City  JNIarshal,  member  of  City  Council  one 
term  arid  City  Justice  three  terins.  He  was  also  a  mem- 
ber of  the  (Constitutional  Convention,  and  in  the  fall  of 
1897  was  nominated  for  Mayor,  but  the  Republican  ticket 
was  defeated.  Mr.  Laisen  is  a  proj^ressive  man,  and 
stands  well  in  the  estimation  of  the  people. 

CAKSEN,  HAXS,  SK.,  farmer,  son  <»f  Lars  Nielsen  and 
Elizabeth  Hansen,  was  born  in  Denmark  December 
28,  1817.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  left 
Denmark  in  December,  1852,  with  Capt.  Fosgren's  com- 
pany of  emiiiranls.  On  the  road  aci-oss  tlie  i)lains  in  an 
ox  train  he  manie^l  Anu  ^laria  Joi-geuseu,  a  native  of 
Denmark.  They  came  to  Manti  in  1853  and  liave  resided 
here  since,  she  dying  several  years  ago.  During  the  In- 
dian Avars  he  acted  as  guard  and  did  his  share  of  the 
work.  He  has  a  farm  of  tliii-ty -eight  acres  in  the  ''Old 
Field,"  and  owns  his  resideuce  in  the  city.  His  time  is 
occupied  in  farming  and  carpentering.  Of  his  thirteen 
children  four  are  living:  Hans,  Jr.,  and  Nephi,  of  this 
city;  Elizabeth,  Avife  of  Alma  ^Marker,  Idaho  Falls,  Idaho, 
and  ^larA',  wife  of  Lorenzo  Buchanan,  OleuAvood,  Utah. 

pAHSEX,  HANS,  JK.,  of  Manti,  lumber  dealer,  is  a 
L  f^on  of  Hans  and  Maria  Larsen,  born  in  Manti  Feb- 
ruaiT  2,  1855.  The  parents,  a  sketch  of  Avhom  ap- 
pears elsewhere,  were  among  the  first  Scandinavian  Mor- 
mon emigrants  who  came  to  this  counti'y.  Our  subject 
was  raised  to  farm  work,  and  when  he  became  of  age 
engaged  in  lumbering  in  the  canyons.  For  two  years 
he  was  intei'ested  in  a  saw  mill  in  Manti  canyon,  which 
they  moved  to  Six  Mile  canyon,  Avhere  it  afteinvard 
burned.  Since  then  he  has  been  engaged  in  getting  out 
logs  which  he  has  cut  into  lumber  at  the  custom  mills 
and  disposes  of  the  lumber  in  Manti.  Mr,  Larsen  built  a 
fine  brick  residence  in  1894  with  modern  improA^ements 
at  a  cost  of  about  |3000.  He  married  in  jNIanti  May  15, 
1878,  to  Elsie  C,  daughter  of  Niels  P.  and  Elsie  C.  Dom- 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  145 

gaard,  born  iu  Manti,  March  28,  1857.  They  have  five 
children,  Ellis  M.,  Hans  L.,  Julian  D.,  Myrtle  J.  and  EU- 
raj .  Mrs.  Larsen's  parents  also  came  here  Avith  the  first 
Danish  emigrants.  Her  father  died  September  21,  1890, 
and  mother  still  lives  in  Manti.  Mr.  Larsen  has  lived  in 
Sanpete  county  all  his  life  and  is  well  and  favorably 
kLown. 

eATJSEX,  JEXS  P.,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
Peter  and  Anne  O.  Bertelsen,  was  born  in  Den- 
mark, November  4,  1848.  His  parents  joined  the 
Mormon  Church  and  came  to  Utah  in  1862,  in  Captain 
Horn's  train.  Through  the  advice  of  Erick  Ludwigsen, 
who  converted  them,  they  I'emoved  to  Manti,  where 
the\"  have  since  resided,  father  dying  in  1896,  mother 
still  living.  AA'hen  a  young  man  he  worked  in  the  mines 
of  Utah  and  Nevada  and  later  served  as  Sheriff  of  San- 
pete county  for  se^^en  years.  He  is  president  of  the  Home 
Fcrum  Society.  He  owns  50  aci'es  of  land,  besides  his 
city  I'esidence.  and  has  2700  sheep.  His  wife,  whom  he 
married  in  ^lanti,  was  Edith,  daughter  of  (xeorge  P.  and 
Edith  Patten  Billings.  They  have  seven  children:  Helen, 
Murray,  George  R.,  Loyd  B.,  Edith,  Hem-y  and  Den- 
ton D.'  ' 

CAPSON  H.  A.,  fanner,  son  of  Andrew  and  Christena 
E.,  was  born  in  Denmark  April  9,  1862.  The  family 
emigrated  in  March,  1864,  crossing  the  plains  in 
Capt.  Abner  Lowiw's  company,  reaching  ^lanti  in  Octo- 
ber. Father  followed  farming  and  worked  at  his  trade, 
shoemaking.  He  died  June  6,  1878.  Mother  died  August 
23,  1890.  H.  A.  was  raised  here  and  has  followed  farm- 
ing. Owns  fifty-five  acres  and  a  few  stock.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Manti  November  14,  1889,  to  Julia  C,  daughter 
of  Aamasa  E.  and  Olive  Merriam,  born  in  Manti,  May  17, 
1867.  They  have  had  five  children:  Harold  L.,  Edgar 
and  Br\'an,  living;  Harold  and  Llewellyn,  deceased. 

CIVINGSTON,   WILLIAM   D.,    Attorney-at-Law,   has 
his  office  in  the    Bank    building,    Manti,    son    of 
William    and    Lillias     (Dick)    Livingston,    bom 
March  26,  1871,  in  Salt  Lake  City.    When  at  the  age  of 


146  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

10,  the  family  moved  to  Fountain  Green,  this  county, 
where  he  managed  a  fai'm  for  his  father  for  several 
years,  then  bought  a  mill  and  manufactured  shingles 
about  two  years,  taught  school  one  year  at  Wales,  and 
two  3  ears  at  Fountain  Green,  during  which  time  he  was 
principal. 

In  the  fall  of  1894,  he  was  elected  County  Recorder 
of  Sanpete  Count}-,  on  the  Republican  ticket.  He  re- 
signed that  position  in  July,  1896,  being  appointed  Pros- 
ecuting Attorney  for  the  county,  to  succeed  Judge  J. 
Cochran.  He  held  the  office  until  Januaiy  1,  1897,  hav- 
ing been  renominated  b}^  his  party,  but  was  defeated  at 
the  polls.  Being  admitted  to  the  bar,  he  has  practiced 
before  the  District  Courts  held  at  Nephi,  Manti  and  Rich- 
field. Was  elected  City  Justice  of  the  Peace  in  1895,  re- 
signed that  office  in  1897.  Is  attorney  for  the  Manti  City 
Savings  Bnnk,  and  a  stockholder  therein.  Has  stock 
in  the  INIanti  Messenger,  of  whidi  company  he  is  a  direc- 
tor and  was  one  of  tlie  lessees,  and  assisted  also  in  its 
publication.  His  ]»r;»<ti(e  as  an  attorney  is  remunera- 
tive and  he  is  a  rising  and  promising  man  in  his  profes- 
sion; looked  up  to  as  one  to  depend  upon  where  good 
judgment  and  keen  perceptive  abilities  are  required. 
He  was  married  in  Manti  Temple  September  15,  1892, 
to  INIiss  Annie  B.,  daughter  of  Rsismns  and  Annie  C. 
Anderson  of  Fountain  Gretm,  and  a  native  of  Sanpete 
County,  born  in  Fountain  Green  ]March  30,  1870.  They 
have  three  children,  viz.:  AYilliam  R.,  Ernest  E.  and 
Annie  L. 

f  0\A^RY,  HON.  JOHN,  is  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Utah, 
I  and  tirst  settlers  of  Manti,  born  in  Lewis  county, 

^<  Mo.,  January  31,  1829,  is  a  son  of  John  and  May 
Wilcox  Lowry.  He  was -a  farmer  and  our  subject  was 
raised  on  a  farm.  The  father  was  one  of  the  earliest 
members  of  the  Mormon  Church,  having  joined  in  Lewis 
C(  unty.  Mo.  The  family,  consisting  of  father  and  mother 
and  six  children,  viz.,  James  H.,  John,  Abner,  Susan  L., 
Mary  A.,  George  M.  and  Sarah  J.,  came  to  Utah  in  1847. 
This  was  the  year  Salt  Lake  City  was  first  settled,  and 
the  family  came  in  soon  after  the  pioneers.    In  1849,  the 


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MANTI. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE   COUNTY.  147 

family  came  to  Manti,  where  they  have  since  resided,  the 
father  being  the  first  bishop,  called  August  26,  1850. 
Soon  after  their  arrival  in  Manti,  Parley  P.  Pratt,  with 
a  company  of  nearly  Mtj  men,  sent  out  to  explore  the 
jSouthern  country,  came  to  the  camp  for  volunteers,  and 
our  John  joined  the  expedition.  They  were  gone  nearly 
three  months  and  that  winter  explored  the  country 
along  the  Eio  Virgin  river  and  all  through  Southern 
I'^tah,  he  having  to  cross  the  mountains  on  snow  shoes 
on  his  return.  From  the  favorable  reports  made  of  this 
expedition,  settlers  went  down  and  located  Utah's  Dixie. 
In  1850,  he  with  eleven  others  went  from  Salt  Lake 
("it}',  located  and  ran  two  ferries  across  Green  River, 
one  at  the  lower  crossing,  which  was  on  the  main  line 
of  travel  to  Salt  Lake,  and  the  upper  to  Soda  Springs 
and  on  to  Oregon,  remained  there  one  year,  then  re- 
turned to  Manti,  fai-ming  quietly  until  1853,  when  trou- 
ble began  with  the  Indians,  Mr.  Lowry  having,  in  the 
spring  of  1849  been,  with  Col.  Scott,  in  the  first  skirmish 
with  Indians,  in  a.  company  of  25  volunteers  at  Battle 
Creek  (since  Pleasant  Grove),  who  located  the  Indians 
in  a  deep  canyon  east  of  the  town,  surrounding  them 
in  the  night,  intending  to  arrest  them,  when  the  Indians 
opened  fire,  and  in  the  fight  five  Indians  were  killed,  so 
when  the  Walker  war  star-ted,  every  able-bodied  man 
was  on  duty,  either  on  guard  at  the  settlements  or  in  the 
saddle.  The  Indians  came  over  from  Payson  canyon  to 
Mount  Pleasant  and  burned  a  sawmill  in  which  he  had 
one-third  interest,  attacked  the  people  in  the  night,  who, 
being  fortified,  drove  them  oiT,  killing  one.  During  the 
war  Mr.  Lowry  was  ever  on  the  alert  and  took  part 
therein  until  the  close  of  the  war.  In  1855  he  was  in 
the  Elk  Mountain  mission,  where  a  fort  and  settlement 
were  established,  in  June,  on  the  left  bank  of  the  Grand 
Iviver,  which  was  afterwards  broken  up  by  the  Ute  In- 
dians, who  killed  three  of  the  men.  He  made  a  trading 
trip  that  season  among  the  Navajos,  returning  in  Octo- 
ber, and  was  farming,  trading  and  teaming  until  the 
Black  Hawk  war  of  1865  started,  when  he  was  compelled 
to  take  an  active  part  therein.  It  lasted  two  years, 
flnring  which  time  all  were  on  the  defensive.    For  many 


148  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

years  was  interpreter  for  the  settlers,  with  the  Utes  and 
Shoshones  who  were  around  and  helped  make  treaties 
with  them.  He  bnilt  a  <j;rist  mill  in  1858,  at  the  Warm 
Springs  south  of  and  near  Manti.  Has  been  a  large 
Avool  grower  and  was  engaged  several  years  in  general 
merchandising,  with  his  son^,  James  H.,  which  not  prov- 
ing successful,  they  closed  out  in  1892.  Was  a  member 
of  the  City  Council,  terms  of  1851,  -53,  '57  and  '59;  was 
Assessor  and  (\dlector  of  the  county  four  years,  County 
C'lerk  two  years.  Was  elected  to  the  iiist  State  Legis- 
lature on  the  Republican  ticket,  and  has  always  been 
an  active  man  in  politics.  He  belonged  to  the  Nauvoo 
Legion  Avhen  at  tlie  age  of  sixteen,  in  Xauvoo,  111.  He 
has  a  commission,  dated  December  31,  1853,  paymaster, 
with  rank  of  First  Lieutenant,  Battallion  of  Infantry, 
Sanpete  Milita.iy  district  of  the  Nauvoo  Legion,  signed 
lirigliam  Young,  (jovemor,  and  A.  W.  Babbitt,  Sec- 
ret a  rj-. 

He  mairied  in  Manti,  October  27,  1851,  Sarah  J. 
Brown,  daughter  of  James  (1  and  Eunice,  who  were 
among  tlie  first  settlers  of  Manti,  and  afterwards  moved 
to  LTtah's  Dixie,  wliere  both  died  at  a  ripe  old  age.  By 
this  union  Mr.  Lowiw  had  nine  childix^n,  John,  James  H., 
deceased,  Sarah,  William  B.,  Eunice,  Olive,  Ida,  Dora 
and  Ethel,  has  54  grandchildren.  He  maiTied  (2)  Mary 
A.  Allen,  daughter  of  Daniel,  a  pioneer  of  1850.  Chil- 
dren, Daniel,  Mary  A.,  Clara,  Eva,  Diantha  and  Orson. 
Mr.  Lowry  was  always  thorough,  active  and  industrious, 
took  a  keen  interest  in  all  things  periaining  to  the  town, 
and  enjoyed  in  a  degree  the  confidence  of  his  associates, 
and  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  INlormon  Church. 

1  0\\'KY,  JOHN,  JK.,  farmer  and  wool-grower,  was 
I  born  in  Manti,  Oct.  3,  1852.  He  is  a.  sou  of  Hon.  John 

^w  and  Sarah  J.  (Brown)  Lowry,  who  were  among  the 
earliest  settlers  of  Manti.  When  John  reached  the  age 
of  15  he  engaged  for  several  years  in  hauling  produce  to 
the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada,  and  then  took 
up  1()0  acres  of  land  south  of  Manti,  where  he  raises 
mostly  ha\,  and  keens  from  40  to  50  head  of  stock.  He 
is  also  interested  in  wool-growing  with  his  brother,  Wil- 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  149 

liain  B.,  aud  tliey  own  over  3000  head  of  sheep.  He  is 
also  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Co.,  the 
Messenger  Printing:,  Co.,  president  of  the  North  Six- 
Mile  Creek  Irrij^atiou  Co.,  and  secretary  and  treasurer  of 
the  Pioneer  Water  Co.  He  was  a  policeman  about  four- 
teen years.  City  Marshal  a  number  of  years  and  Consta- 
ble. He  has  built  a  nice  residence  in  town.  Mr.  Lowry 
is  one  of  the  substantial  men  of  Mauti,  and  is  an  honor- 
able and  upright  citizen.  He  married  March  13,  1870, 
Kency,  daughter  of  William  and  Henrietta  Anderson, 
who  was  also  born  in  Manti,  September  12,  1855.  Their 
children  are  Lawrence,  Harold,  Irwin,  Sarah  J.,  Henri- 
etta, Olive,  Kosella,  Naomi  and  Eva;  Kenneth  and  Wil- 
liam deceased. 

I  OWRY,  WILLIAM  B.,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  son 
I  of  John  aud  Sarah  T.  Brown  Lowiy,  was  born  in 
^»  Manti,  December  21,  1857,  aud  reared  upon  the 
farm.  He  owns  a  nice  farm  of  120  acres,  one  and  a  half 
miles  south  of  the  city,  and  has  an  interest  with  his 
father  and  brother,  John,  in  a  700-acre  tract,  which  is 
managed  veiy  successfully  by  the  brothers,  who  have 
over  oue  hundred  head  of  cattle  and  several  thousand 
sheei).  He  is  well  known  as  a  musician,  and  has  served 
as  school  trustee  for  one  term  and  Treasurer  of  the  city 
for  six  years.  He  is  one  of  the  stockholders  of  the  Cen- 
tral Utah  Wool  Co.,  and  a  prominent  man  in  the  com- 
munit}^  He  was  mari4ed  November  11,  1881,  to  Ellen 
Hansen,  daughter  of  Jens  and  Charlotte  Peterson  Han- 
sen. 

She  Avas  born  in  Manti,  July  18,  1858,  her  parents 
being  among  the  early  settlers  of  1853.  Her  father  die(} 
here,  and  her  mother  is  living  at  the  age  of  69  years.  The 
family  consists  of  six  children,  Ella,  Wliliam  H.,  Gerald, 
Charlotte,  James  H.  and  Maurice. 

I  UDYICKSON,  EIvIK,  farmer,  was  born  in  Copenha- 
I  gen,  Denmark,  April  22,  1824.  He  joined  the  Mor- 
^^  mon  church  in  1851,  and  with  his  wife  and  son 
Peter  J.  emigrated  to  Utah.  They  crossed  the  plains  in 
Percy  Olsen's  ox  train  company,  reaching  Salt  Lake  City 


150  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

October  5,  1854.  He  located  in  Manti  aud  took  up  ten 
acres  of  laud,  following  the  trade  of  a  weaver.  lu  both 
Indian  wars  he  took  an  active  part  aud  his  sou  Peter  J. 
was  killed  in  the  I>la<k  Hawk  war.  He  now  owns  twenty 
acres  of  tine  farniiu".*  land  west  and  ninety  acres  south  of 
the  city.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Denmark  June 
16,  1814,  was  ^laiy  rhristo})liersou,  the  mother  of  Peter 
J.,  their  only  child.  The  second  wife,  married  here,  was 
Christina  Larsen,  wlio  had  but  one  child;  both  are  dead. 
His  third  wife,  Annie  St<Mk,  resides  in  S^terliug.  They 
have  had  ten  children:  (Mii-istena,  INIary,  Emily,  Annie, 
Erick,  So])ln()uie,  Katy  Lillian,  Elmer,  Yida  Leonia  aud 
INIinuie  M.  (deceased). 

I  UKE,  CHAKLES  O.,  lai  uier,  of  Mauti,  is  a  sou  of  Wil- 
I  liam  aud  Emma  (Perkins)  Luke,  born  in  Manches- 
^w  ter,  Euiiland,  .Taunary  25,  1829.  In  1853  he  came  to 
this  country  aud  ci-ossed  tiie  ])laius  in  an  ox  train  with 
Capt.  A.  Hai'uiou,  arriviu<;-  in  Mauti  in  December  in  time 
to  join  the  Mauti  militia  aud  take  part  in  the  Walker 
war.  He  subsequently  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
W'ar.  Roon  after  his  arrivel  he  took  uj)  a  piece  of  land 
and  has  made  farmiuji  his  occupation.  He  has  now  a 
farm  of  40  acres,  and  his  residence  in  town.  Mr.  Luke 
has  always  been  a.  worker  in  the  Sunday  school,  in  which 
he  was  a  teacher  some  thirty  years.  He  married  in  Man- 
chester, Euiilaud,  February  27,  1853,  ]\riss  Ann  Beaver, 
and  the  folh)wiuji-  are  their  children.  The  living  reside 
in  Orangeville,  Emers^  county,  except  Charles  W.,  Emma 
A.,  deceased,  Charles  W.,  farmer,  Elizabeth  C,  Sarah  J. 
and  ]\rarv  'SI.,  deceased,  Margaret  B.,  wife  of  Christian 
•Poulsen,  Thomas  J.,  deceased,  Joseph  O.,  farmer,  aud 
Benjamin  F.,  who  is  a  scliool  teacher  and  secretar;\'-treas- 
urer  and  business  manager  of  the  Co-op.  store.  Mr.  Luke 
liad  the  misfortune  to  lose  his  wife  September  14,  1888. 

I  I'KE,  JOHN  T.,  farmer,  son  of  AA'iliam  aud  Mary, 
I  was  born  in  Mauti,  May  26,  1861.  He  was  raised 
^^  to  farming,  and  at  the  age  of  16  began  freighting 
produce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada,  which 
he  followed  several  vears.     Now  owns  and  cultivates  a 


» 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  151 

nice  little  faiiii.  A\'as  maiTied  in  St.  George,  October 
19,  1881,  to  Heurietta  C,  daughter  of  Oswald  aud  Cath- 
erine Barlow,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City,  June  IT,  1861. 
They  have  had  six  children:  John  H.,  Grace  H.,  Mary 
('.,  Vera  E.  and  Emma  ^[.,  living;  Winford,  deceased. 


I  IKE,  ilOX.  WILLIAM,  farmer,  of  Manti,  was  born 
I  in  Manchester,  England,  September  2,  1834.  His 
^  parents  were  A\'illiam  and  Emma  (Perkins)  Luke. 
His  father  was  one  of  the  early  members  of  the  Mormon 
church;  was  a  machinist  by  trade,  and  came  to  Sanpete 
county  in  1850.  Of  the  family,  three  sons,  the  eldest  be- 
ing married,  followed  him  here,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake 
October  16,  1853,  with  Capt.  Harmon's  train.  In  Decem- 
ber they  came  to  Manti.  The  father,  with  three  others, 
was  Ivilled  by  the  Indians  and  his  team  and  wagon 
stolen  at  Eountain  Green  while  en  route  to  Salt  Lake  to 
meet  his  sons.  Our  subject  arrived  here  while  the 
Walker  war  was  in  i)rogre8s  and  took  his  part  in  it  and 
later  Avhen  the  Black  Hawk  war  broke  out  he  was  a 
Lieutenant  in  Company  B  of  the  home  militia.  In  1851 
he  took  up  some  land  near  Manti  and  now  has  a  nice 
farm  of  thirty-six  acres  beside  a  veiw  comfortable  home 
in  town.  He  is  an  active,  energetic  man  in  business  and 
politics  and  stands  well  in  the  community.  Is  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Manti  Co-op  and  for  several  years  was  a 
director;  was  for  a  time  president  of  the  Co-op  Herding 
Institution,  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  new  Union 
Flouring  Mills.  He  was  a.  member  of  the  school  board 
five  years.  Supervisor  thirteen  years.  County  Commis- 
sioner three  years.  City  Council  several  years,  and  Mayor 
of  the  city  four  years.  He  was  married  Januaiw  10,  1857, 
to  Mary,  daughter  of  William  and  Elizabeth  Haydock, 
Their  children  are:  William  H.,  George  H.  (deceased), 
John  T.,  Joseph  (deceased),  Mary  E.,  Elizabeth  A.,  Char- 
lotte J.,  Alonzo  (deceased),  Franklin  (deceased)  and 
Albert  E..  Mrs.  Luke  came  to  LTtali  with  her  mother  in 
n  hand  cart  company  in  1856.  Many  of  the  company  died 
of  exposure  aud  her  mother  lost  an  eye  through  the  same 
'ause. 


152  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTy. 

I  UND,  CHRISTIAN  1\,  son  of  Christian  C.  and  Stine 
I  M.  Peterson,  was  born  in  Ybe,  Jyland,  Denmark, 
^^  FebruaiT  24,  1832.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  oar- 
I>enter  and  millwrij'ht,  and  owned  a  mill,  which  he  sold 
before  coming  to  this  country'.  Joined  the  Mormon 
Church  in  1867  and  in  1868  came  to  Utah  with  his  fam- 
ily, crossing  the  plains  in  an  oxtrain  under  Bishop  Hans 
Jensen,  and  located  in  Manti,  where  he  followed  his 
trade.  He  ran  a  flouring  mill  for  fourteen  years,  and  in 
ccmpany  with  Greorge  Sidwell  and  George  Spicer,  built 
the  Excelsior  flouring  mill,  now  run  by  Louis  F.  Becker, 
Was  maiTied  in  Snested,  Denmark,  in  December,  1858, 
to  Mary  A.  Horeted.  She  died  in  Denmark,  leaving  one' 
son,  Thomas,  now  a  resident  of  Ephraim.  Married  again 
in  December,  1862,  to  Mai*ia  Petersoui,  a  native  of  Den- 
mark. She  died  Octobea*  0th,  1896.  Her  children  are 
Christian,  Stine  M.  and  Peter,  living;  Christian  and  Mary 
A.,  deceased. 

fX\  ACKEY,  JOHN,  farmer,  of  Manti,  born  in  Lancaster 
/  i  I  county.  Pa.,  :\Iay  20,  1838.  The  family  joined  the 
I  *  Mormon  cliurch  about  1836,  and  emigrated  to  this 
country  and  settled  in  Manti  in  1852,  with  a  family  of 
five,  Harriet,  Ann,  Samuel,  Sarah  and  John.  The  family 
took  up  land  near  Manti  and  took  part  in  the  Indian 
troubles,  both  in  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk  wars.  The 
father  died  August  9,  1890.  Mr.  Mackey  has  a  good  farm 
of  60  acres,  and  a  comfortable  home  in  town.  He  is  one 
of  the  representative  citizens  of  Manti.  He  married 
November  11,  1862,  Maria,  daughter  of  James  and  Han- 
nah Davenpoi-t,  by  whom  he  had  two  children,  Joseph  S. 
(deceased),  and  Elizabeth  A.,  wife  of  A.  Reid.  His  wife 
died  and  he  again  married,  March  4,  1868,  to  Susannah, 
daughter  of  Henry  and  Ann  Parsons,  who  died  March 
26,  1885,  leaving  nine  children,  Phoebe  A.,  John,  Dora 
B.,  Ann  E.,  Henry,  Sarah  E.  (deceased),  Susanna,  James 
A.  and  Luella. 

rr\  ADSEN,  DAVID,   farmer,  son   of   Hans   and   Anna 

/  I  I   Christiansen,   was  born  in  Manti,  June  25,   1858, 

'       '   and  raised  a  farmer.     He  owns  about  50  acres  of 

good  land,  and  has  a  nice,  new  residence  in  the  city.  His 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  153 

wife  was  Olive  C,  daughter  of  Amasa  E.  aud  Olive  D, 
Merriam,  born  in  Manti,  March  27,  18G3.  Thej  were 
married  in  Logan  temple,  November  14,  1883,  and  have 
four  living  ehildren,  Orliu,  born  October  1,  1885,  Harold, 
November  2,  1888;  Leonia, "  September  3,  1890,  and 
Frances,  December  25,  1896,  Amasa  E.  being  dead. 

IJl  ADSEX,  JAMES  1'.,  postmaster,  proprietor  of  Mad- 
/  1  I  sen  House  and  agent  Co-op  Wagon  and  Machine 
'  ^  Co.,  was  born  in  Kanders,  Denmark,  June  9,  1860. 
The  family  emigrated  to  Utah  in  1863  and  located  in 
Manti,  AA'heie  the  parents  died.  He  was  raised  on  the  farm 
and  educated  in  the  common  schools,  taking  a  two-years' 
course  in  the  Deseret  University.  Was  engaged  as  a 
teacher  for  live  or  six  years,  and  entered  the  employ  of 
the  Co-op.  \\'agon  ami  Marhine  Co.  as  traveling  sales- 
man, where  he  has  since  worked  successfully,  except  dur 
ing  the  years  1895-156,  when  he  was  clerk  of  Sanpete  coun- 
ty, elected  on  the  only  successful  Republican  ticket.  He 
handles  all  kinds  of  implements,  machinery  and  vehicles, 
and  is  a  successful  salesman.  The  Madsen  House  was 
opened  under  his  management  early  in  1898,  newly  fur- 
nished, aud  is  headquarters  for  commercial  travelers.  He 
was  ai)pointed  postmaster  by  President  McKinley,  and 
took  charge  of  the  oftice  December  1,  1897. 

His  wife  was  Grace  E.,  daughter  of  Amasa  and  Mar 
til  a.  Tucker,  born  in  Faiiwiew,  May  15,  1875.     They  were 
married  in  Fairview,  June  12,  1895,  and  have  one  child, 
f\arlisle  B.,  born  :March  22,  1896. 

^Y^  ADSEN,  JENS,  farmer,  of  Manti,  son  of  Haus  and 
Ml  Annie  ((3hristensen),  born  in  Denmark  January  22, 
'  ^  1848.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  Church,  and 
in  the  fall  of  1852  emigrated  to  this  country.  Their  com- 
pany was  the  first  Danish  Mormon  emigrants  who  cam:e 
to  this  country.  Capt.  Fosgreen  brought  them  out  and 
they  crossed  the  plains  with  ox  teams,  arriving  in  Salt 
Lake  City  about  one  year  from  the  time  they  left  their 
native  land.  The  Church  authorities  advised  them  to 
locate  in  Sanpete  county^,  so  they  came  to  Spring  City, 
but  shortlv  after  removed  to  Manti.     The  father  was  a 


154  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

carpenter  and  Avheelwriglit,  wliicli  occupation  he  fol- 
lowed here  for  manj^  years.  He  died  in  October,  1873, 
and  the  mother  Julj^  24,  1868.  Jens  has  followed  farm- 
ii;g  and  now  has  a  nice  farm  of  120  acres  near  town,  well 
stocked,  and  a  home  in  toAvn.  He  took  part  with  the 
others  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  In.  1866  he  made  a  trip 
back  to  the  river  in  a  church  train  after  emigrants.  Mr. 
Madsen  is  one  of  ]Manti's  representative  citizens.  He 
married  January  23,  1871,  Mary,  daughter  of  Rasmus  H. 
and  Magdalene  Hougaard,  born  in  Denmark,  March  5, 
1848,  died  May  28,  1891,  leaving  four  children,  Frank, 
Charlotte  A.  (deceased),  Frederick  I.  and  Nettie. 

rr\  ADSEX,  PETEK  H.,  farmer,  of  Manti,  is  a  son  of 
111  Henneng  and  Karen,  born  in  Denmark,  October  1, 
'  ^  1847.  In  1866  the  i)arents  emigrated  to  this  country 
Avith  four  children.  They  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox- 
train,  and  Avhen  the}'  reached  Echo  canyon  the  mother 
died.  They  located  in  Manti,  where  the  father  died  in 
1890.  Peter  IT.  has  made  farming  the  occupation  of  his 
life,  in  Avhich  he  has  been  quite  successful,  having  at 
present  a  fine  farm  of  180  acres  and  a  nice  residence  just 
north  of  the  Temple.  He  is  president  of  the  Manti  Co-op. 
Sheep-Herding  and  Wool-GroAving  Institution,  and  a 
large  stockholder.  Mr.  Madsen  is  a  representative  far- 
mer o'f  Sanpete  county,  and  an  honorable,  upright  man. 
He  Avas  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  December  12,  1870,  to 
Maria,  daughter  of  Jens  and  Sophia  Hansen.  Their  chil- 
dren are  Cora  D.,  Nelson,  Antoinette,  Luella,  Eunice,  Or- 
son, Frances  and  Stanford. 

rr\  AIBEN,  JOHN  BPAY,  second  counsellor  in  presi- 
I  1  I  dency  of  the  Sanpete  Stake  of  Zion,  son  of  William 
f  y  and  Catherine  Williams  Carter,  was  born  in  Brigh- 
ton, Sussex,  England,  June  16,  1826.  He  was  baptized  Iby 
John  Banks,  London,  England,  July  27,  1848.  Ordained 
a  Deacon  by  John  Banks  January  10,  1849.  Was  or- 
dained a  Priest  by  John  Hyde,  Sr.,  November  5,  1849, 
and  an  Elder  by  Apostle  John  Taylor  June  16,  1850.  Was 
appointed  president  of  Frisbury  Branch,  London  confer- 
ence, December  7,  1851,  and  president  of  Holborn  Branch 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  155 

April  30,  1854.  Started  for  Utah  April  22,  1855.,  when 
he  was  appointed  president  of  the  First  ward  ship,  Sam- 
uel Curling.  Was  appointed  Chaplain  in  Capt.  Moses 
Tliurston's  Independent  company  July  3,  1855.  Arriyed 
in  Salt  Lake  City  September  28,  1855.  Was  ordained  a 
Seyenty  in  the  Eighth  quorum  by  John  Brown  February' 
17,  1856,  and  ordained  president  of  the  quorum  by  Presi- 
dent Joseph  Young  December  11,  1857.  Appointed  bishop 
of  Manti  August  1,  1875,  and  ordained  a  High  Priest  and 
set  apart  as  Bishop  by  President  Brigham  Young  Au- 
gust 2,  1875.  Set  apart  as  second  counsellor  in  presi- 
dency of  Sanpete  Stakei  by  President  Brigham  Young- 
July  7,  1877,  and  set  apart  as  first  assistant  to  president 
of  Manti  temple  by  Apostle  A.  H.  Lund  October  18,  1891. 


rn  ARTIX,  REV.  GEORGE  W.,  pastor  of  the  Presby- 
1  I  I  terian  Church,  was  born  of  Scotch-Irish  parentage 
f  I  in  Hocking  County.  Ohio.  He  was  brought  up  on 
a  faiTu,  receiying  a  common  school  education.  He  taught 
district  schools  four  winters,  being  conyertecl  to  Chris- 
tianity during  the  time.  When  23  years  of  age  he  entered 
the  Ohio  Uniyersity  at  Athens,  from  which  he  graduated 
in  the  class  of  '75  with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  After  teaching 
another  year  as  principal  of  schools  at  Willoughby,  Ohio, 
he  entered  Union  Theological  Seminary,  New  York,  from 
which  he  graduated  in  the  class  of  '79.  Recognizing  a 
call  to  preach  the  gospel,  he  was  licensed  by  the  presby- 
tery of  Athens  June  27,  1879.  He  was  married  at  Lan- 
caster, Ohio,  July  15,  1879,  to  Matilda  Peebles  Work,  and 
with  her  came  to  Manti  in  September,  1879,  taking 
charge  of  the  Presbyterian  Church  here  and  at  Ephraim. 
He  was  ordained  by  the  presbyter^'  of  Utah  at  Logan 
August  21,  1880.  From  1881  to  1881  he  caiTied  on  regu- 
lar work  and  superintended  the  erection  of  the  church  .it 
Manti  and  chapels  at  Ephraim  and  Gunnison.  He  was 
district  missionary  in  the  presbyters^  of  Utah  and  Wood 
Riyer  from  1881  to  1887,  but  resigned  to  continue  work 
in  Manti.  April  27,  1893,  he  was  installed  pastor  of  the 
church  at  Manti,  where  he  remains.  He  is  an  enthusias- 
tic church  worker  and  commands  the  respect  of  all. 


156  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

rn  AYLETT,  WILLIAM  F.,  retired  farmer  and  mer- 
/  1  I  chant,  son  of  James  and  Mary  Vau<»bn  Maylett^ 
I  I  was  born  in  Shropshire,  England,  April  10,  182G. 
His  mother  died  when  he  was  three  days  old,  and  befoi'e 
his  eighth  3  ear  his  father  died,  leaving  him  alone,  when 
he  was  compelled  to  do  odd  jobs  to  earn  his  board  for 
three  years.  When  11  yeai*s  of  age  he  entered  the  racing 
stables  and  became  (juite  a  famous  jockey  in  England, 
so  that  when  oidy  17  he  had  ridden  in  many  noted  races. 
He  followed  the  jockey  business  until  1811,  when  he 
joined  the  Moiiiion  church  and  soon  quit  the  turf,  as  four 
weeks  after  IxM-oming  a  church  member  he  started  out  as 
a  traveling  elder.  In  Lsr^i  he  came  to  the  LTnited  States, 
being  marrie<l  I0  Bessie  Ku<ld  on  April  (Jtli  of  that  year 
while  on  his  way  across  the  ocean. 

During  the  years  1853  to  1850  he  was  stationed  at 
Keokuk,  Iowa,  to  kee])  the  several  church  members  to- 
gether who  could  not  journey  to  Salt  Lake.  While  in  this 
city  he  was  engaged  in  a  largi*  wholesale  and  retail  hard- 
ware store.  In  185()  he  came  to  Utah  with  an  ox  team, 
and  paid  the  way  of  eight  othei-s,  having  to  boiTOW  the 
money  necessary,  lie  traveled  in  ('apt.  jNIerrill's  com- 
pany, arriving  in  Salt  Lake  (Mty  in  August,  when  he  was 
counselled  by  Presidents  Young  and  Kimball  to  con- 
tinue to  San])ete,  which  he  did,  and  located  in  Manti. 
After  beginning  fann  work  he  was  called  to  return  to 
Keokuk  with  a  hand-cart  company,  and  started  from  Salt 
I..ake  City  April  :23,  1857.  They  took  no  live  stock,  but 
were  harnessed  and  hitched  to  the  carts.  In  his  team 
were  Daniel  Mcintosh,  William  Harris  and  himself, 
forming  a  spike— one  on  each  side  and  one  in  the  lead — 
he  being  the  leader. 

They  went  to  Keokuk,  where  they  were  engaged  in 
various  kinds  of  missicmary  work  until  1858,  when  he 
was  called  home,  driving  back  with  horses  and  wagons. 
He  returned  to  Manti,  and  in  1802  was  counselled  by 
President  Young  to  start,  a  daily  to  see  whether  good 
butter  could  be  made  in  Sanpete.  He  started  and  built 
up  the  business  on  his  own  ranch,  making-  it  quite  profit- 
able for  about  twenty  years,  keeping  20  to  30  cows  all 
the  time.     His  fine  ranch  of  150  acres  is  located  on  the 


HISTORY    OF   SA.NPETE   COUNTY.  157 

county  road,  about  live  aud  a  half  miles  noi'tliwest  of  this 
oity.  He  was  oue  of  the  organizers  and  dii-ectors  of  the 
Manti  Co-op,  store,  aud  a  clerk  in  that  institution  for  ten 
years.  He  is  one  of  the  stockholders  of  the  Deseret  Tele- 
graph Company,  a  member  of  the  High  Priests,  and  was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  in  1861-2-3-4:  and  1871-72, 
and  Probate  Judge  of  Sanpete  county  for  the  year  1805. 
During  the  Black  Hawk  war  he  was  in  1865-66  ex- 
press messenger,  whose  duty  was  to  cany  dispatches  at 
any  moment,  night  or  day,  on  horseback  between  the 
towns  of  Manti,  Ephraiui,  (luuuisou  and  Twelve-Mile 
Creek.  About  1871  he  built  his  home  at  a  cost  of  nearly 
$5000,  the  nails  then  sold  at  60  cents  a.  pound  and  glass 
at  |60  a  box.  His  second  wife  was  Elizabeth  Ann  Hall, 
now  deceased,  who  left  no  children  living.  The  last  wife 
is  Margaret  Wilson,  who  has  four  children,  Ann  W'.,  wife 
of  Ezra  Billings,  John  F.,  stockman  and  farmer,  Mary 
E.,  wife  of  Frank  Tuttle,  and  Henry,  in  partnership  with 
his  brother  on  the  ranch,  all  residing  in  this  city. 

rY\  'AL1J8TEK,  JOHN  DANIEL  THOMPSON,  presi- 
I  i  I  dent  of  Manti  Temple,  son  of  William  J.  F.  and 
i  I  Eliza  Thompson,  was  bom  in  Delaware.  He  grew 
up  in  Philadelphia  and  was  engaged  in  shoemaking,  car- 
pentering and  blacksmithing.  Was  baptized  October  12, 
1844,  and  ordained  a  priest  September  27,  1846.  W^as 
maiiied  at  the  age  of  25  to  Ellen  Handley  and  removed  to 
Council  Bluffs,  Iowa,  and  engaged  as  a,  storekeeper  for 
J.  E.  Johnston.  Came  to  Utali  in  1851  in  Alfred  Cordon's 
company.  He  joined  Ciaptain  Ballo's  brass  band  and  be- 
came lieutenant,  playing  the  cornet.  Was  called  at  the 
conference  of  April,  1853,  on  a  mission  to  Great  Britain, 
where  he  spent  three  years.  On  his  retur^n  was  appointed 
president  of  the  sixteenth  (luorum  of  Seventies  and 
elected  major  of  the  Second  Battalion  in  the  Salt  Lake 
Militarv"  district.  Served  as  a  member  of  the  Desei-et 
Dramatic  Association  and  was  a  prominent  actor.  He 
filled  a  missioni  to'  the  Eastern  States  and  uponi  his  re- 
lease was  again  sent  to  England.  LTpon  his  return  he 
brought    a   company   of   emigrants    across   the    plains. 


158  HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY. 

Served  as  City  Marshal,  Tenitorial  Marshal  aud  chief  of 
the  Salt  Lake  (Ity  tire  department.  He  then  labored  for 
some  time  in  the  Endowment  House  and  later  superin- 
tended the  ]!)eiseret  AA'oolen  Mills.  Was  called  to  assist 
in  temple  work  at  St.  CTeorj2,e  and  appointed  president 
of  the  Temple  in  April,  1877.  He  was  ordained  a  high 
priest  by  President  Young  and  set  apart  to  xireside  over 
the  stake,  which  he  did  for  about  twelve  years.  Was 
elected  president  of  the  Eio  Mrgin  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany, president  of  the  Gardener  Club  and  St.  George 
Dramatic  Association,  and  brigadier-general  of  the 
Washington  county  brigade.  On  September  11,  18(i9,  he 
was  elected  lieutenant-colonel  in  the  Nauvoo  Legion.  In 
ISDH  he  was  called  to  assist  in  the  Temple  at  Salt  Lake 
City  and  later  to  ^lauti  Temple,  wIum'c-  he  still  labors  in 
a  most  creditable  manner. 

rn  EKKIAM,  AM  AS  A  E.,  deceased,  one  of  the  first  set- 
/  1  I  tiers  of  Manti,  son  of  Edwin  P.  and  Hannah  B. 
I  ^  I'inch,  was  born  in  New  Hai-tford,  Oneida  count}", 
New  York,  October  25,  1832.  His  father  died  in  Nauvoo, 
111.,  September  14,  1842,  and  his  mother  married  Isaac 
^Morley,  wdio  led  the  first  company  of  settlers  to  this 
city.  He  grew  to  manhood  and  was  engaged  for  two 
years  as  mail  canier  between  Salt  Lake  City 
and  San  Bernardino,  Cal.,  afterward  serving  as 
County  Assessor  and  Collector  for  about  25  years;  City 
L'ecorder  about  14  years,  and  City  Assessor  and  Collec- 
tor a  number  of  years.  About  1864  he  went  to  the  Mis- 
souri river  for  merchandise,  and  through  cold  and  ex- 
posure became  partially  paralyzed.  He  took  an  active 
part  in  church  and  public  matters  till  his  death,  Febru- 
ary 1,  1807.  His  wife  was  Olive  D.,  daughter  of  Andrew 
and  Hannah  Hull  Lytle,  born  in  Caldwell  county.  Mo., 
July  18,  1837.  They  were  married  in  Beaver,  Utah,  May 
27,  1858,  and  have  eight  children:  Amasa  E.,  Hannah, 
PJllen,  wife  of  Jedediah  Crawford;  Olive  C,  wife  of  David 
Madsen,  Loretta,  wife  of  Silas  M.  Callaway,  Juliaj  C, 
wife  of  Andrea  Larsen;  Andrew  L.,  married  to  Eliza 
Boyington;  Ivosetta  and  Orissa,  at  home. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  159 

rf\  innUAM,  AMASA  E.,  farmer  and  luinbermau,  sou 
I  1  I  (tf  Aiiiasa  E.  aud  Olive  I).,  A^as  born  in  Salt  Lake 
/  ^  ^'ity,  l>ec.  31,  1851).  He  was  followinji  logging  and 
lumbering  for  many  years,  and  in  company  with  his 
fjither  and  brother  Andrew,  owned  a  mill  in  Six-Mile 
canyon,  selling  in  July,  1895,  to  Edwin  Works,  for  whom 
he  has  since  worked.  He  owns  his  city  residence  and  is 
a  promising  young  man.  In  November,  1895,  he  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council  on  the  Republican 
ticket.  His  wife,  Avhom  he  marrie<l  in  Manti,  October 
19,  1884,  Avas  Mary  E.,  daughter  of  William  J.  and  Eliza 
Killpack.  They  have  three  children,  Edwin  L.,  Amasa 
C  and  Ruth. 

fr\  EKIHAM,  ANDREW  L.,  son  of  Amasa  E.  and  Olive 
ill  1^-1  ^vas  born  in  Manti  January  11,  1869.  He  was 
'  '  raised  here  and  has  folhtAved  lumbering.  In  com- 
pany with  his  father  and  brother,  he  owned  a  sawmill 
in  Six-Mile  canyon,  having  recently  sold  out.  H^  is  a 
member  of  the  I.  O.  O.  1".,  b«4ng  vice-grand,  aud  one  of 
the  trustees.  Was  married  in  Manti  December  19,  1894, 
to  ^lary  E.,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Hannah  Boyington, 
born  in  Manti  October  31,  1874.  Thev  have  two  children: 
Lytle,  born  November  6,  1895,  and  Ruby,  July  28,  1897. 

rn  ETCALF,  JOHN  E.,  proprietor  Metcalf  Hotel,  son  of 
/  I  I  John  E.  ami  Mary  Waslin,  was  bom  in  Hull,  Eng- 
'  I  land,  June  23,  1839.  His  father  was  a  cabinet- 
maker, joined  the  Mormon  church  in  1849,  and  emigrated 
with  his  family  to  Utah  in  1853,  crossing  the  plains  with 
Capt.  Spencer's  ox-train.  The  father  located  at  Fayette, 
running  a  flour  mill  and  stock  raiser.  He  died  there  in 
1887;  mother  died  March  26,  1884.  John  engaged  in  farm- 
ing and  stock  raising,  and  in  1876  removed  to  Gunnison, 
'where  he  owns  a.  good  50-acre  farm.  He  was  superintend- 
ent of  the  Gunnison  Co-op.  store  two  years,  and  per- 
formed a  mission  of  two  years  in  the  Southern  States.  In 
1891  he  leased  the  Temple  House  and  removed  to  this 
city,  conducting  the  house  for  five  years,  afterward  pur- 
chasing his  present  place,  where  he  has  now  a  nice,  quiet 
li(  tel.    He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Co. 


160  HI8T0KY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

His  wife  was  Mary  K.,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Polly 
Benson  Bartholomew,  born  in  Pottowatamie  county,  la., 
April  21),  184:7.  They  were  married  in  Fayette,  March  10, 
18G5,  and  haAe  had  ten  children,  Sarah  E.,  Mary  E.,  Em- 
ma E.,  John  F.,  Lillie  M.,  Myra  J.,  Joseph  L.,  Clyde  and 
Leland  W.,  living,  Claudius  B.,  dead. 

Pr\  ICKLESOX,  JENS,  farmer,  wool-grower  and  stock- 
/  I  I  raiser,  son  of  Mickel  Sorenson  and  Petreni  Hansen, 
P  \  was  born  in  Henmark,  May  2,  1853.  His  mother 
emigrated  to  TTtali  in  18G1,  after  the  death  of  his  father 
and  he  walke<l  m<tst  all  the  distance  across  the  plains. 
They  were  residents  of  Mount  IMeasaut  and  Circle  Val- 
le^^,  being  driven  from  the  latter  place  by  the  Indians. 
At  the  age  of  16  he  worked  for  six  bushels  of  wheat  a 
month,  and  at  17,  was  a  placer  miner  in  Montana.  He 
folh)W(Ml  tlic  l)nsin<*ss  of  freighting  for  twelve  years,  and 
with  his  savings  j^nrchased  a  hue  farm  near  this  city. 
His  farm  contains  200  acres,  and  yields  handsomely  from 
grain  and  stock  raising.  He  is  extensively  engaged  in 
wool-gi-owing,  is  a  shareholder  in  the  ^Messengei*  and  Pio- 
neer Water  Co.,  and  an  energetic  and  successful  man. 
Being  reai-ed  in  the  Mormon  church,  he  is  an  active  mem- 
ber and  counsellor  to  the  bishop  of  his  ward. 

He  was  married  in  Salt  Lak(^  City,  June  24,  1880,  to 
Annie  C.  Anderson,  daughter  of  Niels  and  Anne  T.,  a 
native  of  Denmark.  Their  children  are  James  M.,  Annie 
C,  Elmer  A.,  Minerva,  Alice,  Lydia  M.  and  Catherine,  de- 
ceased. 

fr\  OFFITT,  ANDBEW  J.,  decease^l,  son  of  James  and 
ill  Elizabeth,  was  boni  in  Ireland  :\Iay  7,  1818.  The 
'  l  famih'  came  to  the  United  States  when  he  was  an 
infant  and  located  in  Iowa,  where  he  grew  up  and  was 
married.  His  wife  died  soon  after  maiTiage  and  he 
started  for  California  in  the  oO's  during  the  gold  excite- 
ment. When  he  reached  Salt  Lake  City  he  joined  the 
Mormon  Church,  then  went  on  to  California,  from  which 
he  soon  returned,  and  served  as  coachman  for  Brighani 
Young  for  several  years.  In  1860  he  came  to  jNlanti,  be- 
ing sent  by  President  Young  as  bishop.    He  held  the  po- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  161 

sitioii  for  fifteen  years,  aud  ^vas  president  of  the  Co-O}) 
store  several  years.  He  took  au  active  part  iu  the  Bhu-k 
Hawk  war,  and  beini^-  the  bishop,  l^ept  open  honse  to  all. 
He  lost  a  great  many  stock  through  the  Indian  raids. 
Was  always  prominent  in  church  and  public  affairs  and 
universally  respected.  On  February  17,  1857,  he  married 
Margaret,  daughter  of  Kobert  and  Elizabeth  East(>n, 
born  near  (Glasgow,  Scotland,  September  20,  1834.  They 
had  thirteen  children:  •  Charles,  Harriet,  Oyrena,  George, 
Margaret,  Xettie,  John  W.,  Wallace,  S])encer  (now  on  a 
mission  t(^  Indian  Territory),  liussell  and  Edward,  living; 
Brigham  and  Jane,  deceased. 

rn  OFFTTT,  JOHN  AV.,  city  watermaster,  son  of  Andre^v 
ill  J.  and  Margaret  Eastou,  was  born  in  Manti  Septem- 
'  y  ber  27,  18()<).  At  the  age  of  12  he  began  herding 
cattle  for  his  father  and  continued  till  at  19  he  went  to 
Silver  Beef,  Utah,  where  he  was  engaged  in  handling 
ores  for  two  years.  He  worked  in  Colorado  on  the  'Mid- 
land railway,  and  at  Bingham,  Utah,  handling  ore, 
finally  returning  to  Alanti.  His  father  died  June  5,  1892; 
since  then  he  has  worked  the  (dd  homestead  of  fifty  acres, 
northwest  of  the  city.  He  owns  his  residence  iu  the  city 
and  is  interested  in  stockraising,  being  a  member  of  the 
Manti  Stock  Company.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in 
Manti  December  12,  1889,  was  Eva,  daughter  of  Freder- 
ick W.  and  Cordelia  Cox.  She  was  born  in  this  city 
December  8,  1866.  They  have  three  children:  Margaret, 
born  :\rarch  12,  1891;  Lillis,  :Mav  6,  1893,  and  Clifton, 
June  10,  1896. 

rr\  rXK,  ERNEST,  farmer  and  member  of  the  (Jitj 
ill  Council,  son  of  Christian  and  Anna,  M.,  was  born 
*  I  iu  Alauti  Febmaiw  20,  1858.  The  family  are  among 
the  early  settlers  of  this  city.  When  Ernest  grew  up  to 
manhood  he  worked  on  the  railroads  and  in  mining 
<amps  for  some  time.  He  now  owns  seventy  acres  of  land 
and  is  engaged  in  farming.  He  has  always  taken  an 
active  part  in  church  matters  aud  has  served  as  first 
counsellor  in  the  Elders'  Quorum.  In  1890  he  was  elected 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  and  again  in  1897,  being  a 


162  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

stroug  ])emocrat  aud  representative  citizen.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City  October  26,  1882,  to  Petrena, 
daughter  of  Xels  P.  and  Elsie  C.  Domgaard,  born  in 
Manti  May  19,  1859.  They  have  had  nine  children: 
Ernest  E.,  Louis  C,  Leo  1).  and  Clara  M.,  living;  five  died 
in  infancy.  Her  parents  were  early  settlers  in  Manti, 
being  an  old  and  much  respected  family.  Father  served 
as  one  of  the  early  City  Councilors. 

pf\  rXK,  JOSEl'll  C.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
I  I  I  Christian  aud  Anna  ^L,  was  born  in  Manti  Janu- 
I  I  ary  30,  1855.  He  was  raised  here  and  brought  up 
to  farming  and  general  work,  Aftei*  securing  enough  to 
purchase  a  small  fann  he  engaged  in  farming  for  him- 
self and  now  has  115  acres  and  a  good  band  of  Hereford 
and  other  breeds  of  stock.  He  is  a  self-made  man,  honest 
and  energ(4ic,  aud  a.  good  citizen.  Was  married  in 
JA)gan  I'emple  November  14,  1881,  to  Elizabeth,  daugh- 
ter of  James  and  Catherine  Crawford,  born  in  Moroni 
June  11,  1863.  Thry  have  tlireo  chihlren:  Mary  J.,  James 
C.  and  La  Kue. 

fY\  UNK,  PETER,  farmer,  Manti,  son  of  Christian  I.  and 
/  I  I  Auna  M.  Muuk,  was  born  on  the  island  of  Born 
I  i  Holm,  Denmark,  September  21,  1844.  His  parents 
were  among  the  early  members  of  the  Mormon  church, 
and  emigrated  to  this  country  with  the  first  company  of 
Scandinavian  emigrants  in  1853.  They  located  in  Spring 
City,  this  county,  but  were  soon  compelled  to  leave  on 
account  of  the  Indians,  and  moved  to  Manti,  where  they 
are  still  living,  father  aged  76  aud  mother  75  years.  Mr. 
Muuk  made  a  trip  across  the  plains  in  1866  in  a  church 
train  for.  emigrants.  He  has  always  followed  the  occu- 
pation of  a  farmer,  and  now  has  a  good  farm  of  50  acres, 
and  a.  nice  house  in  town.  Mr.  Munk  is  one  of  the  relia- 
ble citizens  of  Manti,  and  was  elected  by  the  people  in 
the  fall  of  1895  to  represent  their  interests  in  the  City 
Council.  He  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store.  He 
was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  November  24,  1868,  to 
Miss  Eunice  A.,  daughter  of  James  P.  and  Eunice  (Rei- 
^ev)  Brown,  born  in  the  first  log  house  with  a  board  floor 


HOX.    JOHN    LOWRY. 
MANTl. 


AZARIAH    SMITH. 
MANTl. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  163^ 

erected  in  Manti,  March  13,  1851.  Their  children  are  as 
follows:  Eunice  M.,  born  October  8,  1809;  Lilly  M.,  De- 
cember 15,  1871;  Clara  M.,  September  4,  1873,  and  Wil- 
liam P.,  September  29,  1889.  Mrs.  Munk's  parents  came 
to  Manti  in  1819,  but  several  years  later  moved  to  south- 
ern Utah. 

k/eLSON,  ANDREW,  farmer,  son  of  Nelson  Anderson 
\\  and  Mariae  O.,  was  bora  in  Jydland,  Denmark, 
i  March  8, 1834.  He  joined  the  Mormon  Church  in  1851 
and  came  to  Manti  in  1853,  crossing  the  plains  with 
Capt.  Fosgren.  In  1865  he  returned  to  Denmark  on  a 
two  years'  mission.  Was  active  in  the  Indian  wars  and 
one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Spring  City,  leaving  on  ac- 
count of  the  Indians.  Served  as  Sheriff  for  two  years, 
City  Councillor  two  terms.  Justice  of  the  Peace  one  term 
and  is  Constable  and  keeper  of  the  city  estray  pound. 
He  owns  several  small  farms  and  two  fine  residences  in 
the  city,  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Union  Eoller  mill.  I& 
an  elder  in  the  Presbyterian  Church,  of  which  he  has 
been  a  member  for  several  years.  He  has  had  four  wives, 
thirteen  sons  and  five  daughters,  and  now  lives  with  his 
third  wife,  Sophia. 

First  wife  was  Mette  Nielsen.  She  had  five  chil- 
dren, Andi'ew,  Emma,  August,  Joseph  and  Christian. 
Second  wafe,  Christena  Jensen,  has  two  children,  Hyrum 
and  James.  Third  wife,  Sophia  Miller,  has  six  children, 
Sophus,  Maria,  Oscar,  Thorwald,  Guy  and  Myrtle. 
Fourth  wife,  Camilla  Miller,  has  five  children,  Frederick, 
Annie,  Erastus,  Clara  and  Franklin. 

KEELSON,  ANDRE\\'  C,  Superintendent  of  Schools  of 
1)1  Sanpete  county,  is  a  son  of  M.  P.  and  Margaret 
*  (Hansen)  Nelson,  born  in  Ephraim,  this  county, 
January  20,  1864.  His  mother  pulled  a  hand-cart  and 
walked  all  the  way  from  the  Missouri  river  to  Ephraim 
in  1858;  father  came  in  1860,  and  they  w^ere  married  in 
Ephraim.  When  Andrew  was  about  16,  the  family  moved 
to  Redmond,  Sevier  county,  where  the  father  died  in 
1891,  and  the  mother  still  resides.  Andrew  went  to  Colo- 
rado and  worked  on  the  railroad,  canal  and  in  the  mines 


164  HISTORY    01    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

iibout  three  years.  He  tlieii  attended  the  B.  Y.  Academy 
at  Provo  aud  fitted  himself  for  teaching.  He  taught 
school  five  winters  and  attended  the  academy  spring 
terms,  graduating  from  the  Xormal  dei)artment  in  1890. 
He  then  came  to  Manti,  had  charge  of  the  L.  D.  8.  Semi- 
nai-y  three  years,  and  taught  in  the  city  schools,  and  in 
the  fall  of  1895  was  elected  CoiTnty  Superintendent  of 
Schools.  Four  summers  he  has  attended  college,  and  is 
keejjing  al)r<'ast  of  the  finite  in  his  profession.  Mr.  Nel- 
son has  worked  hard  since  coming  to  Manti,  and  has  had 
the  satisfaction  of  seeing  the  schools  rapidly  improve, 
until  they  now,  under  his  abl<^  management,  compare 
favorably  with  the  best  in  the  State.  He  maiTied  in 
Kedujond,  August  5,  1885,  Amanda,  daughter  of  Andrew 
J.  aud  Andrear  Jensen,  born  in  Norway,  March  28,  18(54. 
Their  children  are  Andrew  C,  Chloe  A.,  Joseph  C,  Car- 
lyle  L.,  Arliu  (\  and  ]Marion  C 

jj  ELSON,  JAMES  P.,  was  born  in  Manti,  July  17,  1871. 
jM  He  is  a  son  of  Ole  and  Christina  Nelson,  whose 
I  sketch  appears  elsewhere.  He  was  raised  on'  a  farm 
and  received  a  good  common  school  education.  In  1889 
he  entered  the  postoltic^  as  assistant  to  his  brother,  O. 
O.  Nelson.  He  had  full  cliarge  of  the  office  and  was  al- 
ways couHeous  and  obliging,  giving  good  satisfaction  to 
the  people.  In  the  census  of  1895  he  was  statistician  in 
this  county;  was  elect<Hl  dty  Collecter  in  1893  and  City 
Recorder  in  the  fall  of  1895.  He  was  married  in  Manti 
October  22,  1896,  to  Clara,  daughter  of  Andrew  and 
Camilla  Nelson,  who  were  among  the  early  settlers  of 
Manti  and  still  reside  here. 

Kf  lEl.SEX,  FKITZ  E.,  (hM-eased,  son  of  Christian  and 
1)1  Annie  M.  Madsen,  w  as  bom  in  Denmark,  June  24, 
'  1838.  His  pai'ents  were  Mormons,  and  came  to 
Utah  on  September  29,  1853,  crossing  the  plains  in  an 
oxtraiu.  They  stopped  at  Spring  City  but  were  driven 
to  Manti  by  the  Indians,  and  located  here.  His  father 
M  as  a  miller  and  part  owner-  in  the  first  gTist  mill  in 
IManti.  He  was  a  faiiner  and  (mce  filled  the  office  of 
City  Treasurer.    During  the  Indian  wax's  he  was  wouml- 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  165 

id  by  being  shot  through  the  thigh,  in  an  engagement  in 
Salina  canyon,  April  12, 1865.  He  was  married  in  Manti, 
April  14,  1863,  to  Caroline  Domgaard,  daughter  of  Niels 
P.  and  and  Elsie  0.  Nielsen,  born  in  Hals,  Denmark, 
August  29,  1816.  They  had  ten  children:  Caroline  mar- 
ried Albert  Smith  and  had  three  children,  Albert  A., 
David  E.  and  Mai'^'!  E.;  Maiy  C,  wife  of  William  F. 
Braithwaite,  has  two  children,  Olive  N.  and  Francis; 
Annie  M.,  wife  of  Raymond  Buchanan,  has  four  children, 
Royal  R.,  Clyde  C,  Alphonzo  and  Pearl  E;  Alice  V., 
wife  of  TTlrich  Schiers,  has  tAvo  children,  Charles  U.  and 
Mary  A.;  Fritz  E.,  Ethel  E.,  Ida  M.,  Edwin  A.  and  Law- 
rence N.,  at  home;  Caroline  E.  and  Charles  C  deceased. 

Kf  lELSON,  JOHN  R.,  shoemaker,  son  of  Neils  and 
1 1  Karen,  was  born  in  Norway  March  23,  1854.  He 
I  served  an  apprenticeship  of  three  and  a  half  years 
and  learned  his  trade  in  Norway.  Joined  the  Mormon 
Church  in  1875  and  in  1880  came  to  Utah,  locating  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  where  he  remained  four  years.  In  1884 
he  came  to  jManti  aud  opened  a  shoe  sho})  at  No.  7  L^nion 
sti'eet,  Avliere  he  employs  two  men  at  the  bench  in  manu- 
facturing boots  and  shoes.  Also  cames  a  stock  of  boots 
and  shoes  of  about  .flOOO.  He  oavus  his  shop,  tAVO  stores 
next  of  it  aud  a  resideuce  in  the  city.  Is  quite  a  worker 
in  the  Monuon  Church.  AVas  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
September  16,  1880,  to  Jensina  M.  Jensen.  They  have 
seven  children:  Jovseph  G.,  Anna  M.,  Jensina  Martha, 
John  R.  N.,  Niels  J.  A.,  Karen  Otelie  E.  and  Otto  T.  ^V. 

kf  lELSON,  OLE,  farmer,  Avas  born  in  Denmark,  Octo- 
l>|  ber  3,  1824.  At  the  age  of  22  he  enlisted  in  the 
'  amiy  and  serv^ed  four  years  in  the  war  against 

Germany  and  Schleswig.  He  was  awarded  a  medal  by 
Frederick  VII.,  King  of  Denmark,  dated  1848-1850.  On 
October  3,  1857,  he  was  married  in  Copenhagen  to  Maria 
Peterson,  who  had  two  children^  Annie  and  Sophia,  and 
died  in  tliat  city.  He  came  to'  Utah  in  1863  and  located 
in  Manti  in  1864.  His  farm  consists  of  77  acres  and  he 
owns  a  home  in  the  city.  He  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  lost  one  yoke  of  cattle,  stolen  by  the  In- 


166  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

dians.  His  present  wife,  whom  lie  married  in  Salt  Lake 
€it.y,  August  29,  1863,  was  Stine  Peterson,  born  in  Den- 
mark, June  16,  1829.  They  have  four  children,  Maria, 
born  June  16,  1865;  Ole  0.,*^  August  29,  1867;  Charles  0., 
April  9,  1869,  and  James  P.,  July  17,  1871. 

OLSEX,  JA3fES,  deceased,  a  native  of  Denmark,  came 
to  Utah  in  the  early  days  and  located  in  Ephraim, 
from  which  he  was  called  to  help  settle  Circle  Val- 
ley. He  with  others  Avas  driven  out  in  1866,  and  located 
in  Manti.  He  died  in  Ephraim  in  1884.  Of  his  22  chil- 
dren 11  are  living.  They  are:  Peter,  David,  Hans,  Dan- 
iel, Louis,  Annie,  Diantha,  Elizabeth,  Mary  and  James 
K.  Louis  was  born  in  Epliraim  July  9,  1873,  and  has 
been  engaged  in  faimiug  and  sheeplierding.  He  was 
married  in  Manti,  September  1,  1897,  to  Johanna  M., 
adopted  daughter  of  P.  O.  Hansen,  born  in  Denmark, 
February  21,  1875. 

OLSTEN,  AN'ILLIAM  LE  KOY,  A.  M.,  M.  D.,  Manti, 
was  born  in  Biimingliam,  Eng.,  November  3,  1847. 
At  the  time  of  his  birth  his  mother  resided  with 
her  parents  on  a  visit  and  when  our  subject  was  six 
weeks  old  she  returned  to  Germany.  He  received  a  thor- 
ough academic  education  at  the  Royal  Gymnasium  of 
Berlin,  from  wh(nli  institution  he  received  the  Degree  of 
A.  M.  At  the  age  of  18  he  entered  upon  the  study  of 
medicine  and  surgery  at  the  universities  of  Bonn,  Heidel- 
berg, Leipzig,  Vienna  and  Berlin  and  received  the  Degree 
of  jMedicine  and  Surgery  in  1869. 

After  having  traveled  around  the  world  and  visiting 
the  principal  countries  of  Europe  he  returned  to  Ger- 
many, but  for  political  reasons  and  too  pronounced  so- 
cialistic Adews  he  was  denied  to  enter  the  German  army 
as  medical  officer  and  concluded  to  emigrate  to  the 
United  States  of  America.  In  the  year  of  1870  he  arrived 
at  Philadelphia  and  studied  medicine  and  surgeiy  under 
the  tutorship  of  its  eminent  surgeon,  Samuel  Gross,  in 
order  to  acquaint  himself  more  fully  with  the  American 
system  of  practicing  medicine.  In  1871  he  was  ap- 
pointed acting  assistant  surgeon  T^.  S.  A.  and  after  hav- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  167 

ing  served  in  that  capacity  at  vanous  western  military 
posts  he  resigned  in  1876  to  enter  into  civil  practice  in 
Oakland,  California,  removed  afterwards  to  Arizona  and 
later  to  White  Pine  county,  Nevada. 

In  the  fall  of  1878  he  came  to  Utah  and  settled  at 
liichmond,  Cache  County,  where  he  practiced  his  pro- 
fession for  about  four  jears,  moved  then  to  Provo,  Utaii 
county,  a.ud  in  1881  settled  in  Sanpete  county,  where 
at  present  he  enjoys  a  very  lucrative  and  extensive  prac 
tice.  For  eight  years  he  held  the  office  of  County  Physi- 
cian, and  is  the  pi^e^sent  incumbent  of  that  office.  The 
past  six  years  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  surgical 
staff  of  the  Eio  Grande  Western  Railway. 

For  two  years  he  held  the  office  of  County  Coroner  of 
Sanpete  county.  He  is  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  V.  W., 
of  which  lodge  he  is  medical  examiner,  and  is  also  medi- 
cal examiner  of  leading  Life  Insurance  Companies. 

He  was  married  at  the  Logan  Temple,  November  27, 
1884,  to  Miss  Lodicy  A,  Griffin,  daughter  of  Thomas  A. 
and  Amanda  Griffin  of  Richmond,  Cache  valley,  has  one 
daughter  Sidonia,  born  in  Ephraim,  this  county,  August 
22,  1886.  The  doctor  descends  fi'om  one  of  the  most 
aristocratic  and  influential  families  in  Prussia,  and  is 
the  only  member  which  ever  entered  civil  life,  all  of  his 
ancestors  having  been  in  the  militaiw  service.  He  is  a 
veteran  of  the  war  of  1866,  where  he  served  as  Lieuten'- 
ant  in  the  first  Royal  Dragoons  against  Austria,  and  her 
Southern  Confederates. 

Dr.  Olsten  has  associated  with  him  Dr.  H.  V.  Cassa- 
dy  and  the  professional  firm  of  Olsten  &  Cassady  enjoys 
a.  very  liigli  reputation  as  physicians  and  surgeons  in  San- 
pete county. 

PAKRY,  EDWARD  L.,  of  E.  L.  Parry  &  Sons,  masons 
and  monumental  stonecutters,  Manti,  was  born  in 
St.  George,  Denbigshire,  Wales,  August  25,  1818. 
He  learned  his  trade  under  his  father,  who  was  a  first- 
class  workman,  came  to  Utah  in  1853  by  ox  train;  in 
October  he  began  work  on  tlie  Salt  Lake  Temple,  helped 
put  in  the  big  treasure  box,  the  foundations  of  which  are 
laid  sixteen  feet  below  the  surface.     In  June,  1862,  he 


168  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

was  sent  to  St..  George,  where  he  built  the  St.  George 
hall,  courthouse  and  many  other  buildings;  was  master 
mason  on  the  St.  George  Tabernacle,  and  also  during 
the  entire  construction,  nearly  five  years,  on  the  beauti- 
ful Temple.  In  the  spring  of  1877  he  was  called  to  Manti 
and  installed  as  master  mason  on  its  magnificent  Temple 
and  spent  ten  years  in  that  work.  In  1888  the  present 
company  was  formed,  comprising  our  subject  and  three 
sons,  Edward  T.,  John  L.  and  Bernard.  They  do  a  lai'ge 
business  in  contracting  and  building  and  marble  cutting. 
Mr.  Parry  is  a  heavy  stockholder  in  the  Manti  Oo-oj)  and 
Manti  City  Savings  Bank.  He  manied  in  Wales  to  Eliza- 
beth Evans,  who  <li(Ml  in  Manti.  He  again  married  in 
Salt  Lake  l-^ebruary  11),  1857,  to  Ann,  daughter  of 
Thomas  and  Ann  (Williams)  Parry.  Their  children  are: 
Elizabeth,  Edward  T.,  IMary  E.,  John  L.,  Harriet,  Ber- 
nard and  Ennna.  E<lward  T.,  born  October  19,  1859, 
marrie<l  October  9,  1882,  to  Gharlotte  A.  Edmunds,  who 
is  a  native  of  this  county,  born  in  Wales,  this  county, 
August  17,  1802.  Tlieir  children  are:  Edwardena,  Ann, 
AViiiifred,  Gharles  and  Arline.  Edward  T.  is  a  prominent 
young  business  man,  is  Treasurer  of  INIanti  Gity,  one  of 
the  directors  of  the  INIanti  Go-oj),  stockholder  in  the  IManti 
City  Savings  Bank,  Gentral  Utah  \Vo(d  Gompany  and  the 
Wales  Go-op. 

PABSOXS,  AKTHl^B  H.,  fanner  and  woolgTOwer  of 
Manti,  is  a  son  of  James  and  JNIary  (Beeves)  Par- 
sons,boru  in  Keokuk,  la.,  September  2(1,  1859.  His 
parents  joined  the  Alormon  church  about  1850  in  Eng- 
land. His  father  was  born  in  Somersetshire,  England, 
and  was  a  brass  moulder  by  trade;  he  died  in  Hamilton, 
Hancock  Gounty,  111.,  July  25,  1871;  mother  now  living  in 
Manti.  In  18G6  the  family  came  to  this  countiy  and  set- 
tled in  Hamilton.  In  1876  Arthur  came  to  Manti  and 
remained  here  about  ten  months  and  then  rettirned  to 
Illinois.  In  October,  1880,  himself  and  mother  came  to 
Manti,  where  he  Avas  engaged  in  various  occupations 
until  he  accumulated  a  little  means  and  then  he  bought 
a  small  farm  near  town  and  also  embarked  in  the  sheep 
business.     Mr.  Parsons    being    naturally    a    progressive 


I 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  169 

iiiau,  bejiuu  to  iiiipi-ove  ou  the  uative  breed  of  skeeep.  He 
has  iiiipoi-teil  a  iiiiiubei'  of  hue  A'eriiiont  iiieriuos  aud  now 
has  3500  head  of  the  hiiest  sheej)  iu  Sanpete  County.  He 
lias  ei'eeted  in  the  northwestern  part  of  the  citj'  one  of 
the  finest  brick  residences  in  the  city,  with  barns  aud 
other  buildings  to  match.  He  is  junior  past  graud  of 
Temple  City  Lodge  No.  23,  I.  (').  O.  F.  ^h:  Parsons 
joined  the  Mormon  church  since  coming  to  Manti.  He 
stands  high  in  the  estimation  of  the  people  and  is  con- 
sidered an  honorable,  ui)right  citizen.  He  maiTied  in 
Salt  Lake  City  October  8,  1883,  Miss  Nellie,  daughter  of 
John  and  Ellen  Walker,  born  iu  New  Zealand,  Noyember 
5,  1864.  Their  children  are:  James  J.,  born  June  22, 
1884;  Arthur  H.,  June  13,  1886;  Lwnard  R.,  April  14, 
1889;  Lamonte  R.,  October  11,  1891,  died  April  2,  1892; 
Andrew  L.,  Jauuaiy  29,  1893,  Aldon  L.,  August  19,  1895, 
and  Nellie  ]\I. 

PATTEN,  HON.  JOHN,  farmer,  son  of  John  and  Han- 
nah, \yas  born  in  Green  county,  Indiana,  June  20, 
1825.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  Church 
among  the  earliest  members,  and  in  1833  remoyed  to 
Jackson  county,  Mo.  Thej  passed  through  the  persecu- 
tions! of  the  Monnons  and  went  to  Iowa,  where  John 
gj'ew  up  and  went  into  the  pine  woods  of  Wisconsin.  He 
came  to  Utah  in  1850  and  located  in  Mauti,  under  the 
quarry,  assisting  in  building  the  fort.  Took  part  in  the 
^A'alker  and  Black  Hawk  wars  and  has  always  been  an 
active  man.  Was  ai  representatiye  to  the  Territorial 
Legislature,  Sheriff  of  the  county  and  a  member  of  the 
<^'it\'  Council.  Married  in  Mauti  to  Candace,  daughter 
of  Albert  and  Esther  Smith.  She  died,  leaying  two  sons 
and  three  daughters.  Was  married  again  to  Emily,  a 
twister  of  the  first  wife.  She  had  three  sons  and  two 
daughters.  She  was  the  widow  of  C\'reiius  H.  Taylor,  by 
whom  she  had  three  sons  and  two  daughters. 

PEACOCK,  HON.  GEOEGE,  deceased,  son  of  George 
and  Mary  Noddings,  was  born  in  England  July  30, 
1822.  The  family  removed  to  Canada,  where  father 
died  in  1831.     ^Mother  married  John  Clark,  and  in  1837, 


170  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

the  family  removed  to  the  United  States,  locating  in 
Missouri.  The  next  year  they  went  to  Iowa,  where 
George,  afterward  known  as  "Judge  Peacock,"  married 
Sarah  Lowry  April  4,  18-40.  In  July  of  that  year  he  was 
baptized  in  the  Mormon  Church  and  went  to  Nauvoo, 
Illinois,  where  he  volunteered  as  a  guard  to  the  prophet 
Joseph  Smith.  In  1846  he  left  with  the  Saints  and  as- 
sisted in  building  the  tirst  ferryboat  to  cross  the  Missouri 
river  at  Council  Bluffs.  He  came  to  Utah  in  1850  and 
located  at  Manti.  He  served  as  Probate  Judge  and  a 
member  of  the  Territorial  Legislature.  Was  the  first 
postmaster  in  Manti  and  a  I'epi^sentative  citizen  in  his 
day.  He  performed  a  mission  to  England  and  was  adju- 
tant of  the  Sanpete  military'  district  during  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  He  had  three  wives:  Sarah,  Mary  and 
Sarah  Bell,  and  left  twenty-three  children,  who  are  well 
and  favorably  known  throughout  Utah. 


PETEBSON,  ANDEEW,  temple  worker,  son  of  Peter 
and  Anna  Anderson,  was  born  in  Horsted,  Thisted, 
Denmark,  ^lay  1,  1850.  H(^  was  raised  on  a  farm, 
joined  the  Monnon  Churcli  in  1870  and  spent  two  years 
as  a  traveling  elder.  In  1873  he  came  to  Utah,  residing 
four  years  in  Salt  Lake  City,  and  then  removed  to  Manti. 
He  worked  eight  years  in  quanting  rock  and  helping  to 
build  th(-  Tem])h',  then  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to 
the  Southern  States,  where  he  had  charge  of  the  West 
Tennessee  conference  for  six  months.  On  his  return  he 
entered  the  Temple  as  a  worker  and  has  been  engaged 
there  since  then,  with  perfect  satisfaction  to  all  con- 
cerned. He  is  also  engaged  in  the  poultiy  business  and 
is  a  much  respected  citizen,  being  an  earnest  worker  in 
churcli  and  business  affairs.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
Cit3'  September  29,  1873,  to  Christina  Xeilsen,  born  April 
14,  1852.  They  have  had  eight  cliildren:  Annie,  Andrew, 
one  of  the  volunteers  in  the  United  States  army  in  war 
with  Spain;  Christina,  William  H.,  Emeline  Viola,  liv- 
ing; Bichard,  Christian  and  Albert,  deceased. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  171 

PETERSEN,  XIELS  E.,  titliing  office  clerk,  son  of  Ras- 
mus and  Ane  Kirstine,  was  born  in  Denmark,  June 
2,  1858.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and 
emigrated  to  Utah,  he  coming  to  Manti  in  1880.  In  1881 
he  was  api)ointed  assistant  tithing  clerk,  and  in  1887  was 
promoted  to  the  position  of  clerk.  He  left  the  office  in 
1890  in  the  interest  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.,  returning  in 
1893,  where  he  still  works.  He  is  a  director  and  secre- 
taiy  in  the  Manti  Co-op.  Sheep-Herding  and  Wool-Grow- 
ing Institution,  treasurer  of  the  Manti  Co-op.  Mercantile 
Institution,  and  a  stockholder  in  the  Central  Utah  Wool 
Company.  His  wife  was  Jensine  C.  Hansen,  daughter  of 
Hans  and  Ane  M.,  a  native  of  Bornholm,  Denmark,  born, 
August  5,  1850.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
October  21,  1880,  and  have  five  children,  Niels  C,  bom 
December  29,  1881;  Kirstine  M.,  January  4,  1885;  Jessie 
C,  December  9,  1887;  Erastus,  May  2,  1890,  and  Grace, 
March  7,  1892. 

PETERSON,  O.  C,  farmer,  son  of  Ole  and  Anna,  was 
bom  on  the  island  of  Falster,  Denmark,  Decem- 
ber 25,  1840.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the 
Mormon  Church  in  1868  and  in  1870  came  to  Utah,  lo- 
cating in  Manti.  He  bought  2^  acres  of  land  and  added 
to  it  until  he  now  owns  a  nice  far-m  of  35  acres.  He 
sometimes  works  in  winters  making  baskets.  W^as  mar- 
ried in  Manti  March  2,  1873,  to  Karen,  daughter  of  Jacob 
and  Mary  Jacobsen,  bom  in  Denmark,  February  2,  1840. 
They  have  three  children:  Oliver  O.,  Frederick  and 
Mary  A. 

PROYSTGAARD,  NIELS  J.,  jeweler  and  sewing  ma- 
chine dealer,  son  of  Jens  S.  and  Karen  Provstgaard, 
was  born  in  Provstgaard  Jyland,  Denmark,  April 
25,  1849,  where  he  learned  the  shoemaker  trade,  and  fol- 
lowed the  business.  In  1871  he  came  to  the  United 
States  and  located  the  following  spring  in  Fountain 
Green,  where  he  engaged  in  the  shoe  business.  About 
1877  he  entered  the  Fountain  Green  Co-op.  store,  and 
after  two  years  as  a  clerk  he  became  manager,  which 


172  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

position  he  held  for  two  and  one-half  years.  He  came 
to  Manti  in  1884  as  traveling  salesman  for  the  Singer 
Sewing  Machine  Company,  working  Sanpete,  Emery, 
Sevier  and  Piute  counties.  In  1894  he  opened  a  store 
where  he  carries  a  stock  of  groceries,  hats,  caps  and  no- 
tions, and  does  general  watch  and  clock  repairing.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  and  the  Mormon  church, 
and  a  conservative  business  man.  He  was  married  in 
Denmark,  October  30,  1871,  to  Johanne  Nielson,  who  died 
in  this  city  December  3,  1887.  He  was  married  in  Manti 
December  28,  1888,  to  ]\Iette  Maria  C,  daughter  of  Jorgen 
and  Anna  M.  Benson.  Thev  have  two  children,  Alvira, 
bom  July  18,  1891,  and  Niels  L.,  June  25,  1894. 

I^EID,  EDWARD,  tailor,  son  of  John  and  Fanny,  was 
IT  born  in  Drum  bo.  County  Down,  Ireland,  of  Scotch 
V  ancestry,  February  15,  1828.  He  seiwed  six  yeai*s 
as  an  apprentice  and  learned  the  trade  of  tailoring  and 
has  followed  the  business  most  of  his  life.  In  1847  he 
joined  the  Mormon  Church  in  Liverpool  and  for  seven 
years  was  a  traveling  elder.  He  pi'esided  over  the  Kil- 
marnock, Scotland,  conference  in  185G;  the  Dundee, 
Scotland,  (•(•nfereiice  in  1S57  and  1858;  the  Herefordshire, 
Scotland,  conferem-e  in  1859,  and  the  Nottingham,  Eng- 
land, confeience  in  18()0  and  1801.  In  18G1  he  came  to 
Utah  and  located  in  Payson,  where  he  resided  twenty 
j^ears.  Was  tailor  in  the  Z.  C.  M.  I.,  Salt  Lake  City,  three 
years.  Served  as  a  Lieutenant  in  the  Black  Hawk  war. 
In  1880  he  removed  to  Dover,  taking  up  160  acres  of  land, 
built  a  home  and  tried  farming,  but  had  to  leave  on  ac- 
count of  saleratus  in  the  soil.  Came  to  Manti  in  1888  and 
opened  a  tailor  shop  and  has  worked  up  a  nice  trade.  Is 
a  first-class  cutter  and  fitter  and  practical  tailor.  Was 
married  in  Belfast,  Ireland,  August  3,  1853,  to  Sarah, 
daughter  of  Hugh  and  Catherine  Shields,  born  in  the 
county  of  Down  July  12,  1828.  They  had  seven  children : 
Hugh,  John  S.  and  Edward,  living  in  Dover;  Fannie  M., 
wife  of  George  E.  Judd,  Grantsville;  and  Agnes  J.,  wife 
of  Prof.  John  M.  Mills,  L.  D.  S.  College,  Salt  Lake  City, 
living;  Annie  and  Sarah,  deceased.  His  wife  died  Au- 
gust 1,  1889.     Married  again  July  27,  1897,     to     Nancy 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  173^ 

Jones,  nee  Billings,  daughter  of  George  P.  and  Jerusha 
Sliomaker  Billings,  bom  in  Manti. 

Ji^EID,  JOIIX  P.,  fai-nier,  son  of  Jolm  and  Fannie 
IT  White,  was  born  in  the  county  of  Down,  Ireland, 
V  February  25,  1825.  He  learned  to  be  a  gardener 
and  followed  that  occupation  for  several  years.  At  the 
age  of  26  he  became  a  polisher  of  pianos  and  fine  furni- 
ture. In  1847  he  joined  the  Mormon  church  at  Belfast, 
and  for  nine  years  the  Mormon  meetings  were  held  in 
his  house.  He  came  to  Utah  in  1871  and  quarried  rock 
for  his  house,  the  family  coming  in  1872,  when  he  had 
built  a  place.  He  took  up  ICO  acres  of  land  and  now  owns 
sixty  acres.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  part  in 
church  matters,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Elders'  Quorum, 
having  seiTed  two  years  as  president  and  eleven  years 
as  first  counsellor  to  the  president.  Was  maiTied  in  Ire- 
land October  10,  1814,  to  Margaret,  daughter  of  Edward 
and  Mary  Kirkwood,  born  in  Ireland  March  14,  1826. 
They  had  thirteen  children:  Edward,  Will  K.,  John  K., 
Elizabeth,  Alexander,  Agnes,  Lucy  S.,  Eobert  and  Sarah, 
living;  Thomas,  Elizabeth  and  two  infants,  deceased.  He 
has  seventy  grandchildren  and  four  great  grandchildren. 

r)EID,  WILLIAM  A.,  blacksmith,  son  of  George  B.  and 
|T  Margaret  Gardner,  was  born  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
^  June  13,  1853.  His  father  was  a  stonemason,  com- 
ing to  Utah  in  1849  with  an  ox-train.  About  1857  the 
family  removed  to  Nephi,  where  the  father  died  in  Feb- 
ruar\',  1892 ;  the  mother  died  there  August  25,  1877.  Wil- 
liam learned  the  blacksmith  trade,  and,  beginning  in 
1877,  has  built  up  a  successful  business.  In  September, 
1892,  he  came  to  Manti  and  built  his  present  shop,  where 
he  does  general  blacksmithing,  horse  shoeing  and  re- 
X)airing  of  machinery.  He  owns  a  fine  residence  and  is  a 
stockholder  in  the  Messenger.  His  first  wife  was  Mary 
A.  Carter.  They  were  married  in  Nephi,  March  18,  1878. 
She  died  in  Nephi,  December  22,  1888,  leaving  three  chil- 
dren, William  G.,  John  C.  and  Margaret  A.  He  mar- 
ried in  Manti,  July  2,  1890,  Laura  A.,  daughter  of  Joseph 
and  Laura  A.  Tuttle.  They  have  four  children.  Pearl, 
Joseph  H.,  Grace  and  Frank. 


174  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

QEID,  WILLIAM  F.,   farmer,   son  of  William  T.  and 
IT         Jane  McEwan  Reicl,  was  born  in  Payson,  Utah, 

V  April  30,  1805.  AVlien  a  small  boy  his  family  re- 
moved to  this  city,  where  he  was  educated  and  trained 
up  to  farm  work.  He  owns  about  sixty  acres  of  good 
land,  and  for  the  last  few  j'ears  has  been  interested  in 
stockraising.  In  1893  he  built  a  fine  residence  on  his 
city  property  east  of  the  business  center.  He  is  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Manti  Co-op  store  and  was  for  several  years 
Deputy  County  Clerk  and  Recorder.  His  wife,  whom  he 
married  in  this  city  a  few  years  ago,  was  Diantha  Lowiy, 
daughter  of  John  jiud  Mary  Lowiw. 

r)l<:il),  HON.  WILLIAM  K.,  of  the  law  fi™  of  lleid  & 
IT     Cherry,  ^lanti,  was  born  in  Belfast,  Ireland,  Octo- 

V  ber  21,  1848;  son  of  John  I*,  and  Margaret  (Kirk- 
wood)  l\eid,  now  residents  of  Alanti.  His  parents  joined 
the  Mormon  church  about  1845  and  the  father  was  presi- 
dent of  the  Belfast  Branch  for  a  number  of  years.  Our 
subject  kvirii(>(l  the  trade  of  Fn^icli  jtolislier  of  his  father 
and  after  he  became  of  age  folhtwcd  it,  polishing  furni- 
ture and  pianos  in  Belfast,  (llasgow  and  Liverpool.  His 
father  canu»  to  I"^tali  in  1871  and  was  followed  the  next 
year  by  the  family,  the  mother  and  AMlliam  K.,  Mar- 
garet, Ak^xander,  Agnes,  Lucy,  Robert  and  Sarah.  Wil- 
liam K.  after  his  arrival  here  taught  school  and  studied 
law  and  was  admitted  to  practice  in  the  Supreme  Court 
of  Utah  June  22,  1883.  He  opened  an  office  in  Manti  and 
soon  secui"e(l  a  large  clientele.  He  was  elected  to  the 
office  of  Prosecuting  Attorney  in  1883  and  re-elected  in 
1884,  1886,  1888  and  again  in'  1896,  being-  the  present  in- 
cumbent. He  was  elected  Superintendent  of  Schools  in 
1883-85  and  1887.  In  1889  he  was  elected  a  member  of 
the  Territorial  Legislature  and  during  Cleveland's  sec- 
ond administration  he  was  appointed  Probate  Judge  of 
the  county.  He  is  at  present  City  Attorney  for  Manti, 
Ephraim,  Gunnison,  Spring  City  and  Fairview  of  this 
county  and  Salina  of  Sevier  county.  Mr.  Reid  is  a  strong 
silver  Democrat  and  is  a  charter  member  of  Manti  Lodge 
No.  23,  A.  O.  I'.  W.  In  August,  1897,  Mr.  Reid  took  into 
partnership  Avith  him  James  AY.  Cherry,  a  bright,  ener- 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  175 

getif  and  capnble  youuii  lawyer,  a  sou  of  Judge  A.  X. 
CberiT  of  ir^alt  Lake. 

Mr.  IJeid  married  iu  Salt  Lake  City  April  24,  1879, 
Miss  Jaue  Leathaui,  daughter  of  Kobert  aud  Jaue  S.,  of 
Wellsville,  Cache  Couuty,  Utah.  Their  childreu,  boru  in 
Mauti,  are  as  follows:  Maggie  MaA%  bom  March  31, 
1880;  Williaui,  boru  May  29,  1882,  died  Sej^tember  3, 
1883;  Jeuuie  S.,  boru  November  3,  1883;  Kuby,  bora 
Octobei-  27,  1885;  Ixobert  R.,  boru  September  4,  1887; 
Georgie,  born  April  8,  1889;  Vida,  boru  Jauuary  23,  1892; 
Kathleeu,  boru  March  24,  1894;  Phyllis,  boru"  July  3, 
1896. 

Mr.  l\eid  is  local  attorney  for  the  l\io  Graude  West- 
ern railroad  and  the  Mauti  Co-op.  Is  a  good  judge  of  law 
aud  well  read  iu  alj  its  intricacies;  is  much  esteemed  by 
his  constituents  aud  giyes  promise  of  beiug  one  of  Utah's 
ablest  practitioners  at  the  bar. 


r>EI]),  BISHOP  WILLIAM  TAYLOK,  of  Scotch  de- 
IT  scent,  was  boru  on  the  21st  of  July,  1830,  in  Drumbo, 
^  County  Down,  Ireland.  His  father,  John,  was  a  gard- 
ener aud  William  was  trained  to  the  same  occui^ation. 
He  married,  December  3,  1848,  in  Edinburgh,  Scotland, 
Miss  Jane  McEwau.  She  was  born  July  3,  1833,  iu  Edin- 
burgh. Of  their  childreu  bom  there  three  are  liyiug, 
viz.,  John,  Jane  aud  Henry  McEwan,  aud  three,  viz., 
Eliza,  AVilliam  F.  and  Edward  E.,  boru  after  their  arrival 
iu  Utah. 

Bishop  Reid  joined  the  Monnon  church  iu  Belfast, 
Ireland,  January  9,  1848,  and  was  an  early  earnest 
worker,  and  presided  over  the  Edinburgh  conference  of 
said  church  part  of  1861  and  1862.  Emigrated  to  Utah 
\n  1862,  and  drove  from  Florence,  on  the  Missouri  river, 
yitli  an  ox  team  with  Capt.  John  R.  ^Murdoch,  of  Beaver, 
iu  a  church  train,  aud  located  at  Provo.  He  taught  school 
there  in  the  Fourth  Ward  that  winter,  aud  then  turned 
his  attention  to  farming  for  a  short  time,  thence  to 
SpriugTille,  where  he  taught  one  season,  aud  from  there 
to  Payson  and  Spring  Lake  Villa,  where  he  was  farming 
and  teaching  for  two  years,  and  from  there  to  Richfield. 


176  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

He  held  a  commission  as  Major  in  the  Black  Hawk  war 
in  the  Sevier  County  militia.  In  November,  1867,  he  re- 
moved to  Manti  and  was  appointed  to  the  offices  of 
County  Clerk  and  Eecorder  and  County  Superintendent 
of  Schools,  which  positions  he  held  for  sixteen  years  to 
the  entire  satisfaction  of  the  people.  In  1877  was  ap- 
pointed Bishop  of  the  North  Ward,  Manti,  and  is  the 
present  incumbent.  Is  president  of  the  Manti  Co-opera- 
tive Mercantile  Institution  since  1876  and  Land  Attorney 
since  1883. 

Bishop  Eeid  has  been  an  active,  hard  worker;  is  a 
man  of  large  experience  unusual  sound  judgment,  thor- 
ough in  all  business  arrangements,  keen,  energetic  and 
mde  awake  to  the  interests  of  the  people  over  whom  he 
presides  and  in  wliose  hearth  he  lives. 

Being  true  to  his  earnest  religious  convictions,  he 
married  November  23,  1869,  Mary  Adelaide  M.  Cox,  of 
Manti,  and  his  had  by  her  four  children,  viz.:  Clare  W., 
Edgar  E.,  Mary  A.  and  Alice. 

r)ICHEY,  WILLIAM  B.,  of  Manti,  son  of  William  B. 
IT  and  Margaret  A.  (Adair),  born    in    Knox,  Yuba 

V  (^ounty.  Miss.,  May  17,  1840.  His  father  was  a 
planter  but  not  a  believer  in  slavery.  Fle  joined  the 
Mormon  church  and  moxed  to  Nauvoo  in  1816.  He  was 
engaged  in  missionary  work  many  years  in  Mississippi 
and  to  the  Cherokee  Nation  in  Florida,  learned  their 
language,  married  Nancy  Bidge,  the  chief's  daughter, 
and  became  a  member  of  the  nation.  About  a  year  later 
Ms  wife  died  and  he  returned  to  Mississipjii  and  married 
the  mother  of  our  subject.  The  family  came  to  L^tah  in 
1848  and  in  the  fall  of  1849  they  came  Avith  the  first  com- 
pany to  Manti  and  passed  through  all  the  hardships  and 
privations  of  those  early  days.  The  mother  died  in  Manti 
in  1852  and  the  father  in  1878  in  Parowan.  When  Wil- 
liam B.  grew  up  he  engaged  in  freighting  to  the  mining 
camps  in  Nevada  fifteen  years.  After  the  railroads  were 
built  he  engaged  in  fanning  and  now  has  a  nice  farm, 
also  a  comfortable  stone  residence,  one  of  the  first  built 
after  moving  out  of  the  fort.  In  both  the  Indian  wars 
he  took  his  part.     In  1862  he  went  to  California,  and  in 


L 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  177 

the  employ  of  the  Government  shipped  on  board  the 
Senator  in  (Iiar«>e  of  200  mules.  He  started  in  the 
fcprinj;-  of  1803  with  tlie  California  volunteers  for  Texas, 
but  his  sympathies  being  with  the  South,  he  was  dis- 
charged at  Fort  Yuma  and  returned  to  Utah.  He  mar- 
ried August  20,  1808,  Johanne,  daughter  of  Rasmus  and 
Magdalene  Hougaard.  Their  children  are  Johanne  J., 
Sarah  B.,  Julia  D.,  Xellie  L.,  Jenny  L.,  AVillina,  ^Villianl, 
John  B.,  Benjamin  and  Margaret  A.,  Mary  M.  and  Emily 
deceased.  Mr.  Eicliey  is  a  highly  respected  citizen,  Dem- 
ocrat, member  of  Board  of  Snpeiwisors  and  county  jailer. 


[RIDDLE,  ISAAC,  woolgrower,  son  of  John  and  Eliza- 
|T  beth  SteAvard,  was  born  in  Boone  County,  Kentucky, 
V  March  22,  1830.  His  father  Avas  a  county  physician 
and  for  many  years  was  a  Baptist  minister.  The  family 
removed  to  West  Tennessee  when  Isaac  was  a  small  boy, 
remained  there  for  three  years,  then  went  to  Hickman 
county,  Kentucky,  where  his  father  had  an  extensive 
medical  i)ractice.  His  father  joined  the  Mormon  church 
in  1813  and  in  the  spring  of  181-1  the  family  moved  to 
Xauvoo,  Illinois,  and  were  there  when  the  prophet  was 
killed.  In  August,  1841,  the  family  removed  to  Iowa  and 
spent  two  and  a  half  years  among  the  Indians  in  South 
Dakota,  finally  removing  to  Omaha,  from  which  point 
they  came  West  with  Brigham  Young's  compny.  They 
stopped  at  Pawnee  for  a  time,  then  at  Winter  Quarters, 
and  in  1847  returned  to  northwestern  Missouri,  remain- 
ing there  three  years.  The  father  went  to  Kentucky  on 
a  two  years'  mission,  leaving  Isaac  to  take  care  of 
mother  and  seven  children.  He  more  than  doubled  the 
family  possessions  while  his  father  was  absent,  and  in 
the  spring  of  1850  they  were  ready  to  start  for  Utah  with 
four  yoke  of  oxen  and  two  wagons.  They  reached  Utah 
in  October,  1850,  and  located  in  North  Ogdeu. 

Isaac  was  maiTied  in  North  Ogden  ]March  6,  1853,  to 
Mary  A.,  daughter  of  Frederick  and  Julia.  A.  Levie.  They 
had  six  children:  Isaac  J.,  a  business  man  in  Escalante, 
Garfield  county,  and  Joselina  M.,  residing  near  Pan- 
guitch  and  engaged  in  farming  and  stockraising,  are  the 


178  HISTOKY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

two  living  cues.  His  wife  died  in  Beaver,  Utah,  March  4, 
1874^.  In  the  spring  of  1854  he  was  called  on  an  Indian 
mission  and  spent  ten  years  in  southern  Utah,  Arizona, 
Nevada  and  Southern  California.  He  had  many  exciting 
experiences  and  naiTow  escapes  from  Indians  and  star- 
vation. He  was  with  the  company  of  twenty-two  of 
which  Jacob  Hamblin  was  president  and  often  had  to 
kill  an  old  Avorn  out  horse  for  food.  One  of  the  party, 
George  A.  Smith,  Jr.,  was  killed.  After  the  missionary 
labors  were  completed  he  removed  to  Beaver  county  and 
engaged  in  farming  and  stockraising  and  was  very  suc- 
cessful in  accumulating  at  least  $50,000  in  stock  and  mill 
property  in  fifteen  years'  work.  He  built  a  grist  mill  at 
Kanosh,  one  in  Sevier  county  and  a  third  one  at  Loa, 
Wayne  county.  He  joined  with  others  and  bought  a 
large  roller  mill  at  Elsinore  and  one  at  Springville,  in 
Utah  county,  which  he  now  owns. 

His  second  wife  was  Maiy  R.  James,  a  widow.  She 
had  seven  children:  Maiy,  wife  of  William  Fothering- 
ham,  Jr.,  fanner  and  stockraiser  of  Garfield  county; 
Elizabeth  M.,  wife  of  Joseph  Betterson,  farmer  and  stock- 
raiser,  of  Garfield  county;  Francina,  wife  of  M.  M.  Ste- 
vens, farmer,  in  Iowa  county,  Iowa;  Thomas,  farmer  and 
stockraiser,  of  Garfield  county,  and  Minerva,  wife  of 
John  Knowles,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  of  Garfield 
county,  are  living.  His  third  wife  was  Mary  A.,  daugh- 
ter of  Eobert  and  Maiy  A.  Knell.  She  has  had  seven 
children,  five  of  whom  are  living:  Lydia  A.,  wife  of  An- 
drew N.  Holdaway,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  residing  near 
Provo;  Lilly,  wife  of  Wari'eu  Holdaway,  farmer  and 
stockraiser,  near  Provo;  Wallace  M.,  farmer  and  stock- 
raiser in  Garfield  county;  Charles  E.,  farmer  and  stock- 
raiser, in  Garfield  county,  and  John,  at  home.  The 
fourth  wife  Avas  Maiw  C.  Turnbough.  Mr.  Kiddle  re- 
sided three  years  in  Provo,  where  he  went  to  educate  his 
children,  and  while  there,  served  a  time  for  having  a  plu- 
rality of  wives. 

in  the  fall  of  1890  he  came  to  Manti  to  work  in  the 
Temple,  and  has  been  an  earnest  man  in  the  cause,  ex- 
pending no  less  than  |15,000  in  prosecuting  his  labors. 
He  has  erected  fine  dwellings  in  Manti  and  is  an  ener- 


p.    p.    DYRENG, 

.MAX 'I  I. 


M.    W(   RKS. 
MA  XT  I. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  179 

getic,  hard-working  and  most  representative  citizen. 
His  many  interests  extend  in  all  parts  of  the  State  and 
he  may  always  be  found  actively  engaged  in  his  work 
and  conscientiously  performing  his  duties  in  every  field. 


r)OSENKKANTZ,  NEILS,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son 
IT  of  Peter  and  Sophia,  was  born  in  Denmark  De^em- 
V  ber  5, 1833.  He  was  a  sailor  for  a  few  years,  a  farm 
overseer  for  several  years  and  foreman  in  loading  and 
unloading  vessels  for  a  steamship  company  six  years  at 
Aarhus.  Joined  the  Moiinon  Church  in  1863  and  in  1872 
came  to  Utah,  locating  in  Manti.  He  brought  a  family 
of  eight,  costing  flOOO  for  transportation,  and  had  but 
75  cents  on  his  arrival.  Worked  at  anything  he  could 
get  to  do  and  linallj^  bought  ten  acres  and  added  to  it 
until  he  now  owns  a  nice  farm  of  thirty-five  acres.  Was 
engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  two  years,  then  pur- 
chased sheep,  now  having  2000  head.  Was  married  in 
Aarhus  to  Christina  Olseu.  She  died  there  in  1864,  leav- 
ing three  children:  Sophia  (deceased),  Ole  and  Christian. 
Man-ied  again  in  1866  to  Annie  K.  Sorenson.  She  has 
six  living  children:  Christina,  Neils,  Hans,  Petrea,  Peter 
and  Anna  M. 

5CHAUGAAED,  MKS.  I.  M.,  dealer  in  groceries  and 
notions  and  owner  of  restaurant  and  ice  cream 
•parlor,  a  native  of  Noi'^ay,  was  born  December 
16,  1847.  She  was  raised  in  the  old  country  and  joined 
the  Mormon  Church  there.  In  1884  she  came  to  Utah, 
locating  in  Salt  Lake  City.  She  was  married  in  the  Logan 
Temple  March  18,  1886,  to  N.  C.  Schaugaard,  a  farmer 
and  carpenter.  In  August,  1886,  she  came  to  Manti  and 
worked  in  the  Temple,  being  the  first  woman  worker. 
She  soon  opened  a  small  store  and  has  been  doing  a  good 
business.  Being  left  with  nothing,  she  has  by  energy  and 
perseverance  worked  up  a  good  trade  and  purchased  the 
building  in  which  she  lives  and  does  business.  She  is  an 
honest  and  industrious  w^oman  and  deserving  of  all  the 
patronage  the  people  can  bestow.  Her  only  son  is  Joseph 
C,  born  May  8,  1887. 


180  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

5  HAND,  DAVID,  fanner  and  woolgix)wer,  son  of  Da- 
vid and  Catherine  Clark,  was  born  in  Pifeshire, 
Scotland,  May  IS,  1844.  He  joined  the  Mormon 
Church  in  1861  and  in  1863  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the 
plains  in  an  oxtrain,  under  Capt.  Haight.  He  engaged  in 
farming  for  a  time  and  spent  four  years  as  a  contractor 
in  Little  Cottonwood  canyon,  deTcloping  mining  claims. 
I'or  twentj^  years  he  was  engaged  in  freighting  produce 
to  Salt  Lake  City  and  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Ne- 
vada. In  the  spring  of  1886  he  went  on  a  mission  to 
Indian  Territory,  and  labored  18  months  among  the 
various  tribes.  He  now  owns  a  fine  farm  of  100  acres. 
In  1889  he  engaged  in  woolgrowing  and  now  has  about 
10,000  sheep,  some  of  which  he  has  on  shares.  He  has  a 
liice  home  in  the  city,  and  is  a  self-made  man  and  repre- 
sentative citizen.  He  took  an  actiAe  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  standing  guard  and  doing  his  share.  Was 
married  in  Salt  I-ake  City,  October  4,  1866,  to  Bridget, 
ditughter  of  John  and  Ann  Weir  Hoggan,  born  in  Fife- 
shire,  Scotland,  January  31,  1846.  They  have  had  eleven 
children.  David  F.,  Kate,  John  W.  Marian,  Charles  S., 
^Maggie,  Jessie  L.  and  Robert  C,  living;  Annie,  Jennie, 
and  Leslie  C,  deceased.  Mrs.  Shand  came  to  this  country 
iu  1866,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Dan  Thompson's 
oxtrain. 

5H0MAKER,  HON.  EZRA,  president  of  the  Central 
Utah  Wool  Company  of  Manti,  is  a  native  of  Adams 
Couuty,  Illinois,  where  he  was  born  March  20,  1843. 
He  is  a  son  of  Jezreel,  who  was  a  farmer  and  stockraiser 
and  a  native  of  Pendleton  County,  Kentucky,  born  Octo- 
ber 29,  1796.  His  father  was  born  in  the  same  county, 
and  his  father,  Ezra's  great  grandfather,  Avas  a 
native  of  PennsylA'ania.  In  1847  his  parents  emigrated 
to  Utah  and  spent  the  winter  in  Salt  Lake  City,  and  in 
the  spring  of  1848  they  moved  to  Bountiful,  Davis  Coun- 
ty, his  father  and  Perigrene  Sessions  being  the  first  two 
men  to  settle  and  locate  that  place,  which  long  Avent  by 
the  name  of  Sessions.  In  the  fall  of  1849  the  family  moved 
to  Mauti,  arriving  here  on  the  19th  of  November,  when 
Ihey  went  into  camp  Avitli  others  of    the    company    and 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  181 

located  themselves  for  the  winter  on  the  south  side  and 
at  the  foot  of  Quany  hill,  where  the  Temple  now  stands. 
They  engaged  in  farming,  stockraising,  etc.  His  father 
was  a  prominent  man  in  the  early  settlement  of  the  place 
and  was  a  member  of  the  first  High  Council — chosen  to 
that  position  May  1, 1851.  He  died  in  Manti  May  31,  1879. 
Ezra's  mother,  whose  maiden  name  was  Nancy 
Golden,  was  a  native  of  the  same  place  as  was  her  hus- 
band. She  was  born  April  22,  1808,  and  shared  all  the 
arduous  labors  and  privations  with  him,  and  died  in 
Manti  May  23,  1870.  Ezra  was  brought  up  to  the  farm- 
ing industiw  and  engaged  in  stock  and  sheepraising ;  ha» 
a  valuable  farm  of  about  sixty  acres  near  Manti.  In  1891, 
when  the  wool  company  was  organized,  he  became  a 
director  and  was  vice-president  two  years,  and  in  1894 
was  elected  its  president.  This  company  does  an  annual 
business  of  about  |250,000  in  buying  and  shipping  wool, 
and  in  addition  handle  wagons,  agricultural  implements, 
etc.  He  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Mormon  church, 
member  of  the  High  Council  ten  years;  was  a  member 
of  the  City  Council  terms  of  1875,  '77,  '79  and  '85;  was 
Mayor  1891-2,  and  again  in  the  Council  in  1893.  His  re- 
peated elections  showed  the  esteem  and  confidence  in 
which  he  was  held  by  his  constituents.  He  married  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  while  a  resident  of  Manti,  December  1, 
1866,  Miss  Abigail  Tuttle,  daughter  of  Azariah,  born 
October  13,  1818,  in  Pottawattamie,  Iowa.  They  had 
seven  children,  two  living,  viz.:  Leonard  A.  and  Azariah 
O.,  associated  in  business  together  in  sheep  and  cattle 
industry  in  Alberta,  Canada.  • 

5H0:\rAKER,  HON.  JEZEEEL,  deceased,  son  of  Lakey 
and  Sally  Ellis,  was  born  in  Bourbon  county,  Ken- 
tucky, October  29,  1796.  He  was  brought  up  as  a 
frontiersman  in  Pendleton  county,  where  he  was  engaged 
in  lumbering  and  farming.  April  1,  1824,  he  married 
Nancy,  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  Eobinson  Golden, 
born  in  Pendleton  county,  Kentucky,  April  22,  1808. 
About  1828  they  removed  to  Illinois  and  located  in 
Adams  county,  near  Quincy,  where  he  homesteaded  160 
acres  of  land  and  purchased  other  claims,  having  the 


182  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

largest  farm  in  the  county.  AA'hen  neighbors  settled 
around  him  he  donated  land  for  a  school-house,  which 
was  erected.  He  became  quite  a  prominent  man  in 
Adams  county,  giving  quarters  to  all  religious  societies, 
yet  claiming  allegiance  to  none,  until  in  the  40's,  when 
he  joined  the  Mormon  Church.  This  required  the  selling 
or  giving  away  of  all  he  had,  and  in  1847  he  fitted  up 
teams  and  wagons  and  crossed  the  plains,  arriving  in 
Salt  Lake  Citj'  with  the  pioneers  in  Capt.  Charles  Rich's 
company.  His  wife  rode  in  a  carriage  and  drove  a  horse 
team  all  the  way. 

He  first  located  in  Salt  Lake  City,  then  removed  to 
Sessions  settlement,  near  Bountiful.  In  the  fall  of  1849 
he  joined  the  pioneers  and  came  to  Sanpete,  locating  in 
Manti,  one  of  the  first  colonists.  Here  he  remained  un- 
til his  death,  which  occurred  May  30,  1879.  He  had  good 
teams  and  ])lenty  of  provisions  when  coming  to  Manti, 
and  assisted  many  poor  families  in  getting  the  neces- 
saries of  life.  When  the  church  wanted  money  the 
leaders  called  upon  Fath(»T  Shomaker  and  secured  a 
portion  of  his  savings.  If  the  poor  needed  grain  or 
clothing  they  never  called  on  him  without  getting  as- 
sistance. He  prospered  in  the  accumulation  of  land  and 
property,  and  occupied  many  prominent  positions  in 
civil  and  ecclesiastical  matters,  serving  as  Mayor  for 
three  terais  and  being  a  member  of  the  first  City  Coun- 
cil. His  childr-en  were:  Sally,  wife  of  HaiTison  Fugate 
of  Emeiy  county;  Jerusha,  widow  of  George  P.  Billings; 
Ezra,  a  prominent  citizen  of  Manti;  Laura,  widow  of  Jo- 
seph Tuttle;  and  Lakey,  a  well-known  farmer  and  sheep- 
OA\ner,  of  Manti,  who  are  living;  John  G.,  Theophilus, 
Marion  and  Jeptha,  deceased. 

5HOEMAKER,  JOEL,  journalist,  son  of  Newton  and 
Emily  J.  Taylor,  was  born  in  Pendleton  county  Ky., 
Octoi3er  2,  i862.  He  attended  the  home  district 
schools,  Butler  High  school  and  State  University.  At  the 
age  of  16  he  began  as  a  newspaper  correspondent  and 
has  followed  that  continuously  in  college  and  while  pur- 
suing other  vocations.  Spent  two  years  in  the  central 
States  as  writer,  lecturer  and  organizer  for  the  Patrons 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  183 

of  HusbanclrY  aud  other  societies.  Came  to  Utah  in  1883 
and  has  taught  High  school  and  district  schools  in  San- 
pete, Weber  and  Grand  counties.  Was  Ogden  represen- 
ti-tive  of  the  Salt  Lake  Times  one  year.  Served  two 
jears  as  assistant  editor  of  the  Irrigation  Age,  Mining 
Age  and  Times.  Was  the  first  editor  of  the  Manti  Mes- 
senger for  two  years,  malving  it  then  the  leading  Eepub- 
lican  Aveeklv  of  Utah,  and  aided  very  materially  in  carry- 
ing the  city,  county  and  State  the  only  years  the  party 
has  been  successful.  Was  editor  of  the  Logan  Eepubli- 
can  for  a  time.  Is  an  honoray  member  of  the  Utah  Irri- 
gation Association  and  has  been  a  delegate  to  several 
Western  congresses  and  conventions.  Has  served  as  vice- 
president  and  historian  of  the  Utah  Press  Association 
and  vice-president  of  the  Western  Editorial  Federation. 
Has  written  four  books  on  irrigation,  co-operation  and 
kindred  subjects,  and  is  well  known  throughout  the 
world  as  a  i)rominent  contributor  to  the  leading  agricul- 
tural, sporting  and  travel  publications.  He  claims  no 
religion  but  that  of  humanity.  Was  married  in  Manti 
September  15,  1885,  to  Luella,  daughter  of  George  P. 
and  Jerusha  Billings,  born  in  Manti  September  15,  1885. 
They  have  had  six  children:  Blaine  and  Nannie,  living; 
Maggie,  Tallula,  George  and  Gail,  deceased. 

$IDWELL,  MRS.  ADELIA  B.,  rancher,  daughter  of 
Oiwille  S.  and  Elvira  P.  Mills  Cox,  was  born  in 
Lima,  111.,  December  1,  1841.  Her  father  was 
born  in  Plymouth,  Xew  York,  and  removed  to  Nelson, 
Ohio,  thence  to  Lima,  Illinois,  where  he  married  Elvira 
P.  Mills,  born  March  2,  1820.  In  1845  they  were  driven 
with  the  Mormons  to  Nauvoo,  in  1846  removed  to  Pisgah, 
Iowa,  and  in  1847  came  to  Utah  in  Capt.  Eobinson's  com- 
pany of  1850,  father  being  captain  of  the  "Pisgah  Mor- 
mons," arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City  October  2,  1847.  His 
son,  Orville  M.,  was  born  in  the  old  adobe  fort  in  Novem- 
ber and  is  supposed  to  be  the  oldest  living  male  child 
bom  in  Salt  Lake  City.  Father  removed  to  Bountiful  in 
spring  of  1848  and  was  called  by  President  Young  to  go 
in  Father  Morley's  company  to  colonize  Manti,  arriving 
here  in  November,  1849.     He  built  the  first  saw  pit  and 


184  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

George  P.  Billings  assisted  him  in  sawing  lumber  for  the 
first  floor  in  Manti.  In  March,  1850,  Delaun  was  born 
and  is  the  oldest  male  child  now  living  born  in  Sanpete 
county.  Father  was  captain  of  minute  men  in  the 
Walker  war  and  counsellor  to  Bishop  Lowry.  He  re- 
moved to  Fairview  in  1860;  w^as  then  called  to  colonize 
the  Muddy  countiy,  but  the  colonists  were  counseled  to 
leave  their  homes  because  of  dispute  over  boundary  line 
between  Utah  and  Nevada  and  returned  to  Orderville, 
where  many  of  his  descendants  now  reside.  Keturned 
again  to  Fairview,  where  he  died  Independence  Day, 
1888.  Adelia  was  married  in  Manti  by  Bishop  Moft'itt 
April  13,  18()4,  to  George  Sidwell,  a  pioneer.  He  was  a 
captain  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  built  the  Willardsen 
grist  mill  and  a  sawmill  in  Ephraim  and  the  Manti  roller 
mill.  He  died  September  20,  1883,  leaving  eight  children: 
Susan,  Corinne,  Bosalia,  Vivian,  Elvira,  George,  Lafay- 
ette and  Gideon. 


$MITH  AZARIAH,  one  of  the  oldest  settlers  of  Manti, 
son  of  Alber-t  and  Esther  Dutcher,  was  bom  in 
Oswego  county,  New  York,  August  1,  1828.  The 
family  removed  to  Ohio  when  he  was  7  and  joined  the 
Moi'mon  Church.  In  1839  they  Avent  to  Nauvoo,  111., 
where  he  was  baptized,  his  father  assisting  in  building 
the  temple.  In  184G  he  and  father  enlisted  in  the  Mor- 
mon battalion,  raised  for  the  Mexican  war.  They  were 
discharged  in  California.  His  father  came  to  Utah,  and 
Azariah  turned  back,  on  advice  from  Brigham  Young, 
and  worked  in  California  on  the  Sutter  mill  race  where 
gold  was  discovered.  He  now  gets  a  pension  from  the 
Government  and  in  1898  was  a  guest  of  honor  in  the 
Semi-Centennial  celebration  in  California.  In  1848  he 
returned  to  Salt  Lake  City,  and  in  1849  came  to  Manti, 
with  his  father  and  mother,  sisters  Emily,  Candace  and 
Esther,  and  brother  Joseph.  Soon  after  their  arrival  he 
was  taken  sick  and  was  not  able  to  work  for  nearly  20 
years.  He  has  been  active  in  church  work  and  assisted 
in  building  the  temple.  His  first  wife  was  Camilla  A. 
Taylor,  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  April  10,  1849.     She 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  185 

has  two  liying  children.     Second  wife,  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City,  October  9, 1871,  was  Joanne  M.  Christensen. 

5XOAA^,  GAliDXEli  E.,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
\A'arren  S.  and  Mary  A.  Yoorhees,  Avas  born  in  Pot- 
towatamie  county,  Iowa,  June  1,  1848.  In  1852  the 
family,  consisting  of  three  sons  and  one  daughter,  came 
to  Utah,  and  in  1851  located  in  Manti.  He  owns  a  fifty- 
acre  farm  and  his  city  residence  besides  about  15U0 
sheep.  During  the  past  eleven  years  he  has  been  ac- 
tively engaged  as  a  traveling  thresherman,  owning  an 
interest  in  a  good  machine.  In  the  Black  Hawk  war  he 
took  an  active  part  in  the  first  engagement.  He  was  City 
Marshal  five  years,  member  of  the  police  force  five  years 
and  deputy  sheriff  two  and  a  half  years.  His  wife  was 
Esther  P.,  daughter  of  Walter  and  Jemima  Cox.  She 
owns  stock  in  the  Co-op  store.  They  were  married  in 
Manti,  January  3,  1869,  and  have  eight  children:  Edna 
L.,  Esther  L.,  Adelaide  M.,  Periy  G.,  Alice,  Frederick  W., 
Alida  and  Clifford  H. 

5 NOW,  GEOKGE,  of  Manti,  son  of  Gardner  and  Sarah 
S.  (Hastings)  Snow,  was  bom  in  St.  Johnsburg, 
Caledonia  County,  Vermont,  September  8,  1820. 
His  father  was  a  carpenter  and  joined  the  Mormon 
church  about  1831.  With  his  wife  and  daughter  Martha, 
he  came  to  Manti  in  1850,  where  he  died,  aged  97  years. 
He  took  an  active  part  in  the  Walker  war;  was  Probate 
Judge  one  term  and  was  prominent  in  the  Mormon 
church,  being  a  member  of  the  High  Council.  Our  sub- 
ject came  to  Manti  in  1852  with  two  brothers,  James  and 
Warren  S.,  both  since  deceased.  He  followed  his  trade 
of  cooper  for  some  years  and  was  sub-agent  to  the  Ute 
tribe  of  Indians  three  years.  Studied  law  and  practiced 
before  the  bar  about  ten  years  and  was  Prosecuting  At- 
torney for  the  county  about  ten  years;  City  Alderman 
three  terms;  precinct  Magistrate  three  terms.  During 
both  Indian  wars  he  was  a  drum  major.  During  the 
past  eleven  years  he  has  been  agent  for  George  A.  Lowe, 
selling  agricultural   implements.     He  married  in   Kirt- 


186  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

land,  Ohio,  in  1839  to  Maiy,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and 
Eunice  Wells,  who  died  September  4,  1893,  leaving  four 
children,  Marj,  Eunice,  Sarah  and  Gardner.  He  mar- 
ried as  second  wife  in  Manti  in  1860  Eunice  Warner, 
widow,  a  daughter  of  Titus  and  Diantha  Billings;  their 
€hildren  are:    George,  Lydia,  Yilate  and  Titus. 

3 QUIRE,  AABON  D.,  butcher,  son  of  John  P.  and 
Adelia,  was  born  in  Manti  May  6,  1859.  He  was 
brought  up  on  a  far-m  and  has  farmed  all  his  life. 
Owns  a  nice  fann  of  ninety  acres  and  a  residence  in  the 
city.  In  May,  1896,  he  engaged  in  the  butcher  business 
and  now  has  a  nice  shop.  Was  man-ied  in  Logan  to 
Mary,  daughter  of  Charles  O.  and  Ann  Luke,  born  in 
Manti.  She  had  one  child:  Aaron  D.  (deceased.)  Wife 
died  and  he  married  in  Manti  June  6,  1888,  Eliza  J. 
daughter  of  George  and  Jane  Bench,  born  in  Manti. 
They  have  four  childi'en:  Franklin,  Nellie,  Lorette  and 
George. 

5Qi;iBE,  JOHN  r.,  deceased,  sun  of  Aaron  and  Eliza- 
beth, was  born  in  Bainbridge,  Geauga  county.  New 
York,  March  30,  1824.  He  grew  up  in  New  York 
and  went  to  Illinois,  where  he  joined  the  Mormon  Church 
in  1847.  In  1852  he  came  to  Utah  Avith  Lorenzo  Snow, 
who  married  one  of  his  sisters.  He  then  came  direct  to 
Manti  and  located  there.  He  taught  school  in  winter 
and  fanned  in  summer  for  several  years.  Took  part  in 
the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  a  Lieutenant.  Was  an  ac- 
tive worker  in  church  and  Sunday  school.  During  the 
last  years  of  his  life  he  was  in  ill-health.  He  died  April 
25,  1872.  Was  married  in  Manti,  December  31,  1853,  to 
Adelia,  daughter  of  Freeborn  and  Annie  Knight  De  ]N[ill, 
born  in  Jackson  county.  Mo.,  September  29,  1832.  Her 
parents  came  here  in  1850,  having  joined  the  Mormon 
Church  in  1830,  among  the  first  members.  They  were 
highly  respected  citizens  and  both  died  here.  Her  chil- 
dren are:  John  P.,  Aaron  D.,  Adelia  L.,  Eliza  R.  and 
Oliver  E.,  living;  Orpha,  Anna  M.  and  Harriet  A.,  de- 
ceased. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  187 

5QU1KP],  OLIVER  E.,  farmer  and  brickmaker,  son  of 
John  P.  and  Adelia,  was  born  in  Manti,  February 
2G,  1867.  He  was  raised  to  fanning  and  owns  a.  nice 
35-acre  farm.  Is  also  interested  with  Charles  Wintch  in 
ibe  manufacture  of  brick,  having  yards  three  miles  south 
ct'  the  citT>  They  make  about  100,000  sand  roll  brick 
yeai'ly.  Was  maxTied  in  Manti  temple,  October  30,  1889, 
to  Alice  Jones.  She  had  one  child,  Alice,  and  died  Au- 
gust 2C,  1800.  Married  again  May  29,  1895,  to  Dia.ntha, 
daughter  of  Daniel  O.  and  Ellen  Anderson,  born  in  Nor- 
AA'av,  January  30,  1872.  They  haAe  two  children:  Rosa- 
rdond,  born  March  15,  189C,  and  Ruby,  May  20,  1897. 

5TECK,  JENS  F.,  farmer,  son  of  Ghristian  P.  and 
Maria  S.  Waas,  was  bora  in  Denmark,  June  28, 
1833.  He  served  in  the  Danish  arm.^  2^  years,  un- 
der Frederick  VIL,  and  in  1854  joined  the  Mormon 
Churr-h.  In  1861  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
ID  an  oxtrain,  under  Oapt.  Wooley.  Stopped  the  first 
Yvinter  in  Manti,  then  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  was 
called  in  1865  to  assist  in  settling  Circle  Valley,  and 
M'ent  to  Marysvale,  where  he  took  up  land  and  helped 
build  the  forts.  In  1866,  Avhen  they  had  to'  leave  on 
account  of  Indian  troubles,  he  returned  to  Manti,  and 
has  since  been  engaged  in  farming.  He  took  an  active 
jiart  in  the  Black  Hawk  Avar,  doing  his  part  of  the  many 
duties.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store  and  an  in- 
dastrious,  hard-working  man.  He  was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City  in  December,  1867,  to  Inger  Hansen.  She  died 
July  10,  1884,  leaving!  ten  children:  Maria,  wife  of 
<>eorge  Thurgood;  Petrea,  wife  of  David  F.  Sliaind;  Mary, 
wife  of  John  J.  Reeis;  James  F.,  married  tO'  Silveretta. 
Dickson;  Joseph  S.,  married  to  Amelia  M.  Dennison; 
Hyrum  S.,  married  to  Lillian  Marker;  Heber  C.  and  Anna 
M.,  at  home.  Elvena  I.  and  an  unnamed  infant,  de- 
ceased. He  was  mairried  again  March  28,  1894,  to  Jane 
Reid,  bora  December  14,  1832. 

$TRINGHAM,    WALTER,     builder,  of    Manti,  son  of 
William  and  Polly  (Knight),  born  in  Clay  county, 
Mo.,  February  4,  1837.    Parents  joined  the  Monnou 
church  in  1830,  when  the  entire  membership  numbered 


188  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

six.  In  1856  the  family  came  to  Utah  in  Canute  Peter- 
son's train,  and  in  February,  1857,  they  located  in  Manti. 
Father  was  a  hard  worker  for  the  church.  He  was  or- 
dained High  Priest  in  Nauvoo,  and  passed  through  all 
the  persecutions  in  the  States,  and  died  in  Manti  Novem- 
ber 3,  1865,  in  his  78th  year. 

Walter  learned  the  trade  of  plasterer  in  Illinois,  and 
has  worked  at  that  ever  since  coming  to  Manti;  also  lay- 
ing stone  and  brick.  He  has  also  a  nice  thirty-acre  farm, 
wliicli  his  sons  work,  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  new 
Union  IJoller  Mills.  During  the  Black  Hawk  war  Mr.  S. 
played  in  the  mai'tial  band  and  was  in  the  saddle  much 
of  the  time.  In  Oastle  Valley,  in  1858,  he  was,  with  forty 
others,  in  a  skirmish  with  the  Indians,  Avhom  the}^  Avere 
pursuing  to  recover  stolen  stoclv,  and  had  his  horse  shot 
from  under  him.  'Mr.  S.  is  a  good,  reliable  citizen,  and 
well  liked  by  tlie  people  of  Manti. 

He  manied  in  Manti,  June  19,  1859,  to  Maiy  E., 
daughter  of  Jolm  H.  and  Sabra  A.  Tuttle,  born  in  Han- 
cock county.  111.,  May  5,  1844.  Their  family  of  fifteen 
children  are  named  Julia  A.,  Sabra  E.,  Almira,  deceased, 
AValter,  TJowena,  John  H.,  Luther  A.,  Mary  G.,  William 
G.,  Elmeda  F.,  Hvrum  R.,  Rosa  M.,  Charles  M.,  Homer 
M.  and  Delia  T. 


5TRIXGHAM,  WALTER,  JR.,  photographer,  son  of 
Walter  and  Maiy  E.,  was  bom  in  Manti  January 
18,  1865,  where  he  Avas  educated  and  resides.  At 
the  age  of  19  he  was  employed  by  G.  E.  Anderson  of 
Springville  and  worked  six  years  in  his  photo  gallery. 
He  spent  six  months  with  Morris  &  Co.,  Salt  Lake  City, 
and  traveled  through  Utah,  Idaho  and  Wyoming,  finally 
opening  a  gallery  in  this  city  with  James  E.  Ellis  as 
partner.  He  now  owns  the  business  and  is  a  fine  artist 
in  portrait  and  view  work.  Is  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  U. 
W.  and  has  been  financier  and  held  other  offices  in  the 
lodge.  His  wife,  to  whom  he  was  married  in  Manti  No- 
vember 30,  1892,  was  Mary  E.,  daughter  of  John  E.  and 
Mary  Metcalf.  They  have  one  son,  W.  Lynn,  born  Sep- 
tember 12,  1893. 


HISTOKY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  189 

SENNANT,  nON.  ALEXANDEE,  Mayor,  and  superin- 
tendent of  Manti  Co-op,  is  a  native  of  Dumfermline, 
Scotland,  and  was  born  January  3,  1851,  son  of 
Charles  and  Margaret  (Stenliouse)  Tennaut.  The  father 
was  a  bookbinder  and  died  in  Scotland  in  185G,  and  the 
mother  died  in  Manti  in  1874,  having  become  the  wife  of 
John  (Jrier  after  her  husband's  death,  and  who  is  now  a 
resident  of  Provo.  Mr.  Tennant  learned  the  trade  of  a 
ropemaker,  and  the  family  came  to  Utah  and 
located  in  Manti  in  186(5,  where  Aleck,  as  he  is  familiarly 
known,  worked  at  various  occupations.  In  1880  he  en- 
tered the  Co-op  as  a  clerk  and  gradually  accumulated 
stock  therein,  and  in  1890  was  appointed  its  superin- 
tendent, Avhich  iJosition  ^e  has  since  tilled.  Is  interested 
in  the  Manti  Lumber  Company.  Is  a  member  of  the  A. 
O.  U.  W.  and  was  its  first  treasurer  and  is  the  present  re- 
corder; was  Justice  of  the  Peace  several  years;  member 
of  the  City  Council  1889  and  1890,  City  Treasurer  1891 
and  1892,  and  elected  Mayor  in  the  fall  of  1897.  He  mar- 
ried in  Manti  April  12,  1874,  Miss  Sarah  Snow,  daughter 
of  George  and  Mary,  who  were  among  the  early  settlers; 
her  father  was  prominent  in  all  the  Indian  troubles,  be- 
ing drum  major. 

Mr.  Tennant  has  four  children,  viz.:  Mary  B.,  Alex- 
ander, Charles  and  Margaret;  has  a  lovely  home  and 
pleasant  surroundings.  He  is  an  active  worker  in  the 
Mormon  church,  and  is  assistant  superintendent  in  the 
Manti  North  Sunday  school.  He  was  an  active  worker 
in  the  Young  Men's  Mutual  Improvement  Association,  of ' 
which  he  was  secretary  some  time  and  president  two  or 
three  years.  Is  one  of  the  true  and  tried  men  of  Manti, 
ever  charitable,  kind  to  all  and  generous  to  a  fault,  and 
one  whose  monument  of  integrity  to  duty  will  ever  stand. 


SOOTH,  JAMES  C,  farmer,  son  of  James  F.  and  Sarah 
Chadwick,  was  born  in  Nebraska  as  the  family  was 
enroute    to    Utah,  August    17,  1853.     The    family 
came  from  London,  England,  and  located  in  Manti  in 
October,  1853.    Father  was  Sexton  for  many  years;  died 
January  16,  1878;  mother  died  February  15,  1896.  James 


190  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

has  always  followed  farming.  Has  been  a  ward  teacher 
for  sixteen  years.  Was  married  in  Manti  to  Elizabeth 
C,  daughter  of  Charles  O.  and  Ann  Luke,  born  in  Manti. 
She  had  one  child:  James  O.  (deceased.)  Wife  died  June 
5,  1878.  He  married  again  April  20,  1881,  to  Agnes, 
daughter  of  John  P.  and  Margaret  Reid.  They  have 
seven  children:  Sarah,  John  C,  William  E.,  Marj^,  Ed- 
ward K.,  Glenn  and  Lucy. 

7"UTTLE,  ALBERT,  deceased,  son  of  Luther  T.  and 
V3  Lola  A.,  was  born  in  Pottowatamie  County,  Iowa, 
October  20,  1854.  The  family  removed  to  Manti 
when  he  Avas  about  9  y<?ars  old  and  he  grew  to  man- 
hood in  this  city.  He  was  a  prominent  and  influential 
business  man  and  politician  and  at  the  time  of  his  death, 
January  1,  1895,  was  cashier  of  the  Manti  City  Savings 
Bank,  treasurer  of  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Co.,  and  a 
member  of  the  mercantile  firm  of  L.  T.  Tuttle  &  Co. 
He  was  an  active  charter  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W. 
and  served  as  City  Councillor.  His  death  was  caused 
b}'  a  fall  on  the  sidewalk,  striking  the  base  of  the  spine 
and  causing  concussion  of  the  brain.  He  was  married 
in  St.  George,  Utah,  December  1,  1880,  to  Lucia  I., 
daughter  of  Walter  and  Emeline  Cox,  born  in  Manti, 
I'ebniary  4,  1860. 

They  had  six  childi'en: — Bernice,  born  October  17, 
1881;  Isabelle,  October  25,  1883;  Albert  M.,  November 
14,  1885;  Rubv  R.,  Mav  26,  1888;  Blaine  E.,  December 
30,  1890,  and  Lucille,  October  25,  1893. 

J^UTTLE,  AZARIAH,  of  Manti,  son  of  Terry  and 
v3  Eleanor  (Mills),  Avas  born  in  New  York  City,  April 
20,  1818.  His  father  died  when  he  was  9  years  old, 
and  he  had  to  begin  to  work  early  to  help  support  the 
family.  He  worked  in  a  printing  oflSce,  and  Avhen  15  was 
bound  out  to  learn  the  trade  of  sparmaker.  He  served 
four  years  and  nine  months,  when  he  joined  the  Mormon 
church  in  December,  1837,  through  hearing  Parley  Pratt 
and  Elijah  Fordham  preach.  They  moved  to  Missouri 
in  1838,  and  were  all  through  the  persecutions  in  Farr 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  191 

West,  Adams  county,  and  iu  Xau^oo.  lu  fall  of  1847, 
with  his  wife  and  two  children,  he  left  Nauvoo  and  win- 
tered at  Winter  Quarters,  intending  to  come  to  Utah. 
They  returned  to  Missouri  on  account  of  the  Indians,  and 
in  1852  they  started  in  Bishop  Howell's  train  and  arrived 
in  Provo  September  15th.  Isaac  Morley  induced  them 
to  come  to  Manti,  where  they  arrived  October  12,  1852. 
All  through  the  Indian  troubles  Mr.  Tuttle  took  part,  be- 
ing a  member  of  the  Silver  Greys.  In  early  days  he  was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  several  3  ears,  and  City  Wa- 
termaster  about  twenty  years. 

Married  in  New  York  City,  March  11,  1838,  to  Ann, 
daughter  of  Thomas  and  Ann  Mabbot,  born  in  Yorkshire, 
England,  December  2,  1821.  Their  children  are  Azariah, 
Horion,  William  and  Abigail. 


6UTTLE,  FRANK  P.,  of  the  firm  of  L.  T.  Tuttle  & 
Sons,  merchants,  of  Manti,  is  a  son  of  Hon.  Luther 
T.  and  Lola  A.,  born  in  Macedonia,  Iowa,  May  24, 
1858.  In  1863  the  family  came  to  Manti,  where  Frank 
worked  on  the  farm  as  he  was  growing  up.  When  he 
began  business  for  himself  he  embarked  in  stockraising, 
and  later  changed  to  Avool-growing",  in  which  he  has  been 
successful.  He  now  has  about  5000  head  of  sheep  and 
for  the  past  ten  years  he  has  been  buying  and  shipping 
sheep  for  the  Standard  Meat  and  Live  Stock  Company 
of  Denver.  In  1883  he  bought  one-half  the  interest  of 
James  Barton,  who  was  in  business  with  his  father,  and 
new  the  firm  of  L.  T.  Tuttle  and  Sons  are  well  and  favor- 
ably known  in  southern  Utah.  Frank  P.  is  now  one  of 
i  he  substantial  men  of  Sanpete  county,  and  usually  takes 
the  lead  in  any  business  enterprise  started  in  the  town. 
He  is  a  director  in  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Company,  the 
Manti  City  Savings  Bank  and  the  new  Union  Roller 
Mills.  He  also  has  a  fine  faiin  near  town  of  about  100 
acres,  and  a  nice  new  residence  three  blocks  east  of  the 
Court  House.  He  was  married  in  Manti  October  13, 1881, 
to  Arietta  M.,  daughter  of  Frederick  W.  and  Cordelia 
Cox.  They  have  six  children,  as  follows:  Frank  L.,  Jes- 
sie (deceased),  Lola,  Leonard,  Fannie  and  Leah. 


192  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

SUTTLE,  JOHN  HEXKY,  retired  farmer,  son  of  Terry 
and  Eleanor,  was  born  in  New  York  City,  June  19, 
1821.  At  the  ajie  of  15  lie  was  "bound  out''  to  learn 
the  wood-turner's  trade,  where  he  worked  till  1838,  when 
he  removed  West,  stopping  a  while  in  Missouri  and  locat- 
ing in  Hancock  county.  111.  He  left  there  in  1816,  and 
resided  two  years  at  Garden  Grove,  Iowa,  going  to  Coun- 
cil Bluffs,  from  which  he  started  June  9,  1852,  with  Capt. 
Howells  for  Utah,  taking  his  wife  and  four  children  in 
an  ox  team.  He  came  to  31anti  in  October,  1852,  took  up 
40  acres  of  land  and  erected  a  home  in  the  city,  where  he 
has  since  resided.  In  the  Indian  wars  he  did  his  share, 
being  Captain  of  com])any  B,  Home  Guards.  Is  a  small 
wool-grower,  and  owns  stock  in  the  Manti  Co-op.  store. 
His  first  wife  was  Sabra  \'oorhees,  to  whom  he  was  mar- 
ried in  Hancock  county,  111.,  May  14,  1843.  She  died  Oc- 
tober 10,  1853,  leaving  three  children,  Mai-y  E.,  wife  of 
Walter  Stringham,  Almira,  wife  of  John  Hall,  and  Lu- 
ther T.  The  second  wife  was  Sarah  S.,  widow  of  William 
Mills,  killed  by  Indians  in  1853.  She  died  February  12, 
1895.  Third  wife  was  Sarah  A.  Allen,  nee  Butler,  mar- 
ried June  28,  1895.  Her  ])arents  were  early  settlers  in 
Utah.  She  was  born  in  Xauvoo,  111.,  February  15,  1841, 
and  has  two  children,  John  B.  and  Sarah  E.,  wife  of  Ben- 
jamin Cameron,  Panguitch,  Ut^h. 

SUTTLE,  LOUIS  E.,  merchant,  farmer  and  wool  groAV- 
er,  member  of  the  flnu  of  L.  T.  Tuttle  &  Co.,  was 
born  May  21,  1863,  in  Council  Bluffs,  la.,  and  is  a 
son  of  Luther  T.  and  Lola  E.  Tuttle.  The  family  came 
to  Manti  the  same  year,  and  Louis  E.  was  reared  as  a 
farmer  and  has  always  lived  in  Manti.  Married  here, 
December  19,  1888,  Mary  C.  Clark,  daughter  of  John 
Haslem  and  Theresa  E.  Clark,  who  were  among  the 
early  settlers  of  Sanpete,  she  was  born  in  Manti.  They 
have  a  nice,  comfortable  home,  he  also  has  a  farm  of 
tv»'enty-flve  acres  near  town.  They  have  three  children, 
Louis  T.,  Hazel  E.,  and  Allen  E.  Mr.  Tuttle  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  I.  O.  O.  F.,  and  in  1897  held  the  office  of  Noble 
Grand  of  Temple  City  Lodge  No.  23  of  Manti.  Is  actively 
engaged  in  the  stock  and  sheep  industry,  and  has  in  con- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  193 

uectiou  with  his  father  a  flock  of  6000  sheep,  is  quiet  and 
unassuming  in  Ms  business  deportment,  but  is  one  of 
Manti's  men  of  tried  integrity  and  honesty. 

5UTTLE,  LUTHEE,  of  Manti,  was  born  near  Council 
Bluffs,  Iowa,  July  16,  1S19.  He  is  a  son  of  John  H. 
and  Sabra  A.  The  family  came  to  Manti  in  1852. 
Luther  was  raised  to  farm  work  and  when  he  grew  up 
he  took  up  and  bought  land  and  now  has  210  acres  of 
fine  land  near  Manti.  For  the  last  thirteen  years  he  has 
followed  woolgrowing,  in  which  he  has  been  yery  suc- 
cessful, and  now  has  3000  head  of  fine  sheep.  Mr.  Tuttle 
is  an  entei-prisiug,  shrewd  business  man  and  usually 
takes  a  leading  part  in  any  business  enterprise  started 
in  the  town.  When  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Company  was 
organized  in  1891  he  became  one  of  the  directoi*s  and  has 
since  attended  to  the  buying  of  hides  and  wool  for  the 
company.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Manti  City  Sayings 
Bank  and  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  In  1891  he 
opened  a  harness  store  in  the  Tuttle  Block  and  placed 
his  son,  Luther  E.,  in  charge.  They  do  a  large  business 
and  manufacture  a  fine  line  of  harness,  saddles,  etc. 

He  was  maiTied  in  Manti  January  3,  1870,  to  Emily, 
daughter  of  Frederick  W.  and  Emeline  Cox,  who  was 
born  near  Fort  Laramie  August  8,  1852,  while  the  family 
wei'^  enroute  by  ox  team  to  Utah.  Their  children  are: 
Luella,  Luther  E.,  Eoscoe  C,  Lawrence,  Frederick,  John, 
Burton,  Edward,  Lloyd  and  Maud. 

5UTTLE,  HOX.  LUTHER  T.,  a  prominent  merchant, 
banker  and  stock  dealer  of  Manti,  is  a  native  of  New 
York,  born  Xoyember  19,  1825.  His  father  was  a 
shipbuilder  by  trade  and  died  when  Luther  was  but 
fourteen  months  old,  leaving  three  sons  and  one  daugh- 
ter, of  which  the  subject  of  this  sketch  is  the  youngest. 
Both  brothers  are  now  residents  of  Manti. 

When  he  was  12  years  of  age  his  mother  haying 
joined  the  church  of  Latter-day  Saints,  the  family  moyed 
to  Missouri  and  the  same  year  Luther  went  to  liye  with 
his  uncle,  a  hotel-keeper  in  St.  Louis.    In  1846,  when  the 


194  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Mormon  Battalion  was  being  organized,  Luther  became 
imbued  with  the  desire  to  go  to  California  and  joined 
the  comijany  three  days  after  his  marriage  with  Abigail 
Haws,  at  Council  Bluffs,  low^a.  After  an  absence  of 
eighteen  mouths,  with  the  rank  of  Orderly  Sergeant,  he 
returned  to  Council  Bluffs  and  engaged  in  the  fur  trade 
as  agent  for  Peter  A.  Sarpev,  of  the  Amei-ican  Fur  Com- 
pany. His  next  venture  was  in  the  lumber  business  at 
the  little  town  of  Macedonia,  about  twenty-live  miles  east 
of  Council  Bluffs,  where  he  built  a  sawmill  and  later  a 
flouring  mill.  He  remained  at  Macedonia  in  the  milling 
business  until  ISBH,  when  he  came  to  Ftah  and  located 
at  Manti.  Here  he  fornu'd  a,  pai'tnership  with  Mr.  E,  W. 
Fox  and  opened  a  general  store  under  the  firm  name  of 
Tuttle  &  Fox.  This  business  continued  successfully  for 
about  five  years,  when  it  Avas  sold  to  the  Co-op,  Mr. 
Tuttle  remaining  in  the  emi>loy  of  the  latter  company  for 
several  years.  In  1875  the  desire  to  go  into  business  for 
himsielf  again  took  possession  of  him,  and  in  partnershij) 
with  Hari-ison  E(h\a.rds  he  embai'ked  in  a  general  mer- 
chandise and  lumber  business.  This  business  grew  rap- 
idly and  a  few  years  afterwards  Mr.  Tuttle's  two  sons, 
Albert  and  Frank,  wei-e  admitted  to  the  finn,  the  per- 
sonnel of  which  is  the  same  today  with  the  exception 
that  the  intei-est  of  Albert.  Tuttle,  who  died  in  January, 
1895,  is  now  held  by  his  Avidow. 

Througli  the  efforts  of  Mr.  Tuttle,  Sr.,  the  firm  has 
enlarged  its  business  extensively  and  in  1891  erected  one 
of  the  finest  business  blocks  in  southern  Utah.  The  build- 
ing has  a  frontage  of  uinety-tAvo  feet,  is  sixty  feet  deep 
and  two  stories  high,  Avitli  an  iron  front. 

Luther  T.  Tuttle  has  long  been  one  of  the  most 
prominent  figures  in  public  life  in  Manti,  having  been 
twice  elected  Mayor  of  the  city,  several  times  member 
of  the  City  Council  and  a  member  of  the  Territorial  Legis- 
lature from  Sanpete  County  for  four  terms.  In  church 
matters  he  takes  a  prominent  part  and  is  at  present  a 
member  of  the  High  Council  of  Sanpete  Stake.  In  1890 
he  organized  tJie  Manti  Savings  Bank  with  a  capital  of 
$25,000,  which  has  since  been  increased  to  |50,000.  He 
was  unanimously  chosen  as  president  of  the  institution, 


GKO.    P.    BILLINOS, 
MANTl. 


.]()KL    StJOMAl^lOK. 
MANTl. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  195 

which  position  he  has  held  since  its  organization.  Tlie 
other  officers  of  the  bank  are  as  follows:  Peter  Dyreng, 
cashier;  J.  H.  Caii^euter,  assistant  cashier;  James  Craw- 
ford, William  G.  Crawford,  Frank  Tuttle  and  J.  B. 
Maiben,  directors. 

Besides  his  interests  already  mentioned,  Mr,  Tnttle 
is  also  extensiyely  engaged  in  sheep  raising,  now  being 
the  owner  of  about  3500  head.  He  is  also  a  stockholder  in 
the  Co-op  Roller  Mills. 

Mr.  Txittle  was  again  married  in  1850  to  Lola  Haws, 
a  sister  of  his  former  wife,  and  as  issue  of  such  marriage 
two  sons  and  two  daughters  are  now  living,  namely^ 
Frank,  Lilly,  Louis  and  Ethella. 

1  /bOEHEES,  AETHUR  P.,  dealer  in  sheep  and  cat- 
\J  tie,  son  of  Isaac  and-  Eliza  (Lewis),  born  in  Manti 
June  6,  1857.  He  was  reared  to  the  occupation  of 
a  farmer  and  when  about  20  years  of  age  he  began  buy- 
irg  and  shipping  cattle.  He  was  quite  successful,  so  he 
has  followed  it  ever  since.  During  the  season  of  1897 
he  was  engaged  in  buying  and  shipping  sheep  for  Henry 
Kearnes  to  A.  J.  Knollin  &  Co.  of  Kansas  City  and  Chi- 
cago, and  did  a  large  amount  of  business.  He  also  has 
about  3000  head  of  sheep  of  his  own,  a  nice  farm  near 
town,  and  a  fine  residence  east  of  the  business  center. 
Mr.  Voorhees  is  a  good  business  man  and  an  enterpris- 
ing citizen  and  stands  well  in  the  estimation  of  the  peo- 
ple. He  was  manied  in  Manti  April  29,  1879,  to  Louisa^ 
daughter  of  George  P.  and  Edith  Billings,  born  in  Manti 
August  23,  1858.  Their  children  are  Eloise,  Perry  and 
Glenn,  and  Leonard  and  Ralph,  deceased, 

1  /ORHEES,  ISAAC,  retired  farmer,  son  of  Elisha  and 
\J  Xaucy  Leek,  was  born  in  Clearmont  county,  Ohio,^ 
June  2,  1821.  His  parents  joined  the  Mormon 
church  in  early  days  and  emigratecl  to  Utah  in  1819,  in 
Warren  Snow's  company.  Isaac  drove  one  of  the  fifty 
teams  and  hunted  when  the  company  camped.  He  killed 
four  wagon  loads  of  buffalo  in  one  day.  Was  an  expert 
hunter,  and  made  one  trip  for  the  Government  from  Fort 


196  HISTOliY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Leavenwortli,  Kan.,  to  Old  Mexico,  and  oue  to  New 
Mexico,  freiglitiug  with  six  yolve  of  oxeu,  60,000  jDouuds 
on  each  wagon.  He  engaged  in  the  charcoal  business  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  removed  to  this  city  in  1854,  and  followed 
farming  and  stock-raising,  caring  for  his  parents,  who 
died  here.  During  the  Indian  wars  he  Avas  very  active 
in  guarding  stock  and  chasing  Indians,  and  losing  stock 
by  their  depredations.  He  was  married  in  Manti,  Jan- 
uary 10,  1855,  to  Eliza,  (hiughter  of  David  and  Elizabeth 
Lewis,  born  in  \\'ales,  November  25,  1838,  died  in  Manti, 
October  13,  1885.  Their  living  children  are  Elizabeth, 
wife  of  \Mlliam  Ellingford,  Ai'thur  P.,  Isaac  D.,  Stephen 
L.,  Esther,  widow  of  Hial  G.  Bradford,  and  Eraukliu. 

1  A)KIIEES.  SI'EPIIEN  L.,  stockraiser,  son  of  Isaac 
\j  and  Eliza.  Lewis,  was  born  in  Manti  June  25,  1861, 
where  he  was  educated  and  reared  a  fanner.  He 
was  a  freighter  to  tlie  mining  districts  of  Utah  and  Ne- 
vada and  engaged  Avitli  his  brothers  in  stockraising,  later 
purchasing  slun^p.  In  18',)5  he  built  a  tine  residence  at  a 
cost  of  about  f2500,  where  he  now  resides.  He  con- 
ducted a  meat  market  for  two  years  and  run  a  barber 
shop  for  some  time.  Being  an  excellent  musician,  he 
was  leader  of  the  Sunday  school  choir  for  seven  years 
and  the  Tabernacle  <lioir  for  two  years.  At  the  age  of 
16  he  joined  a,  hjcal  dramatic  company  and  assisted  very 
much  in  raising  funds  for  building  the  Temple  and  Tab- 
erna.clf^.  He  was  marricMl  in  Salt  Lake  Citv  November 
22,  1883,  to  Eliza,  (lauglitcr  of  AVilliam  T.  and  Jane  Mc- 
Ewan  Keid,  who  was  born  in  Parley's  Canyon  September 
22,  1862.  They  have  four  children:  Blanche,  Stephen 
and  Jane  E.,  living,  William  T.  being  dead, 

\\\  ALKEK,  JOHN,  deceased,  son  of  Henry  and  Bella, 
\yj  was  born  in  Carlisle,  England,  in  1832.     He  was  a 

roof-slatej'  and  when  about  20  years  of  age  joined 
the  Mormon  Church.  AA^as  married  in  Graetna  Gi'^en  in 
1860  to  Ellen  McSkelly,  a  native  of  England.  His  parents 
came  to  Utah  in  a  handcai't,  company,  father  dying  on 
the  road.     In  1880  he  and  family  came  to  Manti,  where 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY,  197 

he  assisted  in  building  tlie  Temple  and  worked  in  it  for 
several  years.  He  was  an  earnest  church  worker,  an 
elder  and  a  much  respected  citizen  of  the  community. 
He  died  May  18,  1894.  There  are  six  living  children: 
Bella,  John,  Nellie,  Elizabeth,  Mary  and  Agnes. 

1  !  ^ESTENSKOW,  HANS,  farmer  and  musician,  son  of 
\XJ  Ole  and  Maiy,  was  born  on  the  island  of  Falster, 
Denmark,  September  17,  1835.  His  father  was  a 
first-class  musician  and  Hans  studied  under  him  for  sev- 
eral years.  The  famih'  are  natural  musicians  and  many 
of  them  are  excellent  performers.  Hans  was  leader  of 
the  band  in  his  native  home  many  years  and  for  live 
years  was  a  music  teacher,  being  considered  very  profi- 
cient on  the  violin,  claronet,  cornet,  flute  and  bass  vial. 
He  joined  tlie  ^Mormon  Church  in  1862  and  in  1803  came 
to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt. 
Sanders  and  arrived  in  Manti  September  12,  18G3.  Was 
made  leader  of  the  Tabernacle  choir  and  has  followed 
music  teaching  most  of  his  life.  He  owns  a  small  farm 
and  is  a  leading  man  in  the  Churcli,  being  a  teacher, 
member  of  the  Elders'  quorum,  one  of  the  presidents  of 
Seventies  and  a  High  Priest.  Was  married  in  Denmark 
October  18,  1860,  to  Karen  Peterson.  She  died  in  Manti 
March  2,  1884.  Her  children  are:  Peter  H.,  Mary,  Han- 
nah, Hans,  Caroline,  Anna  C,  Magdalena,  William  H. 
and  Sarah,  living;  Ole  P.,  Louis  H.  and  Maria,  deceased. 
Second  wife  was  Karen  E.  Hansen,  born  March  2,  1852; 
married  April  18,  1869.  She  has  three  children:  JohUj 
Jens  P.  and  Margaret  B. 

1  !  A^STENSKOW,  HANS,  JR.,  a  canyon  worker,  son  of 
\XJ  Hans  and  Karen,  was  born  in  Manti,  March  8, 
1869.  He  was  raised  a  farmer,  but  since  he  grew 
to  manhood  has  been  engagetl  in  working  in  the  can- 
yons, getting  out  timber,  lumber  and  wood.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Manti  temple,  October  9,  1889,  to  Christena, 
daughter  of  Hans  and  Trena  Anderson,  bom  in  Den- 
mark, August  5,  1870.  They  have  four  children,  Christy, 
Orlando,  Clarence  and  Wallace. 


198  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

1  I  /eSTEXSKOW,  PETEE,  of  Manti,  sou  of  Ole  H.  and 
\XJ  Marv-^  (Hansen),  was  born  in  Ulslov,  on  the  island  of 
Falster,  Denmark,  October  4,  1837.  He  learned  the 
trade  of  shoemaker,  joined  the  ]Mornion  chnrch  in  18G2 
and  was  a  missionary  about  one  year,  when  he  joined 
the  army;  his  country  was  at  war  with  Germany,  Austria 
and  Prussia;  he  serA'ed  six  months  and  was  in  eight 
battles.  In  18()4:  he  emigrated  to  this  country  and  located 
in  ]Manti,  where  he  has  been  engaged  in  farming,  has  a 
nice  farm  of  sixty  acres  and  a  comfortable  residence  in 
town.  Mr.  AV.  is  a  natui-al  musician;  when  seven  years 
old  lie  could  play  the  violin  ;uid  soon  learned  to  play  the 
cornet  and  tlut(\  About  twenty  years  he  was  a  member 
of  the  Tabernacle  clioii-  and  many  years  was  in  the  Sun- 
day school  choir.  He  is  president  of  the  quorum  of  Sev- 
enties and  head  teacher  of  the  South  ward.  In  politics 
he  is  a  Republican  and  in  the  fall  of  189.")  was  elected 
member  of  the  City  Council.  In  1805  he  married  Annie 
D.,  (laughter  of  Ole  and  Anne  ^fadsen.  She  died  in 
]Manti.  Their  children  are:  Anne  ^I.  Doi-thea,  Neils  P., 
Eliza,  Erastus,  Josei)h  P.,  Jeuine  M.  and  Mary,  Ole  and 
Lewis  deceased.  His  second  wife,  Anna.  Petersen,  he 
married  Se]»tember  18,  18T(>.  Their  children  are:  An- 
netta,  Andrew,  Elice,  Julius,  Olivia  and  ]Mary. 

1  !  IINTCH,  JACOB,  faiiuer,  son  of  Henry  and  Anna 
\XJ  Biirkhard,  was  born  in  Zurich,  Switzerland,  Janu- 
ary 1,  1855,  and  emigrated  with  his  parents  to  Lehi, 
Utah,  in  1862.  In  1865  the  family  removed  to  Richfield, 
remaining  there  till  1867,  when  they  were  driven  out  by 
Indians,  and  settled  in  Manti.  He  was  raised  a  farmer 
and  has  alwiiys  tilled  the  soil,  owning  a  forty-acre  tract 
and  having  a  nice  two-story  brick  residence  in  the  city. 
He  is  a  director  and  treasurer  of  the  Manti  Co-op  Sheep- 
herding  and  Woolgrowing  Institution,  and  has  sei-^^ed 
four  years  as  Street  Supei'Aasor  under  the  Republican 
administration.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  the  St. 
George  Temple  October  27,  1881,  Avas  Sophia  Hansen. 
She  died  July  26,  1893,  leaving  four  children:  Wilford 
J.,  Jessie,  Nettie  M.,  and  Clara,  living,  Annie  and  Miran- 
da being-  dead. 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  199 

I  I  /ODSKOW,  JENS  HAN8EN,  Secretaiy  of  Manti  C. 
\XJ  ^i-  I-j  bora  in  the  village  of  Wodskow,  Deumark, 
Xovember  20,  1834.  He  joined  the  Mormon  Church 
1S56,  and  sjDent  seven  years  in  missionary  work  in  his 
native  land.  Came  to  Manti  in  1864  and  engaged  in 
farming  'till  1880,  when  he  entered  the  Co-op,  as  clerk, 
iind  in  Januaiy,  1881,  was  appoined  secretaiy,  and  is  a 
stockholder  in  the  institution.  Is  prominent  in  church 
matters.  Has  been  counsellor  to  Bishop  Reed  many 
years,  always  an  active  Sunday-school  worker,  and  is  the 
present  Superintendent  in  the  North  School.  Member 
of  the  City  Council  1873,  '74.  He  married  in  Denmark, 
January  8,  1862,  Maiy  K.  Christiansen,  daughter  of  Jens 
F.,  and  a  native  of  Denmark.  They  had  seven  children, 
Malvina,  Maiy,  Martha,  Christine,  James,  Nettie  and 
Willet.  Mr.  AVodskow  is  still  interested  in  farming, 
owning  considerable  land  near  Manti.  He  is  very  quiet 
and  unassuming  in  his  business  relations,  pref ending 
rather  to  let  his  actions  speak,  and  is  known  in  the  com- 
munity as  a  man  of  true  integrity  and  of  sterling  worth. 


1  !  /'OKKS,  EDWIN  :M.,  proprietor  of  the  Manti  Planing 
\XJ  Mill,  is  a  son  of  James  M.  and  Phebe  (Jones)  Works, 
born  in  Manti  December  28,  1861.  James  M.  Works 
was  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Utah  and  stood  high  in 
the  estimation  of  lUighani  Young  and  the  councils  of  the 
Mormon  church.  Ills  sister  ]Meriam  became  the  first 
wife  of  President  Young.  He  Avas  ordained  patriarch  in 
the  church  by  President  Young  and  when  tlie  Deseret 
telegraph  line  was  completed  from  Salt  Lake  to  Manti 
the  first  message  over  the  line  was  received  by  him  from 
President  Young.  He  tilled  a  mission  to  England,  cross- 
ing the  plains  both  Avays  on  foot.  He  married  in  Salt 
Lake  and  afterward  located  in  Manti,  Avhere  he  was  quite 
prominent  in  church  matters,  and  died  July  24,  1889. 
Phebe  (Jones)  Works  came  across  the  plains  in  1857  in 
a  hand  cart  company  and  is  still  living  with  Edwin  M. 

Our  subject  grew  up  in  Manti  and  picked  up  the 
trade  of  a  carpenter.  In  1891  he  built  the  Manti  planing 
mill,  where  he  is  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of     sash. 


200  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

doors,  blinds,  mouldings,  etc.  In  1S95  he  bought  a  saw- 
mill in  Six-Mile  canyon  about  fifteen  miles  from  Manti. 
He  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  November  23,  1882,  to  Mar- 
garet M.,  daughter  of  Christian  and  Annie  M.  Munk,  who 
died  May  12,  1889,  leaving  him  four  children,  Edwin  P., 
James  E.,  Jesse  C.  and  Margaret  (deceased.)  He  again 
married  March  27,  1890  to  Hannah  O.  Munk,  sister  of 
his  first  wife.  One  child,  Edmund  M.,  died  aged  five 
days.  She  died  January  19,  1891.  Mr.  Works  is  a  pub- 
lic-spirited, enterprising  man  of  the  kind  who  build  up  a 
town.  He  stands  well  in  the  estimation  of  his  fellow  citi- 
zens, who  have  thrice  elected  him  to  represent  them  in 
the  City  Council. 


MANTI   PUBLIC  SCHOOL. 


MT.     PLEASANT    PUBLIC    SCHOOL. 


MOUNT   PLEASANT. 


rnoUNT  PLEASANT,  as  the  name  implies,  is  situ- 
I  I  I  ated  upon  a  pleasant  elevation,  near  the  center 
of  the  famous  '"Granaiy  of  Utah,"  twenty-five  miles 
north  of  Manti  and  100  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake  City. 
The  site  was  selected  by  the  early  jjioneers  of  Sanpete 
county  as  the  most  delightful  and  commanding  location 
for  an  important  commercial  metropolis,  and  its  rapid 
growth  and  permanent  development  fully  demons^trates 
that  the  locators  were  not  deceived.  In  the  early  spring 
of  1852  a  company  of  the  veterans  of  '49,  from  Manti, 
camped  upon  the  ground  now  included  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
and  began  the  building  of  the  ''Queen  City  of  Sanpete." 
The  colonists  were  commanded  by  Madison  D.  Hamil- 
ton, who  erected  a  saw  mill  and  began  to  cut  lumber 
for  building  houses.  In  1853  the  Indians  attacked  the 
colonists  and  drove  away  some  cattle.  The  colony  was 
reinforced  by  militiamen  from  Utah  county  and  assisted 
in  harvesting  their  grain,  when  the  settlement  was 
abandoned. 

The  Indians  regarded  this  retreat  as  an  indication 
of  weakness  on  the  part  of  their  white  foes,  and  rejoiced 
that  the  waters  of  Pleasant  creek  and  the  nutritious 
grasses  of  the  broad  meadows  were  to  remain  undis- 
turbed as  the  favorite  hunting  ground  of  the  redmen  of 
Central  Utah.  But,  such  a  site  could  not  be  overlooked 
by  men  in  search  of  homes  and  desirous  of  founding  a 
city  where  the  natural  facilities  were  everywhere  pres- 
ent. Here  the  climate  is  tempered  by  the  altitude  and 
pleasant  breeze,  never  too  hot  in  summer  nor  too  cold  in 


204  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

winter,  and  the  miasmatic  genns  of  disease  cannot  exist 
in  the  pure  ozonifled  atmosphere.  The  cool  mountain 
water,  fresh  from  the  glaciers  of  perpetual  snow,  con- 
tain none  of  the  impurities  of  less  favored  sub-humid 
lands,  and  the  clear,  bracing  atmosphere  make  of  life  a 
continued  round  of  pleasure  and  add  to  the  cherished 
hope  of  longevity  a  thousand  dazzling  charms.  When, 
therefore,  the  Indians  wei'e  partially  conquered  and 
peace  promised,  a  second  attempt  was  made  to  colonize 
the  chosen  land  of  Mt.  Pleasant. 

In  the  spring  of  1859  a  company  was  made  up  at 
Ephraim  to  colonize  on  Pleasant  creek,  and  articles  were 
signed  by  the  boldest  of  the  pioneers.  Among  those  who 
possessed  the  courage  necessaiy  to  enter  upon  the  for- 
bidden land  of  the  savages,  were  A\'.  S,  Seely,  Isaac 
Allred,  David  Jones,  Nelson  Tidweil,  John  Meynck  and 
James  Ivie,  wlio  Avith  their  families,  led  the  i^ioneers  to 
this  chosen  valley,  and  proceeded  to  erect  houses  upon 
the  spot  where  the  Indians  had  burned  the  first  settle- 
ment. They  worked  by  day  and  paced  the  sentinel  posts 
by  night,  keeping  a  constant  watch  against  an  attack 
from  the  savages.  Co-operation  in  its  perfect  simplicity 
marked  every  move  and  individual  gains  Avere  forgotten 
in  the  combined  effort  at  colonial  comfort  and  general 
prosperity.  The  waters  of  Pleasant  creek  were  trained 
upon  the  fields  through  union  ditches,  and  the  exceeding 
fertility  of  motlier  earth  produced  an  abundance  of  veg- 
etables, cereals  and  grasses  for  nourishing  and  sustain- 
ing the  colonists  and  their  domestic  animals. 

A  fort  was  constructed  the  first  season,  and  the 
colony  was  reinforced  by  Cyrus  H.  AVheelock  and  a  com- 
pany from  the  northern  counties.  Schools  and  theatrical 
companies  were  organized  and  life  was  made  as  pleasant 
as  possible  during  tlie  long,  severe  winters,  when  cold 
and  hunger  supplemented  by  continued  fear  of  an  Indian 


HON.    FERDINAND    ERICKSEN. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HISTORi'   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  205 

uijrising  were  perpetual  dangers  the  memories  of  which 
can  never  be  forgotten  by  the  most  youthful  paiiici- 
pants.  The  brave  men  and  noble  women  composing  the 
small  band  of  original  colonists  had  become  inured  to 
trials  and  were  not  strangers  to  poverty,  hence  entered 
upon  their  duties  with  a  determination  to  succeed  and  an 
earnest  desire  to  overcome  all  obstacles  in  the  interest 
of  homes  and  families.  A  miniature  saw  mill  was  erect- 
ed and  logs  cut  for  flooring  and  roofing  for  some  houses, 
while  the  adobe  and  dugout,  with  earth  and  thatched 
roofs  served  as  Avell  as  the  modem  brick  mansion.  The 
grain  was  gi-ound  in  a  small  mill  run  by  water  power 
and  all  had  the  staff  of  life. 

Mt.  Pleasant  Avas  the  battle  ground  for  which  the 
Indians  contended,  and  many  engagements  were  had  be- 
tween the  militia  and  savages  during  the  exciting  years 
of  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Men  were  ready  for  any  emerg- 
ency and  stood  as  the  famous  minute  men  of  1776,  sub- 
ject to  militarj^  orders  day  or  night,  to  defend  the  colon- 
ists of  Sanpete  county.  The  city  was  incorporated  Feb- 
ruary 20,  1868,  and  began  to  assume  some  importance, 
Arhich  however,  was  checked  and  its  powers  limited  by 
the  continuation  of  the  war  until  1872,  when  Gen,  Mor- 
row made  a  treaty  with  the  Utes,  at  this  place,  and  peace 
was  restored.  Since  then  the  work  of  advancement  has 
been  phenomenal,  and  the  accumulation  of  wealth  has 
increased  at  a  most  remarkable  pace.  The  many  natural 
advantages  have  been  utilized  and  health,  wealth  and 
prosperity  crowned  the  efforts  of  those  zealous  patriots, 
who  transformed  the  desert  into  peaceful  homes,  beauti- 
ful fields  and  fruitful  orchards,  supplying  nearly  3000 
inhabitants  with  the  necessities  and  comforts  of  life. 

The  municipal  affairs  have  been  wisely  and  econ- 
omically administered  by  competent  men  who  have  la- 
bored incessantly  to  make  of  the  city  what  her  inhabi- 


206  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

tants  justly  claim,  "The  Queen  City  of  Sanpete."  The 
city  has  clean,  broad  streets;  excellent  water  for  culi- 
nary, domestic  and  irrigation  pui'poses;  splendid  power 
for  mills  and  factories;  fine  school  houses  and  well-in- 
formed teachers;  beautiful  lawns  and  prolific  orchards 
and  gardens;  elegant  mansions,  the  homes  of  wealthy 
and  energetic  citizens;  perfect  electric  light  system;  en- 
ttrprising  and  public-spirited  business  men,  conducting 
complete  mercantile  houses;  modern  and  well-equipped 
roller  mills;  first  class  hotels;  well  conducted  newspa- 
per; solid  and  reliable  banking  institution;  best  market 
and  mail  facilities,  furnished  by  a  modern  railway;  well 
regulated  lodges,  representing  the  most  prominent  fra- 
ternal organizations;  capable  and  competent  attorneys, 
physicians  and  professional  men;  good  churches  and 
auxiliary  societies;  and  all  that  goes  to  make  up  a  com- 
mercial metropolis  of  a  county  like  Sanpete. 

Irrigation  being  the  first  and  most  important  invest- 
nsent  in  making  a  colony  in  the  arid  western  section  of 
America,  was  not  overlooked  in  colonizing  Mt.  Pleasant. 
Tlie  lands  were  apportioned  and  afterward  entered  as 
homesteads,  and  water  was  supplied  by  appropriations 
from  Pleasant  creek.  The  municipal  authorities  took  the 
responsibility  of  controlling  and  distributing  the  water, 
Y.hich  was  done  at  a  nominal  annual  expense  of  only 
ten  cents  an  acre  in  the  field  and  twenty-five  cents  for  a 
similar  area  within  the  corporate  limits  of  the  city.  Act- 
ing under  the  general  Territorial  law  concerning  cor- 
porations, passed  in  1884,  the  water  owners  have  since 
formed  different  incorporated  companies  to  protect  indi- 
vidual rights  and  control  the  water  sources  of  the  sup- 
ply. The  capital  stock  of  five  irrigation  companies  in 
which  the  citizens  of  Mt.  Pleasant  are  interested  aggre- 
gate about  |100,000,  divided  among  the  farmers. 

The  Pleasant  Creek  Irrigation  company  was  incor- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  207 

porated  April  18,  1891,  with  a  capital  stock  of  |30,000. 
The  Twin  Creek  Irrigation  company,  with  a  capitaliza- 
tion of  |19,000,  was  incorporated  on  the  same  day,  April 
:IS,  1891.  The  Moroni  and  Mt.  Pleasant  Irrigating  Ditch 
company,  with  headquarters  at  Moroni,  but  holding 
much  stock  of  and  furnishing  water  for  Mt.  Pleasant 
people,  was  incorporated  June  20,  1893,  with  a  capital 
stock  of  130,000.  The  Coal  Fork  Ditch  Irrigating  com- 
pany, with  a  capital  stock  of  |1400,  was  incorporated 
June  28,  1893.  On  Februaiy  6,  1896,  the  Cedar  Creek 
Reservoir  company,  with  a  capital  of  |15,000,  was  incor- 
porated. These  companies  are  directed  by  some  of  the 
representative  citizens  and  land  owners,  and  the  finan- 
cial affairs  are  therefore  well  handled  and  the  expenses 
made  as  low  as  economical  methods  will  permit.  Over 
10,000  acres  are  under  cultivation  from  these  ditches  and 
abundant  crops  are  harvested. 

The  co-operative  method  of  doing  business  entered 
all  the  channels  of  trade,  and  in  1867  a  co-op  store  was 
started,  with  a  capital  stock  of  |700.  This  institution 
flourished  for  years  under  the  able  direction  of  such  men 
as  W.  S.  Seeley,  A.  Madsen  and  C.  N.  Lund.  From  a 
small  log  hut  the  institution  increased  to  an  elegant  bus- 
iness block,  where  a  half  dozen  salesmen  were  kept  busy 
in  attending  to  the  wants  of  customers.  The  mercantile 
business  proving  so  successful,  many  individuals  and  in- 
corporated concerns  entered  the  field,  and  today  Mt. 
IMeasant  has  more  first-class  general  stores  than  any  city 
of  similar  size  in  the  State  of  Utah,  Nor  has  the  in- 
crease in  trade  been  confined  to  general  stores,  but  has 
extended  to  all  lines  of  business  that  a  live,  bustling  city 
of  3000  people  could  reasonably  demand.  The  air  of  bus- 
iness prosperity  permeates  the  entire  municipality  and 
enterprise  is  a  noted  characteristic  of  the  people. 

An  index  to  the  prosperity  of  a  city  is  always  shown 


208  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

ID  the  banking  institutions,  and  when  capitalists  locate 
in  Mt.  Pleasant  they  find  a  solid  financial  depository  in 
the  Mt.  Pleasant  Commercial  and  Savings  Bank.  This 
company  was  incorporated  in  1892  with  a  capital  stock 
of  $50,000.  The  depositors  have  steadily  increased  until 
tliey  number  hundreds,  a  good  surplus  is  held  in  the 
vaults  and  the  assets  are  most  satisfactoiy  to  stockhold- 
ers and  patrons.  The  directors  are  some  of  the  most 
representative  and  enterprising  citizens,  and  give  the 
bank  a  rating  for  industry  and  accumulation  when  their 
names  are  coupled  with  its  management.  The  officers 
are  N.  S.  Neilson,  president;  F.  C.  Jensen,  vice  president; 
O.  F.  Wall,  cashier.  Board  of  directors  consists  of  N.  S. 
Neilson,  Ferdinand  Ericksen,  A.  S.  Nilson,  J.  E.  Jen- 
nings, F.  (\  J(aisen,  B.  Anderson,  J.  F.  Jensen,  N.  P.  Neil- 
son and  Olof  Bosenlof. 

The  Mt.  Pleasant  Wool  aud  Live  Stock  Commission 
company,  was  incorporated  in  1893,  and  has  some  of  the 
leading  citizens  and  woolgrowers  of  the  county  as  stock- 
h(ilders.  The  company  has  handled  immense  quantities 
of  wool  and  sheepmen's  supplies,  bringing  into  Mt.  Pleas- 
ant and  Sanpete  county  thousands  of  dollars.  The  prime 
mo^'ers  aud  directorate  were  N.  S.  Nielson,  J.  H.  Seely, 
F.  C.  Jensen,  James  Larsen,  A.  S.  Nielson,  B.  Whitaker 
and  W.  D.  Candland.  Shipments  of  wool  are  made  di- 
rect to  St.  Louis  markets  and  the  best  prices  are  ob- 
tained for  customers.  A  large  frame  warehouse  on  the 
line  of  the  Bio  Grande  Western  railroad,  erectd  by  the 
company,  is  an  indication  of  the  prosperity  which  has 
followed  its  organization  and  wise  management.  The 
present  officials  are:  N.  S.  Nielson,  president;  J.  H.  See- 
ly, vice  president;  F.  C.  Jensen,  secretary. 

Another  equally  representative  and  important  wool 
shipping  concern  is  the  Union  Wool  and  Live  Stock 
Commission  company,  organized  after  the  Mt.  Pleasant 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  209 

eompanY.  This  company  handles  all  that  is  implied  in 
its  name,  with  perfect  satisfaction  to  its  customers  and 
stockholders.  The  concern  is  composed  of  reliable  bus- 
iness men,  interested  in  the  success  of  the  Queen  City  as 
the  commercial  center  of  Central  Utah.  The  officers  and 
directors  are:  Andrew  Madsen,  president;  X.  P.  Neil- 
son,  vice  president;  Xeal  M.  Madsen,  secrtary,  with  J. 
D.  Page,  Simon  T.  Beck  and  A.  J.  Aagard.  This  com- 
pany is  not  local  in  its  dealings  nor  its  official  directory, 
but  extends  its  business  operations  over  Sanpete  county 
and  throughout  Central  and  Southern  Utah. 

One  of  the  most  prominent  financial  institutions 
characteristic  of  the  enterprise  of  Mt.  Pleasant  citizens 
is  the  Sanpete  County  Co-op,  a  mercantile  establishment 
of  large  dimensions,  having  probably  the  gTeatest  vol- 
ume of  business  of  any  similar  firm  in  the  county.  This 
company  began  a  few  years  ago  with  small  capital  in  a 
verv'  insignificant  building  compared  to  the  present  com- 
modious structure.  The  affairs  have  been  so  wisely  and 
economically  handled  that  the  business  has  grown  to 
enormous  proportions.  From  one  clerk  in  a  little  room 
it  has  increased  until  a  half  dozen  men  are  engaged  in 
transacting  the  business.  The  capital  employed  is  $15,- 
000,  and  a  yearly  aggregate  of  $20,000  constitute  the 
sales.  The  present  officials  are:  X.  S.,  A.  S.  and  H.  S. 
Nilson,  August  Wall,  S.  C.  Wall  and  C.  G.  Bjelke. 

When  the  railroad  connected  this  city  with  the  com- 
mercial world  and  new  conditions  prevailed  in  the  gen- 
eral financial  affairs  of  the  municipality,  several  of  the 
prominent  citizens  conceived  the  idea  of  lighting  the 
streets,  business  blocks  and  dwelling  houses  with  elec- 
tricity. The  proposition«met  with  a  favorabl  considera- 
tion and  the  work  was  completed  by  a  company  of  finan- 
ciers composing  the  representative  men  of  the  place. 
Electric  lights  adorn  the  principal  street  crossings  and 


210  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY, 

illuminate  the  chief  dwellings,  business  blocks  and  pub- 
lic places.  The  official  directory  of  this  company  is  as 
'follows:  E.  Anderson,  president;  Peter  Matson,  secre- 
tary. 

The  manufacture  of  furniture  was  begun  several 
years  ago  by  F.  C.  Jensen,  who  conducted  a  well  ap- 
jiointed  furniture  store  until  1898,  when  a  company  was 
organized  to  continue  the  business  which  he  had  success- 
fully built  up.  The  organization  is  known  as  the  Consol- 
idated Furniture  company,  carrying  a  large  stock  of  se- 
lected household  goods  and  doing  a  large  and  profitable 
business.  F.  C.  Jensen  is  president  of  the  company  and 
F.  Clark,  secretary  and  treasurer. 

The  Union  Mercantile  company  is  a  prominent  con- 
cern, which  in  connection  with  dealing  in  general  mer- 
chandise, conducts  the  Mt.  Pleasant  creamery.  This  firm 
does  an  extensive  businss  at  home  and  abroad.  The 
Queen  City  butter  and  cheese  commands  first  class 
I)rices  wherever  exhibited.  Ole  Hansen  manages  the 
ereamei-y  and  Neal  M.  Madsen  the  store,  of  which  Peter 
Matson  is  secretaiy  and  treasurer. 

Some  of  the  more  prominent  men  of  this  city  have 
been  interested  in  mining  in  the  several  important  dis- 
tricts of  Utah  and  Nevada,  and  many  have  engaged  in 
former  days  in  freighting  produce  to  the  camps.  One 
company  recently  organized  here  is  known  as  the  Modern 
Mining  and  Milling  company,  which  operates  at  Cherry 
Creek,  Nevada.  The  plan  is  to  work  the  tailings  of  old 
mines  and  extract  the  ore  lost  by  all  processes,  and  so 
far  the  work  has  been  successful.  James  F.  Jensen  is 
president  of  the  company,  and  Jonas  Erickson  is  man- 
ager. They  with  many  others  are  interested  in  proper- 
ties in  the  Blue  mountains  and  elsewhere  and  propose 
developing  some  rich  claims,  thereby  adding  to  the 
wealth  of  this  city.     Mining  has  not  been  prosecuted  in 


k 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  211 

the  vicinity  of  this  city  very  successfully,  although  the 
coal  outcroppings  show  immense  deposits  of  a  fine  qual- 
ity of  fuel  Avithin  a  few  miles  of  town. 

Being  located  in  the  center  of  Utali's  granaiy,  Mt. 
Pleasant  is  justly  celebrated  for  the  excellt^nt  quality  of 
flour  produced  by  her  modern  mills.  The  grain  is  grown 
in  fertile  fields,  at  an  altitude  of  ovei'  6,000  feet,  and  by 
the  practical  application,  of  scientific  irrigatioin  the  best 
wheat  is  produced.  With  thorough  millers,  improved 
machinery  and  all  the  necessary  requi.siteis  for  manufac- 
turing, none  but  the  very  best  flour  is  placed  upon  the 
market.  The  Mt.  Pleasant  Mill  Company,  with  N.  S. 
Neil  son,  president;  Vi.  D,  Candland,  secretary,  and  L.  J. 
Jor(i,a.n,  treasurer,  is  one  of  the  representative  concerns 
of  the  city,  and  manufactures  all  kinds  of  mill  products, 
besides  giving  a  local  cash  market  for  wheat.  The  Qiieen 
City  Eoller  iMill  Company  is  an  equally  important  and 
valuable  business  fiiin,  consisting  of  the  following  repre- 
sentative officials:  John  H.  Seely,  L.  J.  Jordan,  John  F. 
Fechsei',  manager. 

The  almost  inexhaustible  coal  fields  lying  within  a 
fev^'  miles  of  this  cit}'  liave  been  partly  develoijed  and  be- 
fore many  years  the  supply  Avill  exceed  the"  local  demand 
and  make  of  Mt.  lUeasant  an  impoi'tant  coal  shipping 
point.  With  sufficient  capital  for  development,  there  is 
no  doul)t  that  large  deposits  of  first-class  coal  could  be 
uncovered  Avithin  sight  of  the  city.  This  would  cheapein 
fuel,  which  is  at  present  commanding  most  extraordinary 
low  prices,  and  the  maiiufacturing  plants  for  which  the 
natural  surroundings  admirably  fit  this  city,  could  be 
readil^^  introduced.  An  abundant  water  power  is  already 
obtainable  through  the  efforts  of  municipal  authorities 
in  locating  i^seiwoir  sites  and  increasing  the  supply  of 
Pleasant  Creek.     The  present  manufacturing  and  power 


212  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

concerns,  consisting  of  saw  and  grist  mills,  creamery, 
electric  light  and  flouring  mills,  do  not  exhaust  the  nat- 
ural power,  Avhich  could  be  increased  many  fold  if  neces- 
sary. 

Mt.  Pleasant  is  located  near  the  primitive  forests  of 
the  Wasatch  mountains  and  numerous  sawmills  are  util- 
ized in  cutting  timber  for  domestic  and  export  purposes. 
In  former  days  before  the  laws  were  so  strict  and  rigidly 
enforced  against  timber  cutting,  no  less  than  a  score  of 
mills  were  kept  cutting  continuously  during  the  summer 
season  in  manufacturing  lumber,  lath,  shingles  and  gen- 
eral building  timbers.  Many  citizens  find  employment  in 
logging  and  hauling  timbers  to  the  mills  and  the  lumber 
and  finished  product  to  the  home  market.  The  numerous 
elegant  mansions  and  commodious  business  blocks  have 
been  constructed  of  home  matei'ial  and  are  perpetual 
monuments  to  the  policy  of  Utah  colonists  in  utilizing 
home  resources  and  employing  home  laborers.  Although 
the  present  city  has  been  erected  from  native  forests,  the 
area  is  practically  undiminished  and  the  natural  water- 
sheds remain  to  protect  the  winter  snows  against  a  time 
of  necessity  for  irrigating  the  fields  of  the  valley. 

The  thrifty  and  industrious  people  of  Mt.  Pleasant 
are  chiefly  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits,  having  over 
10,000  aci°es  of  land  under  cultivation,  and  raising  grain, 
hay  and  potatoes.  In  early  days  the  farms  were  practi- 
cally one  co-operative  field,  but  during  the  past  few  years 
individual  holdings  have  been  fenced  and  many  small 
areas  are  devoted  to  moder-n  intensive  cultivation,  yield- 
ing immense  returns.  Fruitgrowing  and  gardening  were 
neglected  for  many  years,  under  the  delusion  that  the 
climate  was  not  suited  to  general  horticulture,  but  the 
city  is  nov^-  filled  with  prolific  trees  and  vines  and  well- 
tilled  and  profitable  gardens.    Bee-keeping  has  naturally 


JOHN  H.   SEELY, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  213 

followed  in  the  planting  of  fruit  trees  and  the  annual 
honey  product  ag-gTegates  thousands  of  pounds.  Domes- 
tic fowls  are  kept  on  e^ery  fann  and  the  agrdcultural  in- 
dependence and  prosperity  is  everywhere  yisible. 

The  newspaper  business  in  Mt.  Pleasant  is  well  rep- 
resented in  the  Pyramid,  a  weekly  publication,  issued 
eyery  Thursday  by  the  Pyramid  Publishing  Company, 
under  the  management  of  J.  M.  Boyden.  This  venture 
was  started  by  A.  B.  Williams  in  November,  1890,  and 
has  continued  to  increase  in  usefulness  as  a  public  edu- 
cator since  the  first  issue  appeared.  It  is  a  non-partisan, 
strictly  local  newspaper  and  devoted  to  the  upbuilding 
of  the  Queen  City  and  the  county  of  Sanpete.  The  Pyra- 
mid is  deserving  of  local  patronage  and  is  an  index  to 
the  push,  vim  and  entei'prise  of  the  business  interests  of 
the  city.  Its  plant  is  not  extensive,  but  will  grow  with 
the  financial  development  of  the  city  and  the  amount  of 
increasing  publicity  demanded  by  the  ever  vigilant  and 
progressive  managers  of  mercantile  institutions. 

The  political  history  of  Mt.  Pleasant  differs  from 
other  settlements  of  Sanpete  county  in  that  thei'e  were 
more  Liberal  voters  previous  to  the  organization  of  the 
national  parties.  In  the  early  days  the  People's  Party 
was  practically  alone  and  candidates  elected  without 
opposition.  This  caused  the  local  Liberal  organization 
to  increase  in  numbers  and  strength  until  this  city  be- 
came the  most  prominent  Liberal  municipality  in  central 
or  southern  Utah.  In  1891  the  party  lines  were  drawn 
throughout  ITtah,  and  Mt.  Pleasant  soon  elected  Eepubli- 
can  officials.  At  the  last  Presidential  election  the  politi- 
cal situation  changetd  throughout  all  of  Utah  and  this 
city  was  no  exception.  Mt.  Pleasant  has  furnished  vari- 
ous county  and  State  officials  of  both  parties.  Hon  J  D, 
Page  ably  represented  the  county  and  city  in  the  Consti- 


214  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

tutional  Conventiou,  while  Hon.  W.  D.  Candland  served 
as  first  State  Senator  from  Sanpete.  Hons.  Ferdinand 
Ericksen,  John  Cai-ter,  James  Burns,  C.  N.  Lund  and 
others  have  represented  their  parties  in  the  capacity  of 
county  officials. 

The  people  of  Mt.  Pleasant  are  fond  of  amusements, 
and  the  opportunities  for  entertainment  are  not  lacking. 
They  have  an  excellent  brass  band  with  first-class  musi- 
cians and  a,  j^ood  orchestra,  large,  A^'ell-built  pavilions 
and  halls;  a  home  dramatic  company  composed  of  the 
brightest  and  best  talent.  The  city  has  a  reputation  far 
and  near  as  the  repi^esentative  amusement  place  of  south- 
ern TTtah.  Nor  is  this  desire  for  mingling  in  mirthfulness 
and  forgetting  the  cares  of  life  confined  to  home  patron- 
age, for  tJie  people  attend  all  State  and  general  gather- 
ings of  a  political,  religious  or  social  nature. 

In  ISOO  the  Tiio  Grande  ^Vestern  railroad  was  com- 
pleted to  3It.  Pleasant  and  this  city  put  on  the  highway 
of  commercial  pi-osperity.  New  enterprises  were  opened, 
dormant  natural  resources  developed  and  a  cash  market 
assured  for  all  products  of  the  farm  and  the  herds  and 
flocks  in  the  mouulains.  From  that  date  to  the  present 
financial  advancement  has  been  general,  new  modern 
residences  have  been  erected,  fine  mercantile  houses  con- 
structed, the  entire  city  lighted  by  electricity  and  a  per- 
fect mountain  metropolis  created.  The  shipments  of 
wool,  sheep,  cattle,  lumber  and  grain  from  this  place  to 
outside  markets  aggregate  many  trainloads  yearly  and 
the  cash  returns  divided  among  those  interested  pour 
into  the  Queen  City  a  volume  of  money  sufficient  to  main- 
tain a  city  of  double  proportions.  With  unlimited  re» 
sources  and  such  energetic  business  men  as  Mt.  Pleasant 
has,  the  future  growth  to  a  great  commercial  mart  is 
but  a  question  of  time. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  215 

Among  tlie  many  natural  facilities  for  developing 
manufacturing  industries  Mt.  Pleasant  has  excellent  clay 
for  making  brick,  tiling  and  pottery.  This  fact  has  been 
fully  demonstrated  by  the  enterprising  firm  of  Mills 
Bros.,  who  have  established  a  yard  two  miles  north  of  i  he 
city  and  are  manufacturing  first-class  brick,  whicli  finds 
a  market  in  every  town  of  Sanpete  \'alley.  The  numer- 
ous analyses  of  soil  and  sugar  beets  grown  in  the  city  and 
vicinity  proves  conclusively  that  a  sugar  factory  could 
be  run  with  certain  success  if  located  here  in  the  midst 
of  such  excellent  soil,  water  and  climate  peculiarly 
adapted  to  sugar  beet  culture.  Mt.  Pleasant  is  centrally 
located,  with  ample  railroad  facilities,  cheap  coal,  unsur- 
passed water  powe^r,  native  raw  material  of  every  de- 
scription for  conducting  a  tanneiw,  boot  and  shoe  fac- 
tory, wool  scouring  plant,  woolen  mills  and  other  fac- 
tories, using  the  products  of  ranch  and  range,  mount-ain 
and  valley. 

Mt.  Pleasant  has  always  been  noted  for  its  churches 
and  representative  religious  societies,  exerting  a  moraliz- 
ing, and  educational  influence  over  the  citizens.  The 
Latter-day  Saints  erected  a  meeting-house  and  organized 
a  ward  when  the  first  settlement  was  made,  and  have  in- 
creased with  the  growth  of  the  city  until  two  wards  are 
now  necessary.  C.  X.  Lund  and  Peter  Matson  are  the 
presiding  bishops  and  are  well  liked  by  their  respective 
wards.  Sunday  schools  are  well  conducted  by  efficiei]t 
and  earnest  officials  and  teachers.  The  Mutual  Improve- 
ment Associations,  Eelief  Society  and  other  church  aux- 
iliaries are  in  a  flourishing  condition.  Meetings  are  held 
regularly  all  the  yeai'  round  and  many  active  mission- 
aries are  away  preaching  the  gospel  in  other  lands. 
Numerous  conferences  are  held  in  this  city,  indicating 
its  importance  not  only  as  a  business  and    commercial 


216  HISTORY  or  SANPETE  COUNTY. 

center,  but  as  a  church  gathering  place  and  city  of  enter- 
tainment. 

In  1875  Eev.  D.  J.  McMillan  deliveo:«cl  the  first  Pres- 
byterian sermon  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  using  the  Liberal  Hall 
for  holding  services.  He  procured  the  use  of  the  hall  for 
a  mission  school  and  after  making  desks  and  benches, 
began  a  school  April  20,  1875,  with  thirty-five  pupils.  A 
Sunday  School  was  soon  organized  and  January  11,  1880, 
the  church  organization  was  perfected.  The  pi'esent 
societj^  has  a  good  membership,  a  house  of  worship  and 
active  pastor  in  the  person  of  Hugh  H.  McCreery.  Since 
the  organization  of  the  church  tlie  following  ministers 
have  been  assigned  to  Mt.  Pleasant:  Revs.  William  Will- 
son,  J.  H.  Kyle  (now  United  States  Senator  from  South 
Dakota),  A.  E,  C'rawford,  K.  N,  Murphy  and  H.  H.  Mc- 
Cretery.  The  Sunday  school  has  always  been  an  impor- 
tant assistant  to  the  church  and  has  an  enrollment  of 
about  seventh-five  pupils.  Miss  Ella  C  HerTon  is  the 
present  superintendent  and  performs  her  duties  in  a  most 
creditable  manner. 

The  Wasatch  Academy,  under  the  direction  of  Prof. 
G.  H.  Marshall,  now  known,  as  the  most  popular  educa- 
tional institution  in  central  Utah,  is  the;  natural  out- 
growth of  the  mission  school  established  in  1875.  This 
elegant  three-stoiy  brick  structure  was  completed  in 
1891,  and  has  since  been  most  appropriately  furnished 
with  library,  music  room,  maps,  charts  and  necessary 
equipments  for  a  modern  school.  The  academy  is  con- 
ducted  under  the  auspices  of  the  Woman's  Executive 
Committee  of  Home  Missions  of  New  York,  and  it  was 
through  their  efforts,  aided  by  energetic  citizens  of  Mt. 
Pleasant,  that  the  building  was  erected.  A  boarding 
department  is  conducted  in  connection  Avith  the  academy 
and  many  young  ladie<s  from  Utah  and  adjoining  States 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  217 

are  comfortably  located  in  this  giri's  home  evcTy  school 
yeaj". 

The  home  is  kept  by  matrons  appointed  by  the  board 
and  the  entu'e  school  equals  in  organization  and  educa- 
tional advantages  any  similai"  instituion  in  the  State. 
The  following  well-known  ladies  have  occupied  the  posi- 
tion of  matrons:  Miss  Crowell,  Mrs.  Murphy,  Miss 
Mitchell,  Mi's.  Burnett  and  Mrs.  Reed.  During  the  past 
twenty-three  years  of  success  the  following  persons  have 
been  engaged  as  teachers:  Rev.  D.  J.  McMillan,  Miss 
Snow,  H.  G.  McMillan,  Miss  Sowles,  Mrs.  Wilcox,  Misses 
Pierce,  Fishback,  Tubbs,  Stayers,  Orowell,  Leonard, 
Kyle,  Mrs.  Crawford,  Misses  Gee,  Beekman,  McNair,  Lar- 
sen,  Prof.  (^»eyer,  Misses  Osmonde,  Miller,  Mrs.  Liddle, 
Misses  Handley,  McDonald,  Prof.  I.  N.  Smith,  Misses 
Buchanan  and  Nielson,  Prof.  G.  H.  Marshall,  Misses 
Cougle,  Smith  and  Galbraith,  Misses  Hemenway,  HerTon 
and  Allison. 

In  1883  P.  A.  H.  Franklin,  a  minister  of  the  Metho- 
dist Episcopal  church  established  a  mission  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  and  began  work  among  the  Scandinavians. 
Hired  halls  were  used  for  meeting  purposes  until  1886, 
when  the  present  church  edifice  was  erected.  Rev.  R.  L. 
Steed  of  Illinois  bgan  mission  work  among  the  English- 
speaking  people  in  1889  and  in  1897  the  mission  was  con- 
solidated under  one  pastor.  The  following  ministers 
have  had  charge  of  the  mission:  P.  A.  H.  Franklin,  Mar- 
tinius  Nelson,  C.  J.  Heckner,  O.  O.  Twede,  Emil  E.  Mork, 
N.  L.  Hansen  of  the  Scandinavians  and  J.  P.  Morris  R. 
L.  Steed,  Joseph  Wilks,  Charles  McCoard,  George  P.  Mil- 
ler, G.  R.  Graff  and  James  D.  Gillilan,  the  present  incum- 
bent. Good  Sunday  schools  and  other  church  organiza- 
tions are  maintained  and  Methodism  has  flourished  as 
other  churches. 


218  HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTV. 

Mt.  Pleasant  is  the  leading  lodge  city  of  Sanpete 
county,  the  I'^presentative  societies  having  good  lodge 
rooms  and  excellent  membership  composed  of  the  promi- 
nent citizens.  The  Mt.  Pleasaint  Lodge  Ko.  20,  Indepen- 
dent Ordei''  of  Odd  Fellows,  was  organized  a.  few  year's 
ago  with  a  fair  membership,  ^^hich  has  inci'eased  until  it 
is  no\\'  one  of  the  largest  and  most  important  lodges  in 
the  county.  Regular  weekly  meetings  are  held  every 
Thursday  evening  in  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  Hall,  and  visiting 
members  are  always  welcomed.  J.  H.  Proctor  is  Xoble 
Grand  and  A.  P.  Williams  seci^ary.  Tliis  was  the  pio- 
neer lodge  of  the  county  and  until  the  organization  of 
Temple  City  Lodge  No.  23  at  Manti  had  members  located 
in  all  the  surrounding  settlements.  The  members  exer- 
cise great  care  in  selecting  new  applicants  foi'  admission, 
hence  the  order  is  composed  of  the  best  men  intefrested 
in  increasing  the  fraternal  interests  of  the  city. 

Mt.  Pleasant  Lodge  Xo.  22,  Ancient  Order  United 
Workmen,  was  organized  with  a  good  membership  a  few 
years  ago,  and  now  contains  mam^  of  the  leading  men  of 
this  city  and  neighboring  towns.  Pegnlar  meetings  are 
held  eveiy  week  on  Monday  evenings.  A.  H.  Maiben  is 
Master  Workman  and  L.  S.  Thompson  secretai-y.  This 
order  lost  an  esteemed  member  in  Sheriff  James  Buiois, 
who  was  murdered  while  perfoxming  his  duties,  and  its 
fraternal  benefits  Avere  shown  in  the  payment  of  a  $2,000 
policj'  to  his  widow.  Damascus  Lodge  Xo.  10,  Free  and 
Accejjted  Masons,  organized  in  1895,  has  regular  com- 
munications at  Masonic  Hall  on  second  and  fourth  Satur- 
days in  each  month.  H.  V.  Oassiday  is  W.  M.  and  A.  G. 
Sutheirland  secretary.  This  order  has  members  located 
throughout  the  county  and  numbers  some  of  the  most 
influential  citizens. 

Court  Queen  City  No.  8543,  Ancient  Order  Foresters 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  219 

of  Ameiica,  was  orgainized  Febniaiy  19,  1895,  with  twen- 
ty members.  The  Oom^t  flourislied  for  3j  time,  but  finally 
surrendered  its  charter.  The  membership  was  composed 
of  prominent  young  men  of  this  city  who  desired  to  co- 
operate in  the  spirit  of  fraternalism,  some  now  being 
membei's  of  other  orders.  The  first  officers  were:  H.  R. 
McGraAv,  Chief  Eanger;  A.  E.  Scott,  Sub-Chief  Kanger; 
M.  G.  Rolph,  Past  Chief  Ranger;  Arthur  Mc Arthur,  Sen- 
ior Woodward;  Brigham  Lee,  Junior  Woodward;  Daniel 
McNamara,  Senior  Beadle;  Clarence  Winters,  Junior 
Beadle;  G.  W.  Thomson,  Secretary;  Olof  Olson,  Treas- 
urer; C.  W.  Wigton,  Moroni  Seely  and  George  Brandon, 
Trustees. 

The  citizens  of  Mt.  Pleasant  have  always  been  indus- 
triously engaged  in  eyerything  tending  to  educational 
advancement  of  their  children  and  improvements  in 
their  buildings  and  the  adoption  of  modern  methods  have 
been  made  as  fast  as  circumstances  would  permit.  In 
early  days  schools  were  taught  in  small  houses,  with  few 
necessary  paraphernalia,  but  the  systems  grew  better  as 
the  people  became  more  finanacially  able  to'  invest  money 
in  larger  buildings.  The  present  elegant  and  commodious 
central  school  building  was  erected  in  1895  and  equipped 
with  all  the  modem  apparatus.  The  school  is  well  con- 
ducted under  the  direction  of  an  able  and  efficient  board 
of  trustees.  The  teachers  for  1898  are  as  follows :  D.  C. 
Jensen,  principal;  C.  W.  Sorenson,  R.  W.  Livingston,  C. 
J.  Jensen,  O.  C.  Anderson,  Lydia  Oandland  and  Jennie 
Jorgensen.  C.  N.  Lund,  Jr.,  teaches  the  Mountainville 
school. 

The  pioneers  of  Mt.  Pleasant  were  active  partici- 
pants in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  suffering  much  from  In- 
dian depredations  and  leaving  their  homes  when  duty 
demanded,  to  protect  other  settlements  in  the  county. 


220  Hisroitv  OF  hanpete  county. 

A  spirit  of  patriotism  and  lovaltv  was  instilled  in  the 
Hiinds  of  the  youths,  and  Avhen  any  militar^^  duties  have 
lieen  required  young  men  have  willingly  enlisted  in  the 
service  of  the  State  and  Nation.  This  city  had  at  one 
time  one  of  the  best  trained  and  neatest  equipped  com- 
panies of  the  National  Guard  of  Utah,  under  command 
oi  Capt.  Thomas  Braby,  and  the  cit}'  was  honored  by  the 
election  of  Major  Ferdinand  Ericksen  as  a  member  of 
the  Governor's  staff.  The  company  was  finally  disband- 
ed  on  account  of  general  apathy  of  State  officials  in  not 
making  sufficient  approi)riations  to  sustain  the  militia. 
When  President  William  McKinley  issued  a  call  for  vol- 
unteers in  the  war  Avith  Spain  for  the  independence  of 
Cuba,  several  patriots  entei-ed  tlie  service. 

On  the  evening  of  July  25,  1898,  the  citizens  of  Mt. 
Pleasant  experienced  the  first  disastrous  conffagation  in 
the  history  of  this  city.  Fire  was  discovered  about  1 
o'clock  in  the  morning  in  the  barber  shop  belonging  to 
C  E.  Hampshire.  The  fire  alann  was  sounded,  the  en- 
gine brought  out  and  scores  of  volunteers  foiined  a 
bucket  brigade,  perfoi-ming  most  heroic  deeds  of  brav- 
ery. The  buildings  were  principally  frame  and  being 
built  almost  solid,  the  fire  could  not  be  stopped  until  a 
lialf  block  of  the  business  houses  was  burned  and  a  loss 
of  nearly  |50,000  sustained  b^^  those  doing  business  in 
the  fire-swept  district.  About  one-third  of  the  loss  was 
covered  by  insurance  in  representative  companies.  An 
evidence  of  enterprise  characteristic  of  the  people,  was 
the  speed}^  work  of  rebuilding,  for  scarcely  had  the 
smoke  cleared  away  from  the  blackened  debris,  before 
contracts  were  let  for  the  construction  of  larger  and  bet- 
ter buildings  on  the  sites  where  old  ones  had  formerly 
served  their  purposes. 

A  list  of  those  whose  places  of  business  were  de- 
stroyed by  the  fire  fiend  is  given  herewith.     The  finn  of 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  .  221 

Kofford  it  Jolinsori,  one  of  the  representative  mercantile 
houses,  lost  a  stock  of  merchandise,  valued  at  |10,000, 
and  sustained  damages  on  the  building  to  the  value  of 
^2000.  The  insurance  carried  by  this  firm  amounted  to 
$3000.  Xeilson-Olsen  company  lost  merchandise  worth 
^5000,  and  had  insurance  for  |2000.  The  Equitable  Co-op 
Store  building,  loss  |5000,  insured  for  |2000.  New  York 
Cash  Store  lost  merchandise  to  the  value  of  |4000  and 
carried  insurance  for  |2000.  Maiben  &  Aldrich  had  a 
neat,  well-stocked  drug  store,  which  was  destroyed  with 
most  of  the  stock,  the  firm  losing  |3000;  insurance  car- 
ried was  11500.  M.  C.  Kroll  lost  eveiy thing,  including 
his  store  and  bakery,  with  the  building,  amounting  to 
f2000.  He  had  no  insurance.  A.  Lundberg  lost  his  den- 
tist's and  jeweler's  tools,  together  with  residence  and 
household  effects,  valued  at  |2000.  He  had  no  insurance. 
M.  G.  Kolph  lost  his  buildings,  cigar  factory  and  inter- 
est in  the  New  State  Portrait  company,  valued  at  |5000, 
upon  which  he  carried  only  flOOO  insurance.  Dr.  S.  H. 
Allen  lost  a  store  building  worth  |2000,  with  no  insur- 
ance. 

The  postoffice  was  destroyed,  the  postmaster,  John 
Ericksen,  losing  fixtures  to  the  value  of  |500.  The  safe 
held  its  contents  intact,  but  the  heat  ruined  flOO  in  post- 
age stamps.  C.  E.  Hampshire,  the  barber  in  whose  shop 
the  fire  was  first  noticed,  lost  |500,  vnth  no  insurance. 
Dr.  H.  P.  Morrey  lost  his  office  fixtures  and  professional 
instruments,  valued  at  |300,  with  no  insurance.  Dr.  C. 
McGougan  lost  dentist's  tools  and  office  furniture  to  the 
value  of  |300.  He  had  no  insurance.  J.  C.  Barton  lost 
barber  shop  and  fixtures  worth  |200,  with  no  insurance. 
Hyrum  Hansen  lost  his  shoemaker's  tools  and  a  little 
variety  stock,  valued  at  |75.  He  had  no  insurance. 
Carl  Kroll  lost  shoemaker's  outfit  worth  |50,  with  no 
insurance. 


222  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

The  Masonic,  Odd  P^ellows,  Workmen  and  Woodmen 
societies  lost  their  consolidated  hall  and  furniture,  with 
paraphernalia  and  regalia.  The  Workmen  and  Odd  Fel- 
lows carried  insurance  to  the  value  of  |450,  while  the 
other  orders  were  not  insured.  Several  individuals  and 
tirms  suffered  much  from  removing  goods  to  the  street. 
The  Consolidated  Furniture  company,  Ash  &  Co.,  The 
I'yramid  and  R.  Anderscfi  lost  more  or  less  in  damages 
sustained  from  hasty  removal  of  property.  Window 
glass  was  melted  and  broken  by  the  heat  in  buildings 
CD  the  opposite  side  of  the  street,  and  it  was  only  through 
the  bravery  and  earnest  labors  of  men  and  women  that 
many  other  business  houses  and  residences  were  not 
burned.  The  fire  resulted  in  creating  renewed  energies 
for  waterworks,  better  police  service  and  more  strict  en- 
forcement of  citv^  ordinances.  Better  buildings  are  being 
erected  and  the  burned  district  has  resumed  its  former 
air  of  business  prosperity. 

The  present  city  officials  are: 

Mayor — Ferdinand  Ericksen. 

Councillors — James  Larsen,  William  Olson,  C.  W. 
Sorensen,  George  H.  Marshall,  Rasmus  Anderson. 

Recorder — J.  C.  Jensen. 

Marshal — Joseph  Monsen. 

Treasurer — Mrs.  Candace  B.   Wilcox. 

Justice  of  the  Peace — Andrew  Neilson. 

Poundkeeper — Lars  Arnoldsen. 

Street  Supervisor — Amasa  Erecksen. 
,         Sexton — M.  F.  Rosenborg. 


PROMINENT  CITIZENS  OF  MOUNT  PLEASANT. 


QLDEICH,  MARTIN,  wool  grower,  son  of  Levi  and 
r\  Louisa,  was  born  in  Worcester,  Mass.,  December 
/  31,  1834.  Tlie  family  came  to  Utah  in  '52  and  lo- 
cated at  Pleasant  Grove.  In  the  spring  of  '59  Martin 
Avith  his  mother  and  two  sisters  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant. 
He  assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  lived  in  it  for  a 
time.  Was  an  active  minute  man  during  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  in  several  engagements  with  Indians.  He 
was  brought  up  a  farmer  and  followed  that  business  for 
several  years.  In  '88  he  engaged  in  woolgrowing  and 
has  been  very  successful.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
to  Hannah  Matson,  a  native  of  Denmark.  She  crossed 
the  plains  with  her  parents  in  a  hand  cart  company. 
They  have  seven  children:  Amasa,  Alanson,  Leonora, 
A^ictoria,  Lyman,  Orange  and  Myron.  Mr.  Aldrich  is  fol- 
lowing the  mining  business  at  present,  and  was  one  of 
the  delegates  to  the  Mining  Congress  held  in  Salt  Lake 
City.  His  son  Lyman  owns  half  interest  in  the  leading- 
drug  store  of  Mt.  Pleasant. 

n  LLEN,  SAMUEL,  retired  farmer,  son  of  William  and 
rj  Anna  Lord,  was  born  in  Eatlilfe,  Lancashire,  Eng- 
/  land,  May  29,  1829.  He  worked  at  mining  and 
farming  till  '53,  when  he  emigrated  to  Utah,  crossing 
the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  Cyrus  Wheelock, 
arriving  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  6,  1853.  Resided  in 
the  city  two  years  and  removed  to  Provo,  thence  to  Mt. 
Pleasant  in  '59,  where  he  has  followed  farming  till  '93, 
when  he  sold  out  and  retired.  Being  one  of  the  first 
settlers,  he  assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  took  part  in 
the  Black  Hawk  war.  About  '62  he  was  called  on  a 
mission  to  assist  in  settling  Circle  Valley,  where  he  went 
find  helped  build  the  town  of  Marysvale,  from  which 
they  were  driven   away  by  Indians.    His  wife  was  a 


224  HISTOKY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

widow,  Harriet  West,  with  two  children:  Elizabeth  and 
Thomas,  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  August 
15,  1854,  and  had  eight  children:  Caroline,  deceased,  w^ife 
of  James  Eeynolds;  Harriet  M.,  wife  of  A.  Winters; 
Sarah  H.,  deceased,  T\ife  of  Joseph  Seely;  Eosella  and 
Willie,  deceased,  and  Martha  A.,  wife  of  Sylvester  Bar- 
ton, and  Samuel  H.,  physician  in  Provo,  and  Mary,  wife 
of  Ben  Hansen. 

ALIMERTZ,  peter,  gardener,  was  born  in  Sweden, 
M  August  16,  1842.  At  the  age  of  12  he  learned  to  be 
f  a  musician  and  served  at  that  until  he  was  18,  then 
became  a  gardener.  In  '74  he  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  built 
a  residence  and  engaged  in  gardening  and  teaching  pu- 
pils on  the  violin.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  March 
15,  1875,  to  Maiy,  daughter  of  Andre^v  and  Martha  An- 
derson, born  in  Denmark,  September  25,  1840.  Her 
pai'ents  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '60,  being  among  the 
early  settlers. 

n^'DEBSON,  C.  W.,  woolgrower,  son  of  Nils  and 
M  Louesa,  was  born  in  Sweden,  November  12,  1843. 
/  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '53  and 
came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Guyman's 
company,  locating  in  Brigham  City.  In  '58  they  removed 
to  Ephraim,  where  his  father  was  one  of  the  first  twenty- 
two  agreeing  to  locate  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  The  family,  con- 
sisting of  parents  and  son  C.  W.,  arrived  here  in  March, 
1859,  building  a  fort  with  a  few  others.  His  father  drew 
a  twent}^  acre  tract  and  built  the  third  adobe  house  in 
town.  They  lived  there  for  nearly  thirty  years.  Father 
died  in  '85,  mother  in  '83.  He  engaged  in  farming  and 
now  has  about  165  acres.  In  company  with  Andrew 
Madsen  he  w^ent  into  the  cattle  and  sheep  business,  they 
being  in  partnership  several  years.  They  w^ere  in  the 
Union  Mercantile  Co.  business  two  years,  and  now  own 
the  large  building  and  pavilion  near  by.  He  owns  about 
3,500  sheep.  Was  Boad  Supervisor  one  year.  Assisted  in 
organizing  the  Union  Wool  and  Live-stock  Commission 
company,  in  which  he  was  a  director,  and  the  Union 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  225 

Mercantile  Company.  Was  one  of  the  originators  of  tlie 
Twin  Creek  Irrigation  Company.  His  first  wife,  whom 
he  man'iecl  in  Mt.  Pleasant  March  S,  1864,  Avas  Margaret, 
daughter  of  Jens  and  Hannah  Thompson,  born  in  Den- 
mark. They  had  one  child,  William  M.,  deceased.  Wife 
died  April  12,  1875,  and  he  married  again,  April  23,  1879, 
to  Johanna  Pearson.    They  have  one  child,  Neilson  W. 

n  NDEKSON,  O.  0.,  teacher,  fourth  grade,  Mt.  Pleasant 
M  public  schools,  son  of  C  J.  and  Louise  Larson,  was 
/  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1870.  His  father  was  quite 
a  prominent  man  in  the  Mormon  church.  He  died  Sep- 
tember 21,  1895,  mother  died  November  8,  1871.  O.  C. 
attended  the  public  schools  of  this  city  and  took  an  acad- 
emic course  in  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo.  Has  taught 
in  Mt.  Pleasant  most  all  the  time  since  graduation.  He 
also  studied  music  and  is  an  instructor  in  vocal  and  in- 
strumental music.  Is  an  active  member  of  the  Y.  M, 
M.  I.  A.  and  the  Elder's  quorum.  Was  City  Eecorder 
one  term.  Married  in  Manti  February  10,  1892,  to  An- 
nie M.,  daughter  of  Lars  and  Stena  Ericksen,  born  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  February  9,  1872.  They  have  three  children: 
Leslie  V.,  bom  July  14,  1893;  Christina  L.,  July  11,  1895, 
and  William  O.,  June  26,  1897. 

n  VEETT,  CHAELES  W.,  farmer  and  lumberman,  son 
K|  of  Juththan  and  Polly  J.,  was  born  in  Perry  county, 
/  Alabama,  July  13,  1836.  In  '52  the  family  came  to 
Utah  and  located  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  '60  they  removed 
to  Spiingville,  where  Charles  assisted  in  constructing  a 
threshing  machine,  which  he  ran  there,  and  in  the  fall 
of  '61  he  brought  it  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  served  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war  and  was  in  many  skirmishes.  His  first 
wife  was  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Ann  Coates. 
They  were  married  February  24,  1862,  and  had  nine  chil- 
dren living:  Charles  W.,  William,  John,  Frank,  James, 
Annie,  Mary,  Emma  and  Delia.  His  wife  died  April  25, 
1891,  and  he  was  married  again  October  1,  1891,  to  Em- 
ily Coates,  a  widow,  daughter  of  William  and  Elizabeth, 
born  in  Nashville,  Iowa. 


226  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

BAETON,  SYLVESTER  A.,  fanner,  son  of  John  and 
Susanna,  was  born  in  Bountiful,  Utah,  December 
25,  1852.  His  parents  came  from  Nauvoo,  111., 
about  '49,  locating  in  Bountiful;  and  when  the  settle- 
ment of  Mt.  Pleasant  w^as  made,  they  came  here,  where 
they  died  in  '87.  He  was  brought  up  a  farmer  and  now 
owns  about  forty  acres  and  a  comfortable  residence  in 
the  city.  He  is  a  stockholder  and  director  in  the  Mt. 
Pleasant  Creamery  company.  His  wife  Avas  Martha, 
daughter  of  Samuel  and  Harriet  Allen,  born  in  Eph- 
raim,  March  3,  1860.  They  were  married  in  Mt.  Pleas- 
ant, November  30,  1877,  and  have  had  nine  children: 
Sarah  A.,  Ada  A.,  Lucile  and  Hugh  M.,  living;  Samuel 
P>.,  Harriet  S.,  Perry  E.,  Marrill  A.,  and  John  S.,  de- 
ceased. 

BEAUMAN,  HAROLD  C,  general  agent,  son  of  Har- 
old C.  and  Ella,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  Septem- 
ber 20,  1863.  His  parents  emigrated  from  Denmark 
in  '62  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  they  now  re- 
side. He  worked  on  the  farm  and  attended  the  schools 
of  this  city.  In  '86  was  appointed  postmaster,  which 
position  he  held  for  six  years.  Was  City  Treasurer  four 
years.  County'  Treasurer  two  years  and  elected  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council  in  '95.  He  assisted  in  organiz- 
ing the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank.  Now  owns  a  fifty-six  acre 
farm.  Is  agent  for  the  Royal  and  Continental  Fire  In- 
surance companies,  and  the  Pioneer  and  Davis  county 
nurseries.  Also  loans  money.  Was  married  in  Mt. 
Pleasant,  September  20,  1892,  to  Anne,  daughter  of 
Henry  and  Kate  De  Graff,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City,  Sep- 
tember 30,  1870.  They  have  had  two  dhildren:  Harold 
W.,  born  Februarv  3,  1894,  died  September  22,  1894,  and 
Ruth  F.,  born  October  15,  1895. 

BECK,   HANS   C.    H.,    farmer,   son   of   Peter   H.    and 
Maria,  was  born  in  Denmark,  May  12,  1839.     The 
family  came  to  Utah  in  '54,  locating  at  Ephraim, 
AA'here  he  took  part  in  the  Walker  war  as  a  Lieutenant, 
and  assisted  in  building  the  fort.     His  father  removed 
to    Kansas,    thence   to   Wisconsin,    where   he   died,    his 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  227 

mother  dying  in  Kansas.  He  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  April 
12,  1859,  and  built  the  first  house  in  the  town,  one  block 
south  and  two  blocks  east  of  the  bank;  also  assisted  in 
building  the  fort.  In  '65  he  was  called  on  a  mission  to 
help  build  up  Circle  Valley,  where  he  remained  two 
J  ears,  when  Indians  broke  up  the  settlement  and  he  re- 
turned. In  '72  he  moved  to  what  is  now  Chester,  and 
built  the  first  house  there.  He  was  president  of  the 
Chester  Irrigation  company.  He  returned  to  this  city 
in  1889  and  erected  his  present  nice  residence.  His  wife, 
whom  he  married  in  Ephraim,  was  Maria  Easmussen. 
They  had  five  children:  Joseph,  Mena,  Frederick  M.,  Ish- 
iiiael  and  Carrie.    She  died  in  Chester,  July  7,  1888. 

Second  Tvife  was  Mary  Olsen,  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  in  1858.  Their  children  are:  Andrew  M.,  Mary  I., 
Christian,  Hemian,  Olivia  and  Cecil,  living;  Myra  and 
Daniel  W.,  deceased. 

BJELKE,  CAKL  G.,  retired  shoemaker,  son  of  Niels 
and  Catherine,  was  bom  in  Sweden,  December  13, 
1823.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  shoemaker;  joined 
the  Mormon  church  in  '57  and  emigrated  to  Utah  in  '51, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  Murdock. 
After  residing  one  year  in  Salt  Lake  City^  he  came  to 
Mt.  Pleasant  in  '62,  and  worked  at  his  trade  and  on  the 
farm.  He  built  a  shop  and  did  quite  a  business,  employ- 
ing two  to  three  men  at  the  bench.  Was  one  of  the 
original  stockholders  in  the  Sanpete  County  Co-op,  one 
of  the  largest  institutions  in  the  county,  and  still  re- 
tains an  interest.  He  retired  from  the  shoe  business  in 
'89 .  His  wife  was  Maria,  daughter  of  Karl  and  Cather- 
ine Wall,  born  in  Sweden.  They  were  married  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  in  '63  and  have  three  children:  Emma,  Axtell 
and  Oscar. 

BORG,  JAMES,  harnessmaker,  of  the  firm  of  Clemen- 
sen  &  Borg,  was  born    in    Sweden    September  26, 
1852.     The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  ard 
mother  and  son  Lars  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '61.    Ir  '62 
James  and  sister  Hannah  came,  the   others   following. 


228  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Father  died  here  April  12,  1875,  mother  March  16,  1878. 
His  father  was  a  harnessmaker  and  James  learned  the 
trade.  Was  a  freighter  to  the  mining"  towns  of  ISievada 
for  several  years,  then  bought  a  small  ranch  southwest 
of  the  city,  wliere  he  lived  for  ten  years.  He  is  the  only 
one  of  the  family  left  in  this  country.  Is  a  member  of 
the  Mormon  church.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
Septembei'  21, 1882,  to  Sarah,  daughter  of  Jens  and  Chris- 
tina Jorgensen,  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  September  11,  1859. 
Her  pai'e'Uts  wei^  among  the  early  settlers  of  Mt.  Pleas- 
ant. They  have  tliree  children:  Georgiana,  born  June  22, 
1883;  Mabel  G.,  July  30, 1885,  and  Perry  K.,  May  11,  1888. 

Bl^ABY,  THOMAS,  woolgrovver,  son  of  Edwai»d  and 
Ann,  was  born  in  Sussex  count}',  England,  January 
10,  1804.  The  faiuily  came  to  Utah  in  '75,  where 
they  still  reside.  In  September,  1879,  he  came  to  Mt. 
Pleasant  with  L.  J.  Jordan;  was  with  him  five  years  as  a 
herder,  then  was  foreman  over  sheep  herders  for  John  H. 
Seely  for  six  3'ears.  After  this  he  engaged  in  business  for 
himself  and  has  been  quite  succeissful.  Is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Nephi  Woolgrowei*s'  Association.  Is  Past  Master 
of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.and  Past  Xoble  Grand  in  the  I.  O.  O. 
F.  Was  City  ]Marshal  four  yeai-s  and  precinct  Constable 
six  years.  Was  also  Captain  Company  C,  National 
Guard  of  Utah  for  three  yeai*s.  He  was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  aty  September  20,  1887,  to  Eliza,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam and  Mary  A.  Ketldington,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City 
December  14,  1800.  They  have  five  children:  Annie  E., 
Thomas  E.,  Orson  A.,  Kobeii:  R.  and  Iva  P. 

BliANDON,  WILFORD  W.,  farmer,  son  of  George  W. 
and  Keziah  Fowler,  was  bom  in  Henry  county,  Ten- 
nessee, July  10,  1837.  The-  family  joined  the  Mor- 
mon church  about  1834,  aftei*wards  removing  to  Hancock 
county,  Illinois,  i^siding  thei^  till  the  Mormons  were 
driven  out,  thence  to  Kanesville  and  in  '52  mother,  then  a 
widow,  and  seven,  childrem  came  to  Utah  in  Capt.  Henry 
Miller's  company  and  located  at  Prove.  They  removed 
to  Centerville  and  motlier  finallv  became  a  resident  of 


JAMES  LARSEN. 
MT.  PLEASANT. 


i 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  229 

Salt  Lake  City,  where  she  now  lives.  Wilford  went  out 
to  meet  Johnston's  army  when  it  came  to  Utah,  worked 
one  year  at  Fort  Bridger  and  came  to  Pleasant  Grove, 
where  he  resided  till  '61,  when  he  removed  to  Mt.  Pleas- 
ant and  assisted  in  building-  the  second  fort.  Was  through 
the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  one  of  the  minutemen  under 
Col.  Ivie,  and  was  in  two  engagements  with  Indians.  He 
bought  a  small  farm  and  now  owns  fourteen  acres  and  a 
residence  in  the  city.  Was  engaged  many  years  in  get- 
ting out  timber  from  the  canyons;  served  as  City  Marshal 
and  was  deputy  United  States  MacPshal  two  years.  W^as 
married  in  Pleasant  Grove  to  Margaretta,  daughter  of 
Elislia  and  Annie  Pickel  Wilcox.  They  have  eight  living 
children:  Annie,  Keziah,  Wilford  W.,  Elisha,  George, 
Thomas,  Miner  and  Eveline. 

BKOWK,  HANS  J.,  farmer,  son  of  George  and  Maiy, 
was  born  in  Denmark  July  1,  1838.  His  father  died 
in  Detnmark  and  with  his  mother  he  emigrated  to 
Utah  in  '62,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under 
Capt.  Murdock,  locating  at  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  threshed 
grain  with  a  Hail  in  the  winters  and  made  adobes  in  sum- 
mers for  several  yeairs,  finally  buying  a  farm,  now  owning 
about  100  acres.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Fairvie^^  Co-op 
store,  the  new  rolled'  mills,  the  Co-op  Sheepherding  Insti- 
tution and  vice-president  of  the  Twin  Cl'€^ek  and  City 
Creek  Eeserv^oir  Company.  He  was  head  watermaster  for 
fifteen  yeal^s  for  City  Creek,  member  of  the  City  Council 
in  '95  and  seiwed  as  City  Marshal.  Is  one  of  the  presi- 
dents of  the  sixty-sixth  quoiiini  of  Seventies,  and  pi-esi- 
dc-nt  of  his  chuirch  district.  Was  a  traveling  elder  in  Derir 
inark  foip  four  and  a  half  years  after  joining  the  church 
in  "57  and  took  an  active  part  in  the  Indian  wars  after 
coming  here,  serving  as  Lieutenant  in  the  home  militia. 
Mr.  Brown  was  one  of  the  leading  pioneers,  taking  an 
active  part  in  building  the  fort  prior  the  Indian  war,  and 
the  different  enteiiDrises,  lending  his  seiwices  to  assist 
and  benefit  the  interests  and  welfare  of  the  city  when- 
ever it  was  necessary.  His  first  wife  was  Anna,  daughter 
of  Amelius  and  Bodel  Peterson  Nielsen,  born    in    Den- 


230  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

mark  May  20,  1839.  They  were  married  April  13,  1862, 
while  crossing  the  ocean.  The  second  wife  was  Anna  C. 
Larsen  of  Denmark.  She  has  had  eight  children:  Anna 
D.,  Hans  G.,  Eliza  C,  Elinora,  Andrew  M.  and  Joseph, 
living;  Caroline  C.  and  Mary,  deceased. 

/7JAH00N,  ANDREW  A.,  woolgTower  and  shipper,  son 
V  of  AndreA\'  Cahoon  and  Margaret  Carruth  Calioon, 
wahS  born  in  Mnn-ay  (then  called  South  Cotton- 
wood), Utah,  September  14,  1853.  His  father  was  a  bishop 
in  tlie  Mormon  church,  of  which  he  was  aai  earh'  member. 
Parents  now  reside  in  Murray.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm, 
but  at  the  age  of  18  entered  the  employ  of  Jonas  Ei'ekson 
on  stock  ranch,  then  an  extensive  cattleman,  where  he 
worked  foir  ten  years.  In  August,  1882,  he  i-emoved  to 
Mt.  Pleasant,  being  then  engaged  in  the  sheep  business 
and  lia.u<lling  about  0,000  head.  In  '91  he  sold  out  8ind 
has  since  been  much  interested  in  developing  mines  in 
various  sections  of  Utah.  The  company  with  w^hich  he 
is  connected  has  a  ten-stamf)  mill  on  the  Gold  Queen 
property  in  the  Blue  Mountain  district.  He  is  a  charter 
member  of  tlie  A.  ().  U.  \\\  and  was  school  tinistee  for 
three  yeaa^s  when  plans  Avere  selected  for  the  large  .new 
school  building.  Mariied  in  Mun-ay  February  25,  1880, 
to  Maiy  A.,  daughtci'  of  Jonas  and  Mary  Erekson,  bom 
in  Mun-ay,  November  2,  1857.  They  have  four  living  chil- 
dren: Lenard,  Shirley,  Vera  and  Hallie;  Joy,  deceased. 

/JJANDLAND,  HON.  W.  D.,  of  Mt.  Pleasajit,  is  a  son  of 
\^  David  and  Hannah  (Wright)  Candland,  born  in  Salt 
Lake  C^ty  August  22,  1858.  In  1861  the  family 
came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  our  subject  attended  the 
city  schools.  Having  his  own  way  to  malve,  he  taught 
school  for  a  time  and  also  worked,  as  surveyor  on  the  rail- 
road. He  soon  saved  money  enough  to  purchase  a  small 
band  of  sheep,  and  securing  a  few  more  on  shares,  he  em- 
barked in  business  for  himself.  He  is  naturally  a  shi'ewd 
and  capable  business  man  and  entei'pTising  citizen  and 
when  any  project  is  launched    which  helps  build  up  the 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  231 

city  tie  is  a  leader.  He  helped  organize  the  Mt.  Pleasajit 
Wool  and  Live  Stock  Oomniissiom  Company,  of  which  he 
is  a  director  and  was  for  a  time  seci-etaiy.  He  also  was 
one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Electric  Light  Company,  of 
which  he  was  a  director  and  secretaTj^  and  is  still  a  stock- 
holder. He  is  also  a  stockholder  and  secretary  in  the  Mt. 
Pleasant  Milling  Company.  In  politics  Mr.  Oandland  is 
also  a  great  worker.  He  was  one  of  those  who  early  saw 
the  old  Liberal  and  People's  parties  had  accomplished 
their  object  and  the  necessity  of  a  division  on  national 
party  lines.  He  was  the  fii*st  man  to  act  in  organizing 
the  Repnblican  party  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1891  by  making 
a  personal  canvass  of  the  city  and  was  for  many  years 
chairman  of  the  party.  Many  thought  the  action  prema- 
ture and  only  eleven  members  were  seciu'ed,  the  others 
gradually-  falling  into  line  until  the  party  is  now  in  the 
majority  and  usually  elect  their  candidates  at  the  polls. 
Mr.  C.  has  been  a  delegate  to  many  of  the  county  and 
State  conventions  and  in  the  fall  of  1890  was  elected 
Eecorder  of  Sanpete  county,  which  office  he  held  two  and 
a  half  yeai's.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City  Council  four 
years  and  was  the  fii'st  State  Senator  fix)m  Sanpete 
county,  being  elected  in  the  fall  of  1895.  He  is  a  charter 
member  of  Mt.  Pleasant  Lodge  of  A.  O.  U.  W.  When  our 
subject  was  about  18  yearsi  of  age  the  family  moved  to 
Chester,  where  he  married  February  14,  1884,  Miss  An- 
nie, daughter  of  Peter  M.  and  Christiana  (Folkman)  Peel, 
who  is  a  native  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  bom  December  5,  18G0. 
Their  children  are:  Winifred,  Eoyal,  Maggie  and  Guy. 
In  1888  jNIr.  Candland  moved  back  to  Mt.  Pleasant, 

^APTEIJ,  HON.  JOHN,  ex-Sheriff  Sanpete  county  and 
X.  ex-^Iayor  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  son  of  John  and  Ellen 
Jackson,  was  born  in  Preston,  Lancashire,  Eng- 
land, January  20,  1847.  Father  died  when  he  was  three 
weeks  old  and  the  family,  consisting  of  mother,  her 
brother  and  parents,  came  to  Utali  in  1856,  crossing  the 
plains  in  a  handcart  company  under  EdAvard  Martin. 
This  company  endured  many  hardships,  many  starving, 


232  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

John's  grandpairents  both  dying.  They  arrivied  in  Salt 
Lake  City  December,  1856,  moving  to  Pleasant  Grove, 
which  he  and  his  mother  left  in  1859  and  came  to  Mt. 
Pleasant,  his  mother  being  married  to  Bishop  AV.  IS. 
Seely.  They  wei'e  among  the  first  settlers,  living  in  a  log- 
cabin  inside  the  fort.  John  worked  at  farming  and  cabi- 
netmaking,  taking  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war 
as  one  of  the  minute  company.  At  the  age  of  IG  he  drove 
an  ox  team  to  Florence,  Neb.,  for  emigrants  and  mer- 
chandise, lie  secured  a  farm  and  followed  that  work, 
now  oAvning  lOO  acres  and  a  comfortable  residence.  In 
1880  he  pei;;formed  a  mission  to  Georgia.  Has  served  as 
Constable,  City  Marshal  and  member  of  the  City  Council. 
In  181)0  was  elected  Mayor,  serAiug  one  tenn.  Was  ap- 
pointed Sheritf  in  '91,  elected  in  '95  and  served  two  yeai'«. 
Served  as  County  Selectman  for  several  years.  His  wife 
was  Almeda  J.,  daughter  of  W.  P.  and  Urania  McArthur, 
boi'u  in  I-'t.  Madison  Octobei'  29,  1847.  They  were  mar- 
ried in  Mt.  IMeasant  ]March  10,  1808,  and  have  nine  chil- 
dren: John  P.,  Ella  ().,  Charles  B.,  Abbie  C,  Louisa, 
Ma.iw,  Autliueal,  Parlcii  an<l  Almeda  M. 

/QIUHSTKNSEN,  JACOB,  son  of  Chiistian  and  Mary, 
\  was  born  in  Denmark,  September  21,  1827.  He 
joined  the  Mormon  church  in  his  native  land 
February  30,  1853,  and  was  a,  traveling  elder  for  two 
years.  In  1857  he  emigrateil  to  the  United  States  and 
resided  in  Omaha  for  two  years,  then  crossed  the  plains 
with  his  wife,  their  one  child  dying  on  the  way,  and  lo- 
cated at  Mt.  Pleasant,  among  the  first  settlers  in  the 
fall  of  1859.  He  uoaa  owns  a  nice  fann  north  of  Mt. 
Pleasant  and  is  president  of  the  high  priests'  quonim. 
Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  a 
Captain  of  company  A,  Mt.  Pleasant  militia,  and  was  in 
several  engagements  with  Indians.  He  has  always  been 
a  prominent  man  and  much  I'espected  in  the  community. 
Was  married  in  Denmark  to  Inger  C.  Thompson,  who 
died  in  Mt.  Pleasant  May  20,  1888,  leaving  three  living 
children:  Jens  C,  Maiy  and  Thomas  ]M.,  and  three  de- 
ceased:    Thomas  C,  Jacob  and  Christian.     His  second 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  238 

wife  was  Ins^abor  Christiansen.  She  has  five  living-  cliil- 
dren:  Stena,  Christy,  Diantha,  Marie  and  Lena;  Joseph 
and  Andrew,  deceased.  The  third  wife  was  Anna  C. 
Marborg,  born  in  Sweden  March  2,  1850.  She  has  six 
living-  children:  Hannah,  John  C,  Henry,  Grace,  Sadie 
and  Hyrnm,  with  John  C.  and  Jacob,  deceased. 

iQHRISTENSEN,  J.  G.,  teacher,  son  of  Emanuel  and 
^  Minnie,  was  born  in  Denmark  February  24,  1806. 
In  1873  the  family  emigrated  to  Utah,  stopping  in 
Brigham  City,  then  removing  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where 
mother  died  Januaiy  28,  1871.  Father  died  April  8,  1898, 
83  years  of  age.  J.  G.  attended  the  district  s(:hools,  then 
entered  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo,  graduating  in  two 
years.  He  then  taught  school  in  this  city,  being  princi- 
pal of  the  Sanpete  Stake  Academy  for  several  years.  In 
May,  1896,  he  went  on  a  mission  to  Copenhagen.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  two  yeai-s  and  County  Treas- 
urer two  years.  Has  served  as  superintendent  of  the 
Sunday  school  of  Sanpete  county.  Was  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Union  Mercantile  Company,  which  he 
assisted  in  organizing.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
December  31,  1890,  to  Dorthea  M.,  daughter  of  Peter  and 
Dorthea  M.  Monson,  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  July  23,  1865. 
They  have  two  children:    Ethelinda  and  George  Q. 

/QLAKK,  FERDIKAXD,  of  the  Consolidated  Furniture 
V  Company,  son  of  Otto  C.  F.  and  Abigail  Larsen,  was 
bora  in  Denmark  Januaiy  23,  1859.  He  and  his 
mother  came  to  Utah  in  '73,  stopping  for  a  time  in  Brig- 
ham  City,  and  locating  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '73.  He  learned 
the  trade  of  painter,  which  work  he  followed  several 
years.  In  '92  the  firiu  of  Clark,  Johanson  &  Co.  was 
formed  for  handling  furniture  and  in  '95  the  name  was 
changed  to  the  present  one,  of  Avhicli  he  is  secretary, 
treasurer  and  manager.  They  carrv'  a  good  stock  of 
about  $3,000  and  do'  a  su(;cessful  business  in  furniture, 
wall  paper,  cai-pets,  paints,  oils,  glass  and  toys.  Ferdi- 
nand has  been  Citv  Ju>stice  two  terms  and  was  elected  a 


234  HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

member  of  the  City  Council  in  '95.  Is  a  Mormon  and  very 
active  in  church  work,  having  been  superintendent  of  the 
Sunday  school  two  years,  on  a  mission  in  Minnesota  one 
year  and  was  president  of  the  Young  Men's  Mutual  Im- 
provement Association  some  years  ago.  Is  one  of  the 
presidents  of  the  sixt^'-sixth  quorum  of  Seventies.  His 
wife  was  HannaJi  C,  daughter  of  James  C.  and  Harbro 
Christensen,  born  in  :Mt.  I'leasant  April  27,  18()8.  They 
were  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  October  1,  1880,  and  have 
had  eight  children:  Rosina  A.,  Otto  F.,  Daniel  W.,  Myr- 
tle and  Alonzo,  li^i.ng;  Hannah  C,  Hazel  and  Heber,  de- 
ceased. 

/^LAKK,  ORRIN,  expix?Sisman,  son  of  Joseph  and  Phy- 
\  linda  Carpenter,  was  born  in  Chautauqua  county, 
X.  Y.,  November  7,  1833.  His  parents  joined  the 
Mormon  church  in  early  days  and  lived  in  the  different 
Mormon  settlements  in  Ohio  and  Illinois.  In  '51  they  re- 
moved to  Pleasant  Grove,  Utah,  where  mother  died  in 
'54,  father  in  '67.  Orrin  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59  and 
resided  in  the  foi-t.  AA'as  active  in  the  Black  Hawk  war. 
In  '65  he  i-e^moved  to  Kanab  to  assist  in  settling  that  sec- 
tion. He  remained  there  one  year,  being  captain  of  a 
company,  and  having  many  exciting  experiences  with  the 
Indians.  Returned  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '67  and  for  many 
years  has  run  an  express  and  dray  wagon.  He  also  owns 
120  aci'^s  of  hay  land.  Was  married  in  Pleasant  Grove 
in  '59  to  Sarah  Gilson.  They  have  nine  children:  Phy lin- 
da, Joseph,  Sarah  E.,  Martha,  William,  Ella,  Bird,  An- 
netta  and  Addie. 

/QLEMENSEN,  OLE  N.,  harnessuLaker,  of  the  firm  of 
\^  Olemensen  &  Borg,  son  of  Ole  N.  and  Annie,  was 
born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  September  22,  1863,  His  par- 
ents came  here  in  1862,  father  died  August  25,  1863, 
mother  still  living.  The  family  consisted  of  parents  and 
three  sons  and  two  daughters:  George  M.,  Ole  N.  and 
Melvina  Crane,  I'esidiug  here;  Newton  E.,  Presbyterian 
minister  at  Logan,  and  Nephena,  wife  of  E.  B.  Kelsey, 


I 

I 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  235 

Salt  Lake  City.  Ole  N.  learned  the  harness  trade  at  the 
age  of  21  and  has  since  followed  it.  Was  married  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  October  25,  1893,  to  Emma,  daughter  of  David 
and  Sarah  Graham,  born  near  Tuscola,  111.,  January  19, 
1868.  They  haye  tAvo  children:  Newton  0.,  born  March 
7,  1895,  and  an  infant,  August  16,  1897. 

DAY,  GEOKGE  ^y.,  farmer,  son  of  Abraham  and  Char- 
lotte, was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  September  7,  1865. 
His  parents  were  among  the  early  members  of  the 
Monnon  church,  coming  to  Utah  in  '51  and  locating  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  in  '60.  Father  was  active  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  a  member  of  the  Mormon  Battalion,  being 
discharged  in  California,  The  father  is  living  in  Emery 
count}-.  George  has  always  resided  here.  Is  a  member 
of  the  Mormon  church  and  has  been  president  of  the 
elders'  quorum  and  counsellor  to  the  president.  Was 
married  in  Logan  Temple  November  17,  1886,  to  Eliza- 
beth E.,  daughter  of  Nathan  and  Eliza  Staker,  born  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  Februaiw  1,  1866.  They  have  had  four  chil- 
dren: Arthur  G.,  born  November  20,  1888,  died  April, 
1889;  Nathan  A.,  born  September  2,  1890;  Irvin  M.,  Sep- 
tember 26,  1892,  and  Olea,  August  18,  1894. 

EKECKSON,  JONAS  H.,  woolgrower,  son  of  Jonas 
and  Maiy  J.  Powell,  was  born  near  Murray,  Utah, 
December  31,  1853.  His  parents  came  to  Utah 
about  '49  and  his  father  was  a  man  of  considerable 
wealth.  In  1880  Jonas  entered  the  sheep  business,  hand- 
ling his  father's  flocks,  and  prospered  so  well  that  he 
soon  had  10,000  head.  He  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '82, 
and  has  since  been  prominently  identified  with  the  busi- 
ness interests  and  development  of  the  city.  Was  one  of 
the  organizers  of  Nephi  bank,  holding  the  office  of  vice- 
president,  also  interested  in  the  Nephi  Woolgrowers' 
Association,  of  which  he  was  president.  He  was  one  of 
the  largest  stockholders  in  the  organization  of  the  Mt. 
Pleasant  bank  and  has  been  a  director.  A  nice  farm  near 
the  city,  beautiful  residence  in  town  and  much  real  estate 


236  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

in  different  places  show  that  he  is  an  energetic,  enterpris- 
ing and  successful  business  man.  He  is  interested  in 
several  mines  and  is  manager  of  a  new  company  having 
a  process  for  handling  tailings  bv  Avhich  all  the  ore  in  a 
dump  is  to  be  saved.  AA'as  for  many  years  a  member  of 
the  I.  O.  O.  P.  His  wife  was  Maiy  E.,  daughter  of  James 
and  Elizabeth  A.  Winchester,  bom  in  Salt  Lake  county 
Januar}'  14,  1855.  They  wei^  married  near  Murray  Jan- 
uary 21,  1878,  and  have  had  seven  children:  Leona,  Ed- 
gar J.,  Affel  J.,  Hugh  H.  and  Leslie  H.,  living;  Jonas  A. 
and  Ruby,  deceased. 

ERICKSEN,  ALIF,  of  the  Ericksen  Meat  and  Grocery 
Co.,  son  of  Henry  and  Ingeborg,  was  born  in  Span- 
ish Fork,  Utah,  July  14,  1858.  In  '60  the  family 
removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  he  was  raised  a  farmer. 
When  Alif  began  to  work  for  himself  he  purchased  a 
farm  and  now  owns  a  nice  eighty-acre  tract.  He  was  a 
niember  of  the  City  Council  thi*ee  years  and  served  as 
County  Tax  Collector.    In  '92  he  and  brother  Henr^^  with 

C.  W.  Peterson  opened  the  jjresent  business.  The  firm 
now  consists  of  himself  and  brother  and  Ferdinand 
Ericksen.  They  have  a  fine  stock  of  fresh  and  canned 
meats,  groceries  and  provisions.  He  is  a  stockholder  in 
the  Electric  Light  company  and  Mt.  Pleasant  Roller 
Mills,  of  which  he  is  a  director.  In  '89  he  went  to  Nor- 
way on  a  two  years'  mission.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  January  5,  1882,  to  Augusta  E.,  daughter  of  Paul 
and  Elna  De'hlin,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City,  August  6,  1862. 
They  have  five  children:   Ellen  A.,  Ina  M.,  Daisy  G.,  Alif 

D.  and  Oscar  A. 

ERICKSEX,  EDWAED  A.,  farmer,  son  of  Henry  and 
Ingborg,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  the  house 
where  he  now  resides,  January  2,  1862.  He  was 
reared  to  farming  and  herding  sheep  and  was  foreman 
in  managing  a  sheep  herd  for  his  brother  for  several 
years.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  June  5,  1889,  to 
Vilate,  daughter  of  Moroni  and  Emily  Alice  Seely,  born 
in  Mt.   Pleasant,  June  2,  1873.     They  have  three  chil- 


JUSTUS    W.    SEELY. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


cn.ARISSA  J,   SEEUY. 
MT.    PLEASANT. 


k 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  23T 

dren:  Arthur  E.,  born  August  30,  1890;  Lrevar,  June  11, 
J  893,  and  Wilford  M.,  August  23,  1896. 

EEKICKSEN,  HON.  FERDINAND,  Mayor,  son  of 
Lars  and  Stena,  Avas  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  Sep- 
tember 30,  1863.  He  attended  the  district  schools 
and  took  a  two  years'  course  in  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at 
Frovo.  Taught  school  four  years  in  Mt.  Pleasant  and 
entered  the  Ann  Arbor  law  college,  studying  one  year. 
Was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Michigan,  June  5,  1890,  and 
opened  an  office  in  this  city.  Was  elected  County  Pros- 
ecuting Attorney  in  August,  1890,  and  County  Collec- 
tor in  '92.  Was  candidate  for  State  Senator  in  '94, 
but  the  ticket  was  defeated.  In  '97  he  was  elected 
Mayor,  which  position  he  now  holds.  Served  as 
cashier  of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank  from  January,  1893,  to 
July,  1895,  and  is  at  present  a  member  of  the  board  of 
directors.  Is  interested  in  the  Ericksen  Meat  and  Gro- 
cery Co.  In  '91  was  elected  Major  of  the  National  Guard 
of  Utah,  and  in  '96  appointed  Judge  Advocate,  with  the 
I'iink  of  Major,  on  Brigadier-General  Willard  Young's 
staff.  Was  appointed  a  school  trustee  in  '96,  to  fill  a 
vacancy,  and  in  '97  was  elected  to  that  position.  He  is 
an  enterprisinj??  self-made  man  and  a  representative  cit- 
i?jen. 

ERICKSEN,  HENRY,  of  Ericksen  Meat  and  Grocery 
Co.,  son  of  Henry  and  Ingabor,  was  born  in  Lehi, 
July  28,  1856.  Parents  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59, 
father  dying  here  September  15,  1864,  mother  still  living. 
He  was  brought  up  a  farmer  and  engaged  in  farming 
and  stockraising.  Was  clerk  in  the  Sanpete  County  Co-op 
store  for  two  years.  In  1889  he  opened  a  meat  market, 
Avhich  he  conducted  for  tw^o  years.  In  '97  the  present 
tirm  was  incorporated  by  Alif,  Ferdinand  and  himself. 
They  own  a  two-story  brick  and  cany  a  nice  stock  of 
groceries,  canned  goods,  fresh  and  salted  meats  and  do 
a  good  business.  Henry  owns  a  farm  of  fifty-five  acres 
ir  Chester  and  his  residence  in  the  city.  Is  a  member 
of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  and  master  workman  of  the  lodge. 
His  wife  was  Wilhelmina,  daughter  of  William  and  Mar- 
gnret  F.  Morrison,  born  in  Ephraim,   March  13,  1858. 


238  .HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  24,  1878, 
and  have  had  eight  children,  four  living  and  four  dead. 

EKICKSEN,  H.  P.,  farmer  and  cai-penter,  was  born 
in  Denmark,  November  11,  1844.  He  learned  the 
trade  of  a  carpenter  from  his  father.  The  family 
joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  to  Utah  in 
'63,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  San- 
ders, and  settled  at  Fountain  Green,  where  the  father 
died  January  11,  1864.  In  the  spring  of  '65  he  came  to 
Mt.  Pleasant  and  in  '66  removed  to  Grand  Island,  Neb., 
where  he  resided  fifteen  years.  In  '81  he  returned  to  this 
city;  purchasing  a  farm  of  120  acres  at  Chester,  and  in 
"95  erected  his  present  nice  residence  in  Mt.  Pleasant. 
His  T\ife  was  Anna  M.,  daughter  of  Ole  and  Anna  Mad- 
sen,  born  in  Denmark,  April  2,  1846.  They  were  mar- 
ried in  Mt.  Pleasant,  April  4,  1865,  and  have  two  chil- 
dren living:  Christian  and  Leonard.  Christian  married 
Anna  Jensen.  Mrs.  Ericksen's  mother  is  living,  at  the 
age  of  89  years.  Her  father  was  one  of  fourteen  buried 
in  one  grave  while  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Ohman- 
sen's  train  of  hand  carts. 

EKK^KSON,  JOHN  N.,  postmaster,  son  of  Peter  J.  and 
Christina,  was  bom  in  Mt.  Pleasant  September  20, 
1870.  His  parents  came  from  Sweden  and  located 
in  this  city,  where  father  died  in  '72,  mother  still  living. 
John  attended  the  Mt.  Pleasant  schools  and  was  a  stu- 
dent of  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Prove  tAvo'  yeai°s.  He 
taught  school  in  Indiancda  and  Mt.  Pleasant  and  was 
principal  for  one  year  at  Kedmond.  In  February,  1897, 
he  entered  the  postoffice  and  has  given  general  satisfac- 
tion. He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Queen  City  Eoller  Mills, 
owns  his  residence  in  the  city  and  has  a.n  interest  in  a 
business  bloek  om  Main  street.  Is  a,n  active  member  of 
the  IVIormon  church. 

FAKNWORTH,    GEOKGE,   son  of  Joseph    and    Mar- 
garet McBride,  wais  bom  in  Landreton   La    Nord, 
France,  January  24,  1818.   His  father  was  a  farrier 
in  the  English  army  and  he  resided  in  France,  Ii'eland 


HISTOKY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  239 

and  England,  learning  the  shoeing  trade.  He  came  to 
this  country  with  a  wife  and  child  in  '47,  locating  at  St. 
Louis,  where  mother  and  child  died,  he  coming  to  Salt 
Lake  City  by  ox  train,  arriving  July  18,  1853.  He  re- 
moved to  Pleasant  Grove  in  '55  and  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant 
in  '59,  where  he  worked  at  his  trade.  He  was  called  to 
work  as  tithing  clerk,  holding  the  position  several  years, 
then  collector  for  the  Deseret  News,  finally  had  charge 
of  the  stake  tithing  department  till  September,  1895. 
Spent  considerable  time  in  raising  funds  for  the  Manti 
Temple  and  has  given  his  time  to  genei'al  church  work. 
He  has  a  good  home,  where  he  has  resided  since  coming 
to  this  city.  His  first  wife  was  Elizabeth  Bustard,  who 
had  one  child,  both  dying  in  St.  Louis.  Second  wife  was 
Elizabeth  Hitchings,  who  had  no  childi'en.  TliiM  wife 
was  Susannah,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Ann  Coates,  born 
in  Chesterfield,  England,  December  12,  183G.  She  had 
twehe  children:  Joseph,  Hyrum,  James,  Moroni,  Ro- 
sella  A.,  Eliza  J.,  Herbert  and  William  E.,  living;  Susan- 
nah E.,  George  and  two  unnamed  infants,  dead.  Fourth 
wife  was  Mar^-  J.  Allen.  She  has  had  eight  children: 
John  W.,  Charles  H.,  Nephi,  Brigham,  Violet  and  Al- 
fred, living;  George  H.  and  unnamed  infant,  deceased. 

FEOHSER,  JOHN  F.,  miller,  son  of  John  G.  and  Maria 
Kiserker,  was  born  in  Wurtemberg,  Germany,  July 
19,  1825,  and  learned  the  trade  of  a  miller.  He  mar- 
ried in  Hamburg  Rosina  F.  Keyser.  The  family  joined 
the  Mormon  church  and  in  1853  emigrated  to  this  coun- 
try, including  the  father  and  mothier.  In  1854  they 
crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  Brown;  on 
the  way  the  wife  and  two  children  died.  The  family  re- 
sided for  a  time  in  Little  Cottonwood  and  Spanish  Fork. 
John  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  among  the  first  in  March, 
1859,  and  helped  build  the  fort.  He  soon  bought  a  small 
grist  mill,  which  he  ran  for  twelve  years.  In  company 
with  William  Randall  and  brother  he  built  a  buiT  mill, 
which  he  operated  ten  years.  He  then  assisted  in  build- 
ing the  Uppei'  mill,  which  he  managed  till  1880,  when, 
in  company  with  John    H.  Seely    and    L.  J.  Jordan,  he 


240  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

built  the  first  roller  mill  in  tbe  city,  now  ownied  by  the 
Mt.  Pleasant  Roller  Mill  Company.  Mr.  Fechser  is  a 
first-class  miller  and  has  clone  much  for  the  milling  busi- 
nessi  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  has  been  president,  treasurer 
and  director  and  is  now  manager,  assist^ed  by  his  two 
sons,  of  the  lower  mill,  which  has  a  capacity  of  fifty  bar- 
rels. He  took  an  actiye  i^ai't  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and 
has  been  a  workei'  in  the  church;  was  a  member  of  the 
fiftieth  quorum  of  Seventies  and  is  now  a  high  pi'iest. 
He  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  January  14,  1855,  Trina 
A.  Bori'osen.  He  again  married  January  2,  1866,  to  Ida 
O.  Johnson.  Their  childi'en  a.re:  Sarah,  Ida,  Josephine, 
Frederick,  Janu^s,  ^Maiin.  E.,  Elizabeth  M.,  Hyin^im  and 
Ellen. 

FBANDSEN,  KASMUS,  farmei-,  was  born  in  Dcuuiark 
Februar}^  5,  1835.  He  came  to  Utah  in  '57,  cross- 
ing the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Canute  Peter- 
son, stoi)i)iug  a  short  time  at  Epiiiaim  and  locating  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  in  '51).  Assisted  in  building  the  fort  and 
took  part  in. the  Black  Hawk  war.  He  took  up  a  farm 
and  has  been  engaged  in  farming  all  the  time.  His  first 
wife,  whom  he  maiTied  in  Salt  Lake  City,  was  Jacobina, 
daughter  of  Lars  and  Bael  Madsen.  She  died  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  in  '83,  leading  three  children:  Emma,  Johanna 
and  Julia.  Second  wife  was  Margaret  Madsen,  sister  of 
the  first.  She  ha,s  five  children:  Peter,  Erastus,  William, 
Anna  and  Louie.  ThLrd  wife  was  Christina  Larsen.  She 
has  six  childn^i:  Celia,  Louis,  Frans,  Otto,  Leonard  and 
Edna. 

/^  UNDERSEN,  JE^S,  farmer,  son  of  Gunder  E.  and 
\J  Annie  Jensen^  bom  in  Norwaj^,  September  21,  1832. 
He  was  a  sailor  and  ship  carpentei'  on  merchant 
vessels,  and  for  one  yeai*  was  on  a  man-of-war.  In  1852 
he  joined  the  Mormon  chui\.'h,  and  in  1854  came  to  Utah 
by  way  of  New  Orleans,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train 
under  Capt.  Cowley.  He  Avas  accompanied  by  his  wife, 
her  brother  and  parents.  They  settled  in  Spanish  Fork, 
and  in  January,  1860,  he  came  to  Mt,  Pleasant,  assisted 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  241 

in  buildiug  the  secoud  foil  aud  lived  iu  it.  He  bought  20 
aei'es  of  land,  ;iiid  now  owns  183  aci'es.  Took  part  iu  the 
Black  Ha^^'k  v.ai',  being  a  sergeant,  and  worked  as  a  far- 
mer and  caii^enter.  Is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Mor- 
mon church  and  head  teacher  of  his  ward.  In  1864:  he 
made  a  trip  to  the  Missouri  river  for  emigrants.  His  first 
wife,  married  iu  Norway,  was  Anna  C.  Johnson,  who  had 
two  children,  Gunnell,  Gunder  L.,  deceased.  Second 
wife  was  Maria  Petersou.  She  had  nine  children,  James 
P.,  Gunder,  Maen  C,  Annie  H.,  Maria  C,  Ereka,  Carlina, 
John  H.,  Tina  C.  aud  Charles  C,  deceased.  Wife  died  in 
1888.  Third  wife  was  Anuetta  C.  Larseu.  Fourth  wife 
was  Kersteu  M.  Xeilsen,  who  died  October  20,  1897.' 

M  AFEX,  JACOB,  shoemaker  and  farmer,  sou  of  Jacob 
jl  and  Elizabeth  Spangler,  was  boru  in  Switzerland, 
/  February  16,  1836.  He  learned  his  trade  iu  Switz- 
erland, joined  tlie  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  to  Utah 
in  18'Jl,  cirssiug  the  plains  iu  an  ox-train  under  Capt. 
Jones,  and  located  in  Payson,  whei^e  he  reumiued  three 
years.  Then  removed  to  Richfield,  and  in  1866  came  to 
Mt.  Pleasant,  where  he  followed  his  trade  three  yeai^, 
became  interested  iu  a  shoe  store,  and  now  has  a  shop 
near  his  residence.  Is  a  Avard  teacher.  Took  an  active 
part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  and  i^erformed  a  mission 
of  two  years  to  Switzerland  durtug  1883-85.  He  is  a 
stockholder  iu  the  coal  mine  in  Pleasant  valley,  which 
supplies  a  large  amount  of  fuel  consumed  iu  this  city. 
His  first  wife,  married  in  Pay  son,  September  21,  1861, 
was  Catherine,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Rosiua  Xeff,  born 
in  Switzerland,  December  27,  1835.  They  have  five  chil- 
dren, Helmiua,  Katsina,  Eosetta,  Lydia  and  Wilford. 
Second  wife  was  Lisetta  Ott.  They  have  six  children, 
William,  Lisetta,  Emile,  Pauline,  Jacob  aud  Annie. 

IJ  ANSEN,  XEILS  P.,  farmer,  was  born  in  Denmark 
jl  September  10,  1842.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church 
'  when  about  17  and  was  a  traveling  elder  for  three 
years.  In  1864  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in 
Capt.  Preston's  church  ox-train,  aud  located  iu  Mt.  Pleas- 


242  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

ant.  Was  employed  in  vaiT-Ous  occupations  for  several 
years  and  finally  bought  a  farm.  Xow  owns  thirtj'-five 
acres.  Was  maiTied  in  Nebraska  June  18,  1864,  to  Mai'ia, 
daughter  of  Hans  and  DoTtheia  Hansen,  bom  in  Den- 
mark Januaiy  16,  1839.  They  have  four  children:  Peter, 
Jo'hji,  Edwin  and  David. 

llANSEN,  OLE,  president  and  manager  Mt.  Pleasant 
M  ei'eamer}',  son  of  Peter  and  Anna,  was  born  in  Den- 
/  mark,  May  11,  1848.  The  family  came  to  Utah  in 
1855,  stox3ping  two  ^eai'^  in  Brigham  City,  thence  to  Pay- 
son,  and  in  the  spring  of  1859  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant. 
Father  assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  died  her^  in 
1864.  Mother  returned  to  the  States  and  died  in  1896. 
Ole  was  raised  on  the  farm  and  afterward  engaged  in 
freighting  produce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Ne- 
vada. He  then  worked  in  the  mines  for  several  years. 
In  October,  1892,  he  and  Barton  Bros,  opened  the  cream- 
er}' and  operated  it  until  1894,  when  the  company  was  in- 
corporated, he  being  the  manager.  He  also  owns  60 
acres  and  conducts  a  good  farm.  ^Vas  married  in  Salt 
Lake  ("ity,  October  6,  1872,  to  Annie  B.,  daughter  of 
James  and  Lena  Larsen,  born  in  Denmark,  June  18,  1854. 
They  have  three  children,  Flossie,  Alvira  and  Ernest. 

If  ASIiEli,  JOHN,  agent  for  the  Crown  Piano  Company 
jj  and  the  Bush  &  Gerts  Compau}-  for  southern  Utah, 
/  son  of  John  and  Susannah  Leeman,  was  born  in 
Switzerland  April  17,  1839.  He  was  a  merchant,  selling 
wines,  liquors  and  cigars  by  wholesale,  in  his  native 
countiT,  and  also  a  musical  instructor  and  prominent 
musician.  In  '69  he  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  and  was  made 
leader  of  the  band  and  instructor  in  music  for  pupils.  In 
'73  he  became  leader  of  the  church  choir.  He  returned 
to  his  native  countiy  on  a  mission  in  1880,  remaining  two 
years,  duT-ing  which  he  composed  the  music  for  a  German 
hymnbook,  no^^'  in  use.  Was  vice-president  of  the  Equit- 
able Co-op  store  of  Mt.  Pleasant.  Is  secretary  of  the 
high  priests'  quorum  and  an  active  churchman  and  musi- 
cian.   He  ha;s  been  selling  musical  instruments  for  many 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  243 

years,  ^^'as  married  in  Switzerland  ^Nlay  14,  1869,  to 
•Loiiesa,  dauglitei"  of  Heniy  and  Annie  Tlialnian,  born  in 
Switzerland  August  20,  1843.  Thej  had  nine  children: 
Henry,  Lydia,  Walter,  Emil  and  jNIina  O.,  living.  Second 
wife  Avas  Anna  B.  Knncler,  married  in  1885.  They  have 
one  child:     Bertha. 

iYIE,  I.  T.,  farmer,  son  of  James  K.  and  Eliza,  was.  born 
in  ^lonroe  county,  JMissouri,  May  2(),  1844.  Tlis  pa- 
rents joined  the  Monnon  church  among  the  early 
members.  In  '48  tliey  came  to  I'tah  and  located  in 
Provo,  removing  to  Ephraim  in.  '58,  and  in  '59  came  to 
Mt.  Pleasant  in  the  lirst  company.  His  father  was  one  of 
the  leading  men  and  was  appointed  president  of  Mt. 
Pleasant  by  President  Young.  He  had  the  town  sur- 
veyed and  platted  and  superintended  tlie  buiJding  of  the 
fort.  He  remoA^ed  to  Scipio,  where  he  was  killed  by  the 
Indians  in  Jane,  18()(>.  Mother  died  in  Scipio  in  '96.  I. 
T.  wa.s  reared  a  farmer  and  now  owns  eighty  acres.  He 
took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  vrar,  being  an  active  man. 
Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant;  March  29,  18G1,  to  Eliza- 
beth, daughter  of  Evan  and  Elizabeth  Evans,  born  in 
Nauvoo,  111.,  jNIay  9,  1844.  Her  mother  and  six  children 
came  \wre  in  '59  \\iih  the  firsti  settlers.  They  have  nine 
children:  Edith,  wife  of  Heniy  Allred;  Lulu,  wife  of 
Fred  Drury;  Isabella,  wife  of  Turneir  Sims;  Thomas  J., 
Evan,  Bessie,  Robert  E.,  Maurice  and  Marjory. 

JACOBSEN,  MADS  A.,  deceased,  son  of  Andrew  and 
Anna  M.,  was  born  in  Walsted,  Aalborg,  Denmark, 
September  20,  1805.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  and 
on  Jauuaiy  8,  1847,  was  married  to  Else  M.,  daughter  of 
Lauritz  and  Dorthea  Christensen,  born  in  Walsted,  Aug- 
ust 30,  1824.  They  had  nine  children,  all  born  in  Den- 
mark, Larsine,  Andrew,  Hans  P.,  Martina  and  Car'oline 
now  living.  In  '68  the  family  emigrated  in  the  "Emerald 
Isle,"  probably  the  last  sailing  vessel  canying  Mormon 
emigrants.  They  came  with  Bishop  Hans  Jensen  of 
Manti,  fitting  up  with  church  train  at  Fort  Laramie. 
Were  fonr  weeks  in  crossing  the  plains,  losing  two  chil- 
dren, Dortliea.  and  Johan  C,  on  the  trip.   Mads  located  at 


244  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Mt.  Pleasant  in  '68,  and  made  willow  baskets  and  worked 
at  his  trade — a  carpenter.  He  died  here  November  17, 
1876.  His  wife  is  still  living  with  her  son,  Hans  P.,  a 
stonemason, 

JENSEN,  ANDREW  P.,  leading-  fannei-,  son  of  Peter 
and  Hannah,  was  bom  in  Sweden  September  29, 
1837.  His  father  died  in  Sweden  and  he  came  to 
Utah  in  '50,  locating  iuMt.  Pleasant.  He  pulled  a  hand- 
cart across  the  plains  from  Florence,  Neb.,  in  Capt.  Rol- 
lins' company.  They  ran  short  of  provisions  and  suffered 
many  hardships.  Andrew  located  a  twenty-acre  form 
and  now  has  sixty  acres  and  a  tine  n^sidence  noi'th  of  the 
city,  being  a  repi'esentative  farmer.  Is  vice-president  of 
the  North  Inigation  Company.  Served  in  the  Black 
Hawk  Avai",  doing  his  share  in  guarding  against  Indians. 
Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  to  Annie  Monson,  a  na- 
tive of  Sweden.  They  have  ten  children:  Andrev.',  Hilda, 
Annie,  Selma,  Lorinda,  Ai'thur,  ]Mina,  Leoni,  Elmer  and 
Afton. 

JENSEN,  CHRISTIAN,  farmer  son  of  Jens  and  Karn, 
was  born  in  Denmark  June  7,  1825,  and  raised  on  a 
fanu.  He  was  a  workman  in  tlie  palace  of  Frederick 
A'll.  for  eleven  years,  emigrating  to  Utah  in  '56,  crossing 
the  plains  in  ox-train  under  Canute  Peterson.  He  set- 
tled at  Spanish  Fork  and  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59, 
assisting  in  building  the  fort  and  di-iving  away  Indians. 
Was  active  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in  the  Salina. 
Canyon  battle.  He  homesteaded  140  acres,  now  owning 
about  thirty  of  the  original.  Was  one  of  the  stockhold- 
ers of  the  first  Co-op  store  and  tannery.  Assisted  in 
building  the  St.  George  Temple,  and  in  '78  went  to  Den- 
mark on  a  two  years'  mission.  Has  been  a  ward  teacher 
ever  since  coming  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  In  '95  was  elected 
member  of  the  City  Council.  His  Avife  was  Karn  M.  Pet- 
erson, married  in  Spanish  Fork  October  8,  1856.  She 
died  in  this  city  November  17,  1896.  They  had  six  chil- 
dren: Hans  P.,  Agnes,  Christian,  George  and  Maria, 
living;  Joseph,  deceased. 


HON     C.    N.    LUND, 
MT.    Pl.KASANT. 


PETER    MATSON. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  245 

JENSEN,  O.  J.,  teacher  in  public  scbool  and  City  Re- 
corder,  son  of  Christian  and  Annie  M.,  boi^n  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  December  20,  1865.  His  parents  joined  the 
Mormon  chnrch  in  Denmark  and  emigrated  tO'  Mt.  Plea- 
sant in  '63,  where  mother  died  in  '77,  father  still  living; 
and  known  as  Carpenter  Jensen.  He  grew  up  in  this 
city,  working  at  the  cai"i3enter's  trade  for  several  years, 
then  engaged  in  mining  and  later  was  driving  cattle  from 
Texas  to  Wyoming.  Attended  the  schools  of  Mt.  Plea- 
sant, the  L,  D.  S.  Seminaiy  and  then  completed  a  nonnal 
course  in  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo.  In  '93  he  began 
teaching,  taught  two  years  in  the  Round  Hills  school 
near  Mt.  Pleasant,  then  accepted  a  position  in  the  district 
schools  of  this  city,  wlier-^  he  has  a,  part  of  the  fourth  and 
fifth  grades.  Is  agent  for  Edward  Strauss  &  Co.  and  the 
Amei'ican  Woolen  Mills,  handling  men's  clothing.  In 
the  fall  of  '95  was  elected  City  Recorder  and  re-elected  in 
'97,  being  a  Republican  in  politics  and  secretary  and 
treasui'er  of  the  executive  committee.  Is  superintendent 
of  the  theological  department  of  the  Sunday  school.  Also 
secretary  of  the  Elders'  quorum.  His  wife  was  Rozella, 
daughter  of  George  and  Susanna  Famw^orth,  born  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  November  15,  1868.  They  were  married  in 
Manti  Temple  October  23,  1889,  and  have  four  children: 
George  F.,  born  December  20,  1890;  Minnie  E.,  August 
12,  1892;  Maggie  Y.,  July  21,  1895,  and  Rozella  I.,  May 
29,  1897. 

JENSEN,  DANIEL  C,  priucipal  public  schools,  son  of 
John  C.  and  Annie  E.,  was  born  in  Ephraim  June  10, 
1869.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  Ephraim, 
the  Sanpete  Stake  Academy  two'  years  and  the  Deseret 
University,  where  he  completed  a  nonnal  course,  gradu- 
ating in  '92.  Came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  after  graduation  and 
accepted  the  position  of  principal,  which  he  has  since 
held.  Under  his  able  management  the  schools  have  been 
much  improved,  seven  teachers  fomnerly  being  employed, 
now  ten  are  required.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Johns- 
town IiTigatioh  Company  of  Ephraim.  Is  a  Mormon  and 
during  the  past  three  years  has  been  superintendent  of 
the  Sunday  school  and  superintendent  of  religion  classes. 


246  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

13 is  wife  was  JNTaiy  E.,  daiigJiter  of  Kisliop  L.  S.  and 
Petrea  Anderson,  born  in  Ephraim  April  30,  1870.  Tliey 
wieire  mairried  in  Manti  Temple  August  2,  1890,  and  liave 
three  children:  Cannon  L.,  born  July  8.  1891,  A^eruon, 
June  3,  1893,  and  I).  Glenn,  July  9,  1897. 

JENSEN,  FKEDEEICK  C,  furniture  dealer,  son  of 
Soren  and  Maria,  was  born  in  Odense,  Denmark,  Feb- 
ruaiw  19,  1858.  Father  died  when  he  was  3  years  old, 
and  his  mother  emigrated  to  Utah  with  four  children, 
paying  the  fares  of  many  others,  and  arrived  in  Mt.  Plea- 
sant fall  of  '62.  Fred  was  engaged  in  farming  and 
freighting  till  at  the  age  of  24,  learned  the  cabinet- 
makers trade.  In  1881  he  began  the  business  of  manu- 
facturing furniture,  but  soon  gaxe  his  attention  to  the 
business  of  a  dealer,  conducting  the  business  until  '95, 
when  the  company  was  incorporated,  with  F.  C.  Jensen 
president  and  F.  Clark  secretary.  They  carry  a  good 
assortment  of  abotit  |4,000,  consisting  of  carpets,  wall 
paper,  paints,  oils  and  general  household  furnishings.  He 
was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  serv- 
ing as  a  director,  now  vice-president;  is  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  ^It.  Pleasant  Wool  and  Live  Stock  Com- 
pany, and  an  extensive  wool-grower,  owning  over  5,000 
sheep,  and  buying  for  A.  J.  Knollin  &  Co.,  Kansas  City, 
Mo.  He  was  president  of  Board  of  Education  in  '96  and 
treasui'er  in  '97;  member  of  tlie  City  Council  two  years, 
and  ]>romiuent  in  Kepublicau  political  circles.  His  wife 
was  Edie,  datighter  of  Niels  and  Elizabeth  Nelson,  bom 
in  Mt.  Pleasant,  married  in  this  city  March  31,  1868.  They 
have  two  children:  Winifred  Z.,  born  December  9,  '96, 
and  Francis  H.,  September  6,  '91. 

JENSEN,  FRANCIS,  woolgrower  and  proprietor  of 
Nielson  House,  son  of  Jens  and  Trena  Jensen,  was 
born  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  January  1,  1865,  and  reared  a 
farmer.  When  about  14  he  started  out  to  make  his  way 
throtigh  the  world,  and  at  16  was  engaged  in  railroad 
grading  in  Colorado.  At  18  he  had  a  leg  broken  and  was 
laid  tip  for  one  year.  He  herded  eheep  for  Cahoon  and 
Erickson  for  five  years,  when  he  secured  1,000  head  on 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  247 

shares  and  kept  them  successfully.  Now  owns  about 
3,300  head,  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank. 
Is  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.,  holding  the  office  of  over- 
seer. In  '95  he  purchased  the  Nielson  Hotel,  which  lie 
conducts  with  satisfaction  to  the  traveling  public,  having 
the  leading  house  and  headquarters  for  commercial  trav- 
elers. His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Minersville,  June  28, 
1892,  was  Jemima,  daughter  of  William  and  IJenrietta 
Hotson.  They  have  three  children:  Pauline,  James  G. 
and  Henriettxi. 

JEXSEX,  JAMES  F.,  liquor  dealer,  son  of  Mads  and 
Mar;\^,  was  born  in  Goshen,  Utah,  September  2,  1858. 
In  '61  the  family  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  James 
was  educated  and  raised  a  fanner.  When  he  started  for 
himself  he  began  freighting  produce  to  the  mining  towns 
of  Utah  and  Nevada,  and  later  worked  in  the  mines  of 
Park  City  and  Bingham.  In  '84  he  opened  a  place  for 
selling  mild  drinks  and  cigars,  imnning  a  billiard  table, 
but  finally  enlarged  into  a  retail  liquor  store.  In  '88  he 
built  his  present  place,  one  of  the  nicest  buildings  in  the 
city,  where  he  carries  a  choice  line  of  wines,  liquors  and 
cigars,  and  conducts  a  poolroom.  He  is  also  a  woolgrower 
and  an  active,  enterprising  business  man,  always  ready 
to  invest  in  anything  for  the  public  good.  He  is  treasurer 
of  the  Queen  City  Roller  Mill  Company,  director  in  the 
Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  and  vice-president  of  the  Modem 
Mining  and  Milling  Company,  which  has  a  mill  in  Cherry 
Creek,  Nevada,  for  saving  ore  in  dumps.  Has  200  acres  of 
land,  and  in  company  with  John  H.  Seely  and  J.  H.  Proc- 
tor, has  imported  fifty-three  head  of  fine  shorthorn  cattle. 
Is  an  enthusiastic  Republican,  formerly  a  Liberal,  and  is 
past  master  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  April  9,  '83,  to  Josephine  F.,  daughter  of  Jens  and 
Trena  Jensen,  born  in  Ephraim,  February  7,  '60.  Her 
parents  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  Mt.  Pleasant, 
mother  still  living. 

JENSEN,   PETER,   lumberman,  son  of  Christian  and 
Annie,  was  born  in  Denmark,  June  6, 1842.  The  fam- 
ily joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  to  the 
TJnited  States  in  '54,  stopping  for  eight  years  in  Missouri. 


248  HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY. 

They  crossed  the  phiius  in  a  wagon  train,  Peter  driving  a 
team  for  Hooper  &  Eldredge,  and  hauling  merchandise. 
The  first  location  ^Yas  made  ten  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake 
atj,  where  he  Avas  engaged  several  years  in  getting  out 
lumber.  In  '67  he  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  and  has  since 
been  in  the  lumber  business.  He  owns  a  steam  saw-mill 
twelve  miles  east  of  Mt.  Pleasant  and  manufactures  lath, 
shingles  and  pickets.  Has  a  farm  of  twenty  acres  near 
the  city.  Was  mamed  in  Salt  Lake  City,  May  30,  '68,  to 
Jensina,  daughter  of  ^lels  and  Maria  Jensen,  born  in 
Denmark,  Octobei'  2,  18.1:9.  Tliey  have  had  twelve  chil- 
dren: Peter,  IMarinus,  Anna,  Joseph,  Isabel,  Emma  M., 
Frederick  L.  and  l*arley  P.,  living;  Francis,  Christian, 
John  W.  and  Tfosina,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  SOPHUS  E.,  farmer  and  woolgTower,  son  of 
Soren  and  ]Martlia  M.,  was  born  in  Odensa,  Denmark, 
September  16,  1856.  In  '62  his  mother,  a  widow,  with 
four  children,  came  to  Utah  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
At  the  age  of  15  he  went  away  to  work,  being  employed 
seven  years  by  Frank  Annstrong  in  a  saw-mill  at  Salt 
Lake  City.  He  then  engaged  in  freighting  produce  to  the 
mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada,  where  he  spent  six 
years.  Then  homesteaded  a  ranch,  engaging  in  farming 
and  sheep-raising,  in  which  he  has  been  successful.  He 
owns  a  fine  fann,  and  in  '97  erected  a  nice  brick  house  in 
the  city.  During  the  past  two  years  he  has  been  buyer  for 
the  Union  Wool  and  Live  Stock  Commission  Company,  in 
which  he  is  a  director.  Is  past  master  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W. 
AYas  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  July  19,  1880,  to  Lura  L., 
daughter  of  Duncan  and  Eliza  R.  Scovil  McArthur,  bom 
in  Mt.  Pleasant,  October  30,  '61.  They  have  four  living 
children:  Duncan  R.,  Rex,  Harald  and  an  infant. 

J  ESSEN,  JAMES,  mining  man,  one  of  the  early  settlers 
of  Sanpete  county,  was  married  to  Sine  Peterson, 
who  died,  and  on  September  24, 1894,  was  again  mar- 
ried in  Mt.  Pleasant  to  Mrs.  Caroline  L.  Neilson,  a  widow, 
daughter  of  Mads  and  Christena  Christensen,  bom  in 
Denmark.  Airs.  J.  Jessen's  aunt  and  uncle,  Amelia  and 
Jens  Peterson,  were  killed  by  Indians  near  Richfield,  dur- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  249 

ing  the  Black  Hawk  war.  The  present  wife  previously 
married  Soren  J.  Neilson,  a  merchant  and  first  cashier  of 
the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank.  He  was  a  prominent  woolgrower, 
an  elder  in  the  Presbyterian  church  and  an  enterprising 
man.  He  died  January  15, 1892.  The  children  were:  Peter 
S.,  Christian  J.,  Victor,  Clarence  J.  and  Florence  C. 

JOHNSON,  ABRAHAM,  merchant,  son  of  Christopher 
and  Mary  Evanson,  was  bom  in  Kisor,  Norw'ay,  Jan- 
uaiy  27,  1859.  His  parents  joined  the  Mormon 
"church  and  emigrated,  stopping  six  months  in  Canada, 
and  six  months  in  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  arriving  in 
Utah  in  '63  by  ox-train.  He  was  educated  at  the  B. 
Y.  Academy,  from  which  he  graduated  at  the  age 
of  21.  Taught  school  in  this  city  for  seven  years  and  was 
principal  of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  schools  in  1885-6.  Was 
City  Recorder  and  teacher  when  he  left  in  September, 
1886,  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  NorW' ay.  Upon  his  re- 
turn ^as  engaged  as  bookkeeped  for  the  Mt.  Pleasant 
Co-operative  Mercantile  Institution,  which  position  he 
held  till  '92.  In  '91  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Erastus 
Kofford  and  opened  a  general  store,  w^here  they  caiTy  an 
18,000  stock  of  dry  goods,  groceries,  crockery,  boots  and 
shoes  and  notions  and  do  a  prosperous  business.  The 
firm  owns  stock  in  the  Queen  City  Roller  Mill  Company, 
of  which  he  is  secretary. 

He  was  Mayor  of  the  city  for  two  terms,  1892  to 
'95,  and  was  nominated  by  the  Republican  party  for  State 
Senator  in  '96,  but  was  defeated.  His  wife  was  Vilate, 
daughter  of  George  W.  and  Mary  Wall  Bean,  bom  in 
Provo  April  27,  1864.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  August  28,  1884,  and  have  four  children:  Mabel  M., 
Evan  A.,  Virginius  L.  and  Geneva  B. 

JOHNSON,  EDMUND  C,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  was 
born  in  Copenhagen,  Denmark,  November  7,  1856. 
The  family  came  to  Utah  in  '63,  crossing  the  plains 
by  ox-train,  and  located  in  Spanish  Fork.  In  '64  they 
came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  Edmund  grew"  up  and  en- 
gaged in  various  occupations.  He  had  no  capital  and  en- 
gaged with  A.  A.  Cahoon  as  foreman  in  the  sheep  busi- 


250  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTV. 

ness  for  three  years.  He  then  took  the  sheep  oai  shares 
and  worked  up  to  a  fine  herd  of  about  2,400  head.  Owns 
a  ranch  of  220  acres.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Jan. 
20,  1882,  to  Josephine,  dau<>hter  of  Frederick  P.  and 
Christina  Is^eilsen.  She  was  born  and  maiTied  on  the  lot 
where  they  live.  They  had  six  children:  Edmund  A., 
Pearly  L.,  Yirtu  and  ]\rary  A.,  living;  Ferrington  W.  and 
Eugene,  deceased. 

JOHANSEN,  PETER,  deceased,  farmer,  son  of  John  A. 
and  Karon  Hennansen,  was  born  in  Denmark  T>e- 
cember  IS,  1827.  lie  joined  the  Mormon  church  and 
came  to  Utah  in  '58,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Ilaight's 
train,  and  located  at  E|)liraim.  In  '50  lie  came  to  Mt. 
Pleasant  among  the  lirst  settlers.  He  assisted  in  build- 
ing the  fort  and  lived  inside  it  one  summer.  In  the 
allotment  he  iT^ceived  a  tweny-acre  tract  and  added  to  it 
until  he  had  a  good  faiiu  of  sixty-five  acres  and  a  com- 
fortable home  in  the  city.  He  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  Was  president  of  the  Elders'  quorum  twenty 
years  and  counsellor  to  the  president  of  the  High  Priests' 
quorum  at  the  time  of  his  death.  A^'as  married  Novem- 
ber 21,  1858,  to  Annie  C,  daughter  of  Mikkel  and  Karen 
Ohirstensen,  born  in  Denmark  Ma3'  29,  1836.  They  had 
ten  children:  Pett^r,  Nilsina,  Cecelia,  Mina,  Mary,  John 
and  Charley,  living;  ^IcCarl,  Caroline  and  Annie,  de- 
ceased. Second  wife  Avas  Sena  Jacobsen.  She  had  six 
children:  Joseph,  Andmw,  Christian  and  Ella,  living; 
Tina  and  Martin,  deceased. 

JOliDAN,  LEONARD  J.,  woolgrower,  son  of  James  F. 
and  Sarah  C,  was  born  in  Hampshire,  England, 
Augnst  12,  1849.  His  parents  joined  the  Monnon 
church  and  emigrated  to  Utah  in  '55,  crossing  the  plains 
from  Atchison,  Kansas,  in  an  ox-train,  locating  in  Fann- 
Ington.  After  a  shor-t.  stay  they  went  to  AVest  Jordan, 
thence  to  Rush  Valley  in  '58,  thence  to  Salt  Lake  City 
and  back  to  Rush  Valley,  whei'e'  the  father  resides, 
mother  being  dead.  Leonard  was  engaged  in  herding  till 
24  years  of  age,  when  he  began  in  the  sheep  business  for 
himsielf.    He  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '81  and  has  since 


HISTOBY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  251 

been  extensively  engaged  in  woolgrowing,  importing  and 
breeding  tliorouglibi^d  French  merinos.  He  owns  about 
300  acres  of  land  and  a  fine  residence  in  the  city.  Is  a 
stockholder  in  tlie  Mt.  Pleasant  Eoller  Mill  Company, 
being  president  for  several  years,  and  is  a  director  in  the 
Electric  Light  Company,  having  been  pi-esident.  Assisted 
in  organizing  the  Mr.  Pleasant  Wool  and  Live  Stock 
Commission  Company,  being  the  first  manager;  alsoi 
helped  organize  the  Soutliem  L'^tah  WoolgTowers^  Asso- 
ciation at  Nephi,  being  one  of  the  executive  board.  Was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  four  years.  Is  a  member 
of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  On  October  10,  1888,  he  started  on  a 
mission  to  England,  where  he  labored  in  the  Birmingham 
and  London  confei'ences,  returning  August  20,  1890.  His 
wife  was  Emily  M.,  daughter  of  David  H.  and  Fanny  C. 
Caldwell,  born  in  Salt  Lake  county  September  28,  1856. 
They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  September  29,  1873, 
and  have  four  children:  Leonard  E.,  married  Mary  I. 
Beck;  they  have  one  child,  Marion  E.;  David  H.,  Alvin 
E.  and  Fanny  C. 

JOIKxENSEN,  JENS,  retired  farmer,  was  born  in  Den- 
mark April  18,  1823.  He  was  raised  a  farmer  and 
served  in  the  army  over  four  years,  being  in  several 
heavy  battles.  Joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '51  and  was 
engaged  as  a  traveling  elder  for  about  six  years  and  pre- 
sided over  the  Frederica  conference  for  three  years.  In 
'57  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Cow- 
ley's company.  In  '58  he  settled  in  Ephraim  and  in  the 
spring  of  '59  removed  to  Mt,  Pleasant,  being  among  the 
first  settlers.  He  assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  took 
part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  commander  of  the 
post  and  major  in  the  militia.  He  owns  a  nice  forty-acre 
farm  and  residence.  Was  a  member  of  the  first  City 
Council  and  head  teacher  in  the  church  for  many  years. 
His  first  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Denmark,  was  Chris- 
tiana Christensen.  She  died  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1894, 
leaving  seven  children:  John  S.,  Sarali,  James,  Lena, 
George,  Elizabeth  and  Ellnora.  Second  wife  was  Chris* 
tina  Bertolsen.  She  has  seven  children:  Mary,  Jennie, 
Bert,  Daniel,  William,  Franklin  and  Joseph. 


252  HISTOltY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

CAKSEN,  JAMES,  woolgrower,  son  of  James  and  ]Mary 
Anderson,  was  born  in  Epliraim,  January  18,  1858. 
His  parents  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59;  father 
died  liere  and  mother  is  still  living.  James  worked  on  his 
stepfather's,  Hans  Poulsen's  faim  initil  the  age  of  20, 
when  he  engaged  in  freighting  to  the  mining  towns  of 
Utah  and  Nevada.  In  1881  he  purchased  an  eighty-acre 
farm  west  of  the  Sanpitch  river,  where  he  lived  until  '87, 
when  he  left  on  a  two-years'  mission  to  Georgia,  Alabama 
and  Florida.  In  '90  he  engaged  in  the  sheep  business  in 
company  witli  his  brother  Andrew,  having  about  5,000 
head,  owning  a  pail  and  the  balance  on  sliares.  In  '91 
the.y  divided  interests  and  he  now  has  three  herds,  or 
about  8,000  liead,  8,500  being  his  own.  He  own  a  tine  new 
brick  residence  in  the  city.  Was  one  of  the  organizers  and 
is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Electric  Light  Com- 
pany, of  which  he  has  been  a  director  and  president;  is  a 
director  in  the  Cedar  Creek  and  Twin  Creek  Reservoir 
Company,  and  one  of  the  i)residents  of  the  Sixty-sixth 
(>uorum  of  Seventies.  In  the  fall  of  '97  was  elected  mem- 
ber of  City  Council,  being  the  second  highest  in  receiving 
votes  of  any  member  on  the  Kepublican  ticket.  His  wife 
was  Eliza  Maria  Tidwoll,  daughter  of  James  H.  and  Eliz- 
abeth Harvey  Tidwell.  Her  father  was  one  of  the  promi- 
nent and  leading  men  of  early  days.  They  have  three  chil- 
dren: Alberta  :M.,  born  October  18,  1882;  Edith  E., 
IMarch  31,  '85;  Ha  P.,  April  18,  '93. 

£APSEN,  LAUKITZ,  of  New  State  Portrait  Company, 
son  of  Lauritz  and  Ida  C,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
August  28,  1867.  His  parents  were  natives  of  Den- 
mark; came  to  Utah  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  where 
his  father  was  Justice  of  the  Peace  for  many  years,  super- 
intendent of  the  Sunday  school  two  yeai's,  and  a  man  of 
prominence.  Father  now  dead,  mother  still  living.  He 
grew  up  in  this  city,  attending  the  district  schools  and 
the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo.  Was  engaged  as  a  clerk  in 
different  stores,  and  opened  a  general  store  in  company 
with  his  brothers,  Peter  A.  and  George  W.  In  '95  he  sold 
out  to  the  brothers.  In  '97  the  New  State  Portrait  Com- 
pany was  organized  and  he  was  made  president.  His  wife 


k 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  253 

was  Imogene,  daughter  of  Gustave  and  Dora  Day  John- 
son, boru  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  January  4,  1872.  They  were 
married  in  Manti,  February  19,  1890,  and  have  three  chil- 
dren: Florence,  born  February  14,  '91;  Dora,  September 
13,  '92;  and  Myrtle,  February  14,  '96. 

eUNDBERG,  AUGUST,  jeweler  and  dentist,  son  of 
Andrew  and  Louesa,  was  born  in  Upsala,  Sweden, 
November  1,  1849.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  jeweler 
in  Stockholm  and  the  tinner's  trade  of  his  father.  Came 
to  Utah  in  '79,  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant  and  opened  a  tin- 
shop,  Avhich  he  conducted  several  years.  In  '85  he  opened 
a  jeweler's  store,  and  having  learned  dentistry  in  Salt 
Lake  City,  he  added  that  to  his  business,  making  a  suc- 
cess of  both.  He  is  superintendent  and  general  manager 
of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Electric  Light  Company,  having  held 
the  position  since  its  organization  in  July,  "98.  His  wife, 
whom  he  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  7,  1880,  was 
( -hristina  M.  Anderson.  She  died  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  August 
f),  189G,  leaving  three  children:  Edwin  G.,  Mabel  and 
Kaney. 

CUND,  HON.  C.  N.,  son  of  Lauritz  and  Fredrikke  Niel- 
sen, was  born  in  Seest,  Denmark,  Januaiy  13,  1846. 
Being  one  of  a  large  family,  he  was  compelled  to 
earn  his  living  from  early  boyhood.  He  joined  the  Mor- 
mon church  in  1858,  and  traveled  as  a  missionary  from 
1865  till  1868.  He  left,  his  native  land  for  Utah  in  June, 
'68,  and  arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City  on  September  25th  of 
that  year,  crossing  the  plains  in  the  last  train  of  ox-teams 
that  came  over.  Worked  on  the  railroad  in  Echo  and 
^yeber  canyons,  and  stopped  for  a  time  in  '69  in  Brigham 
City.  He  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  the  fall  of  '69.  Filled 
a  mission  to  the  Northwest  in  '79  and  '80,  laboring  in 
Minnesota,  Iowa  and  Nebraska.  Served  four  years  as 
City  Recorder,  three  years  as  a  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil, and  six  years  as  Mayor.  Was  a  member  of  the  Consti- 
tutional Conventions  held  in  1882  and  1887  in  Salt  Lake 
City.  Served  as  a  member  of  the  Legislature  in  the  House 
in  '90  and  City  Council  in  '94.  Was  Justice  of  the  Peace 
for  six  years.  Was  appointed  Bishop,  May  20,  1890,  which 


254  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

position  he  now  holds  with  perfect  satisfaction  to  the  peo- 
ple. He  filled  a  mission  to  Scandiua\  ia  from  May,  189G,  to 
June,  1898,  during  which  he  presided  over  the  mission, 
including-  Norway,  Sweden  and  Denmark.  He  is  a  promi- 
nent man  and  a  representative  citizen  of  this  city.  His 
first  wife  was  Petra  M.  Jensen,  born  in  Denmark,  Febru- 
ary 21,  1852.  They  were  maiTied  in  Salt  Lake  City,  Octo- 
ber 11,  '69,  and  had  six  children:  Christian  N.,  Eliza  (wife 
of  George  W.  Larsen),  AYilliam  L.  and  James  A.,  living; 
Amelia  M.  and  Parley  P.,  deceased.  Wife  died  August  21, 
1882.  Second  wife  was  Christina  A.,  daughter  of  Neils 
and  Anna  C.  Neilson,  born  in  Denmark,  September  22, 
1859.  They  Avere  married  October  9,  '81,  and  have  had 
six  children:  Waldemar  M.,  Christian  M.  E.,  Amanda  C, 
Esther  M.  J.  and  Anthon  R.,  living;  Thorwald  C,  de- 
ceased. 

fT\  ADSEX,  ANDKEW,  of  Madsen  and  Sons'  Mercan- 
1  1  I  tile  Company,  son  of  Lars  and  Bodel,  was  born  in 
'  '  Denmark,  on  the  island  of  Sjalland,  March  3, 
1835.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  carpenter.  Joined  the 
Mormon  church  and  emigrated  in  '55,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train  under  Canute  Peterson,  reaching  Salt  Lake 
City-  in  the  fall  of  '56  and  located  in  Brigham  City,  where 
he  lived  until  Johnson's  anny  annved.  In  '58  he  removed 
to  Ephraim  and  in  '59  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  among  the 
first  settlers,  and  assisted  in  building  the  fort,  being  cap- 
tain over  ten  men.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  being  captain  of  a  company,  and  in  the  en- 
gagement in  Salina  canyon.  He  took  up  twenty  acres  of 
land  and  engaged  in  farming.  Was  the  first  City  Trea- 
surer and  a  member  of  the  City  Council  for  about  twenty 
years.  Was  a  candidate  for  Mayor  on  the  Democratic 
ticket,  but  the  ticket  was  defeated.  In  church  matters  he 
has  always  been  active.  He  owns  about  500  acres  of  fine 
land.  In  '68,  when  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Z.  C.  M.  I.  was  organ- 
ized, he  was  one  of  the  largest  stockholders  and  for  many 
years  was  superintendent.  His  present  fine  store  building 
was  erected  by  the  company  and  he  and  C.  W.  Anderson 
purchased  it,  leasing  it  for  several  years,  afterward  open- 
ing a  general  store.    In  Mav,  '93  the  Union  Mercantile 


I 


HISTORY    OF    SA.NPETE    COUNTY.  255 

Company  was  organized.  The  company  was  ebauged  to 
its  present  name  in  '97,  Andrew  Madsen  being  president 
and  bis  son,  Neil  M.,  seci^etai'T,  treasurer  and  general 
manager.  He  is  also  an  extensive  stock  and  slieep  raiser. 
Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank  and  the  West- 
ern Loan  Association  of  Salt  Lake  City.  Is  president  of 
the  Pleasant  Creek  In-igation  Company  and  a  stockholder 
in  the  Twin  Creek  Irrigation  Company,  He  is  also  presi- 
dent of  the  Union  Wool  and  Live  Stock  Commission  Com.- 
pany.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  December  26,  1858,  to 
Johanna  E.,  daughter  of  Niels  Wintergxeen  Anderson, 
born  in  Malmo,  Sweden,  December  15,  1840.  Their  living 
children  are:  Annie,  wife  of  Andrew  Pearson;  Andrew 
C,  Anthon  W.,  Neil  M.  and  Hilda  E.  The  deceased  were: 
Hannah  L.,  Louesa  B.,  Emma  and  Lauritz. 

rf\  ADSEN,  LARS  P.,  woolgrower  and  farmer,  son  of 
Ml  Mads  Madsen  and  Ellen  Hanson  Madsen,  was 
'  \  born  in  Ephraim,  December  14,  1858.  His  parents 
were  natives  of  Denmark,  emigrating  to  Utah  in  '57, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  and  locating  at  Eph- 
raim. Father  died  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  October  17,  1895; 
mother  still  living.  Lars  was  raised  a  farmer,  and  at  the 
age  of  23  married  and  purchased  a  farm  of  sixteen  acres. 
In  1891  he  bought  1,000  sheep  and  has  been  veiy  success- 
ful, having  at  present  about  1,600,  after  selling  1,000  this 
year.  He  owns  eighty-five  acres  of  land  and  has  a  nice 
residence  in  the  city.  In  politics  he  is  a  Republican,  and 
has  been  a  member  of  the  City  Council  two  yeai'^,  sei'ving 
in  '91  and  '92.  He  was  appointed  counsel  to  the  Bishop  in 
May,  1890,  and  is  a  consistent  churchman.  In  1886  he 
performed  a  mission  to  Georgia.  His  wife,  whom  he  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  10,  1881,  was  Sophia, 
daughter  of  Martin  and  Kam  M.  Christensen  Rasmussen, 
born  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  October  12,  1861.  Their  children 
are:  William,  Edna,  Theresa,  Ruby,  Sophronia  and 
Edith,  living;  Heber,  deceased. 

rr\  ADSEN,  NEIL  M.,  manager  of  A.  Madsen  &  Sons' 
Ml  Mercantile  Company,  son  of  Andrew  and  Johan- 
^  I  na  Anderson,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Septem- 
ber 21,  1873.    He  attended  the  Mt.  Pleasant  schools,  took 


256  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

a  course  of  bookkeeping  and  obtained  a.  commercial  edu- 
cation. Was  employed  as  a  clei^k  in  the  Union  Mercan- 
tile Company's  stoi'e  foi'  six  and  a  half  years,  then  pro- 
moted to  the  position  of  manager.  They  carTy  a  $20,000 
stock  of  dry  goods,  groc(a'ics  and  everything  kept  in  a 
large  commercial  retail  house.  The  Union  Mercantile 
Company  was  sold  to'  A.  Madsen  &  Sons  November  30, 
1897.  He  is  an  active,  energetic  young  man,  being  pro- 
prietor of  the  Union  I'arlor  Company,  where  he  keeps  a 
manager  selling  ice  cream  and  confectioneries.  Is  also 
secretary  of  the  l^nion  \\'o<d  and  Live  Stock  Commission 
Company,  which  position  he  fills  with  perfect  satisfac- 
tion. 

rY\  ADSEX,  NIELS  P.,  fanner  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
/  I  I  Lars  and  Bod  el,  was  born  in  Denmark  December 
I  I  17,  1832.  The  family,  consisting  of  parents  and 
seven  cliildren,  emigrated  to  the  United  States 
in  '55,  stopi)ing  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  for  the  winter,  thence 
acro-ss  the  plains  in  ox-tiain  under  Canute  Peterson,  ar- 
riving in  Salt  J^ake  City  Sc^ptember  20,  1856.  Father 
died  on  the  road  at  Devil's  Gate,  family  locating  in  Brig- 
ham  City,  then  in  Ei)hrjiliu  and  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in 
'59.  Niels  assisted  in  const ructing  the  fort,  took  up  1(50 
acres  of  land  and  began  farming  and  stockraising.  Dur- 
ing the  Black  Hawk  war  he  was  active  and  gave  five 
horses  to  those  who  had  none  to  help  in  chasing  Indians. 
He  served  thixM-  terms  as  member  of  the  City  Council. 
Was  bishop  of  the  North  Ward  from  '78  to  '81  and  has 
always  been  intei'estetl  in  road  improvement.  His  wife 
was  Lena,  darrghter  of  Rasmus  and  Mai-ia  Jorgensen, 
born  in  Denmark  Janury  3,  1810.  They  were  married 
riear  Salt  Lake  City  January  3,  1857,  and  have  nine  chil- 
dren: Mary,  Elizabeth  S.,  Peter  H.,  Rasmus  L.,  Lena. 
George  G.,  David,  Alonzo  and  Berta. 

rr\  AIBEN.  ALFRED  H.,  druggist,  son  of  Henry  and 
111  Flora  L.  Maddison,  was  born  in  Provo,  July  30, 
'  '  1873.  His  father  was  a  druggist,  painter  and 
ar*tist,  also  an  actor,  qirite  well  known  throughout  Utah. 
Alfred  attended  the  district  schools  of  Provo  and  Salt 


HISTORY    OF'  SANPETE    COUNTY.  257 

Liik('  CitY  and  the  B.  Y.  Academy,  beeoming  a  pharma- 
oist.  IIc'  i)assed  a  satisfactory  examiuiitiou  Febriiai'y  13, 
1894,  aud  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  Jnly,  1894,  where,  in 
company  Avith  H.  R.  McGraw,  he  opened  his  present  place 
of  business.  In  February,  189G,  they  purchased  another 
store  in  Pai'k  City,  which  McGraw  conducted  one  year, 
Avhen  he  took  the  Park  City  and  Alfred  the  Mt.  Pleasant 
store  aloiue.  He  caiTies  a  good  stock  of  |3,000,  consisting 
of  drugs,  chemicals,  patent  medicines,  druggists'  sundries 
and  is  doing  a  tine  business.  Is  a  membei'  of  the  A.  U. 
IT.  W.,  being  foi-eman.  His  wife  was  Annie,  daughter  of 
Frank  and  Ellen  Pntchett,  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  They 
were  married  in  Manti  June  24,  1897. 

rr\  AR^SHALL,  GEORGE  HOWELL,  M.  S.,  principal 
ill  ^^  asatcli  Academ}^,  Avas  born  near  Dayton,  Ohio, 
'  y  Octobei'  5,  18G1.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
attended  school  during  the  winter  months.  When  he 
was  10  the  family  removed  to  Tuscola,  111.,  AA-here  he 
passed  through  high  school,  and  then  went  to  Lebanon, 
Ohio,  taking  a  teaeher's  and  scientitic  course  at  the  Na- 
tional Normal  UniA'ersity.  His  tirst  school  Avas  in  Cham- 
paign county,  111.,  AA^here  he  taught  seA^eral  years.  Taught 
one  year  in  South  Dakota.  ReceiA^ed  State  certificates  in 
Illinois  and  Dakota,  also  State  certificate'  for  teaehing 
institutes  in  Illinois.  Was  i>rincipal  and  engaged  in  high 
school  work  for  several  years  in  Illinois.  In  '92  he  came 
to  Mt.  Pleasant^  accepting  his  present  position.  He  has 
had  great  success  in  his  Avoi'k  and  giA^eii  perfect  satisfac- 
tion, being  well  liked  by  patrons  and  pupils  and  teachers 
under  his  direction.  In  '97  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
City  Council.  Was  married  in  Tuscola,  111.,  August  28, 
1890,  to  Mary  Waddell,  who  was  a  teacher  of  eight  years' 
experience.  They  have  three  children:  William,  George 
H.,  Jr.,  and  John. 

rY\  ATSON,  PETER,  merchant  and  acting  bishop,  son 
ill  of  Mons  Matson  and  Maria  Pearson,  was  born  in 
'  y  SAveden  March  3,  1851.  He  learned  the  shoema- 
ker trade,  joined  the  Mormon  church  at  13  and  was  a 
traveling  elder  at  18.    In  '73  he  came  tO'  Utah  and  in  '74 


258  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

located  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  following-  Ms  trade  in  manufac- 
turing shoes.  He  performed  a  mission  of  over  two  years 
in  Sweden,  leaving  for  bis  work  in  1885.  Upon  his  re- 
turn he  engaged  in  business  with  Ole  Hansen  and  con- 
ducted it  successfully  till  '95,  when  the  store  and  cream- 
evy  were  consolidated  under  a  stock  company.  He  is  sec- 
retar\^,  treasuier  and  manager  of  the  store,  which  com- 
prises a  choice  stock  of  dry  goods,  groceries,  boots  and 
shoes  and  general  merchaindise.  Is  secretary  of  the  Mt. 
Pleasant  Electric  Light  Company,  a  Republican  and  in- 
fluential citizen.  He  seiwed  as  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  in  1894-5  and  acts  as  bishop  while  C.  N.  Lund 
is  on  a  mission.  His  AAife  was  Matilda  Liljedahl,  native 
of  Svreden,  born  December  8,  1851.  They  have  had  twelve 
children:  Augusta,  John,  Josejjh,  Otto  and  Ethel,  liv- 
ing. Second  wife  was  Maiy  Roseuluud,  wlioi  had  five 
children:  Williajn,  Bh'uda,  Lydia  and  Esther,  living; 
I'erin^,  deceased. 

nrV '(^LEXAHAX,  :MKS.  sap  ah  E.,  daughter  of  Wil- 
/  I  I  liam  and  Annie  Reynolds,  was  born  in  Pleasant 
i  i  (Jrov(^  Utali,  December  3,  1858.  In  '63  her  pa- 
rents came  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  Her  father  took  an  active 
pai't  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  was  a  member  of  the  Mot- 
mon  church  ajid  Justice  of  the  Peace  for  many  years. 
She  M  as  marHed  in  Mt.  Pleasant  June  18,  1877,  to  James 
K.  JMcClenahan.  He  served  as  Justice  of  the  Peace  one 
term  and  member  of  the  City  Council  two  years.  Si)ent 
one  year  on  a  mission  in  Alabama.  Was  a  stockraiser 
and  member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  He  died  May  5,  1897. 
Their  children  are:  Annie,  James  W.,  Joseph  K.,  Ellice 
and  Clyde. 

rY\  EI  LING,  JAMES  C,  farmer,  son  of  Peter  and  Kat- 
/  1  I  riua,  was  born  in  Denmark  April  17,  1834.  He 
'  '  joined  the  Moiiuon  church  and  came  to  Utah  in 
'50,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Cowley's  company,  locat- 
ing in  Epliraim  in  '57.  In  '59  he  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant, 
assisted  in  building  thie  fort  and  guarding  against  In- 
dians during  the  Black  Hawk  war.  He  took  up  twenty 
acres  of  land  and  now  has  a  good  seventy-acre  farm  three 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  259 

miles  north,  of  the  city.  He  burned  the  first  brick  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  for  a  residence  and  for  other  buildings.  Was 
watermaster  several  years  and  road  superyisor  one  term. 
In  '87  he  sold  out  and  removed  to  his  present  location. 
His  first  wife  was  Elizabeth  Clemenson.  They  were  mar- 
ried in  Keokuk,  Iowa,  in  1856.  She  died  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
leaving  two  children:  Peter,  a  fanner  and  neighbor,  and 
Christian,  deceased.  Second  wife  was  Hannah,  daugh- 
ter of  Andrew  and  Rasmina  Peterson,  born  in  Denmark. 
They  were  manied  in  1863  and  have  seven  children: 
Annie  F.,  Erastus,  Hannah,  Sadie,  Olivia,  Earl  and  Vida. 

rY\  EYKICK,  JAMES  D.,  woolgrower,  son  of  John  and 
/  1  I  Jemima,  Hutchinson,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
'  y  November  6,  1861.  At  the  age  of  11  he  started 
out  to  make  his  own  living.  In  '84  he  began  herding 
sheep  and  in  '90  engaged*in  the  business  with  O.  P.  Win- 
chester, taking  sheep  on  shares.  They  continued  to- 
gather  for  two  years,  when  James  entei'ed  the  Parkville 
College  in  Missouri,  remaining  three  years.  On  his  re- 
turn from  college  he  organized  a  sheepcompany  known 
as  the  American  Renburg  firm,  consisting  of  himself  and 
brother  George,  and  Charles  Renburg.  They  keep  aboiit 
4,000  sheep  and  do  a  large  buying  and  shipping  business. 
James  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Union  Hide  and  Pelt 
Company.  He  was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  May  12,  1896, 
to  Annie  F.  Jensen.  They  have  two  children:  Pearl  D. 
and  Clara  Y. 

pr\  ONSEN,  JAMES,  woolgrower,  son  of  Peter  and 
Ml  Dorthea,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  April  21,  1867. 
'  '  The  family  came  to  Utah  in  '58  and  in  the  spring 
of  "59  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  living  in  the  fort.  His 
father  was  a,  prominent  man  in  the  church,  being  head 
teacher  and  bishop's  counsellor  for  many  years.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  for  several  years.  In  1897 
he  went  to  J)enmark  on  a  mission.  James  was  raised  on 
a  farm  and  engaged  in  the  sheep  business.  He  now  owns 
about  3,500  head  of  good  sheep.  Was  married  in  Logan 
Januaiy  25,  1888,  to  Mary    A.,  daughter    of    Hans  and 


260  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE   COUNTY, 

Mary  Poiilsen,  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  July  7,  1866.  They 
have  four  children:  Maiiau  D.,  Pauline,  James  A.  and 
Hans  P. 

nr\  ONSEN,  JOSEPH,  aty  Marshal,  son  of  Peter  and 
I  I  I  Dorthea,  was  bom  in  Mt.  l*leasant  May  1,  1863. 
/  '  He  was  brought  up  on  a  farm,  and  at  the  age  of 
21  purchased  a  faiTii,  engaging-  in  the  cattle  business,  at 
whicli  he  has  been  wry  siiccfssful.  In  '05  lie  was  elected 
City  Marshal  and  re-elected  in  '97,  being  a  popular  and 
efficient  officer.  AVas  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Noa ember 
4,  1886,  to  Annette,  daughter  of  Niels  and  Karen  Neilson, 
born  in  Mt.  Ph-asant  October  11,  18<)4.  They  ha\e  three 
children:  Fh>rence,  born  September  14,  1887;  Raymond, 
September  KJ,  1880,  and  A'enette,  December  21,  1894. 

NEILSON,  ANDREW,  fanner,  son  of  Neils  and  Kama, 
was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  October  14,  1864.  The 
family  came  from  v^w<m1<mi  in  '63  and  located  in  this 
city.  Andre^^'  was  rais(Hl  to  farming  and  has  always  fol- 
lowed the  business.  His  father  died  hei"e  April  3,  1885, 
mother*  still  living.  He  was  elected  City  Justice  in  '95 
and  re-elected  in  '97.  Owns  a  small  faiTn  and  is  a  stock- 
holder and  secretan'  and  ti'eiasurer  of  the  North  Ci'eek 
Irrigation  Company. 

K I  l^]ILSON,  HANS,  farmer,  son  of  Neils  and  Caroline, 
JM  was  born  in  Sweden  March  14,  1857.  The  family 
'  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  when  he  was  a  small  boy.  He 
was  raised  on  a,  farm  and  work(^d  on  the  home  for  a  num- 
ber of  years.  AA'as  engagi^i  for  some  time  in  fiieighting 
produce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada.  He 
now  owns  about  180  acres  of  land.  Was  married  in 
Manti  March  13,  1890,  to  Amelia,  daughter  of  Hans  J. 
and  Caroline  Simpson,  born  in  ^It.  Pleasant  May  7,  1864. 
They  have  two  children:  Francis  J.,  bom  January  29, 
1891,  aind  Piiscilla  C,  Januai-y  1,  1894. 

k  I  EILSON,  H.  S.,  of  the  Sanpete  County  Co-op,  largest 
\\  merchandisie  fliin  in  the  county,  was  bom  June  16, 
i  1853.  He  was  a  clerk  in  the  Co-op  store  for  several 
years,  then  took  an  intei-est  which  the  family  still  retains. 


JAMES    MONSEX. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


W.   W.   WOODRIXG,    M.    D. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


I 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  261 

Assisted  in  organizing  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  and.  was 
casliier  until  his  health  failed  and  he  was  compelled  to 
retire  from  business.  Was  married  January  20,  1872,  to- 
Josephine,  daughter  of  Bent  and  Helena  Hansen,  bora  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  April  1,  1861.  They  have  four  children: 
Heniw  L.,  born  Xovember  28,  1882;  Albeilha,  September 
28,  1884;  Christine,  March  29,  1889,  and  Olive  H.,  March 
1,  1891. 

Kl  EILSEN,  N.  B,,  deceased,  was  born  in  Sweden  July 
\\  7,  1837.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  carpenter.  Joined 
*  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah  in  -63,  cross- 
ing the  plains  in  an  ox-train,  and  located  in  Ephraim. 
In  1864  he  i^moved  to  Sevier  county  to  assist  in  settling 
that  section,  but  was  compelled  to  leave  on  account  of 
Indians,  and  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  Avhere  he  followed 
his  trade  for  several  years.  He  built  the  Xeilsen  House 
and  conducted  it  as  a  hotel  for  many  years.  He  died  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  September  21,  1895,  His  wife,  whom  he 
mamed  in  Ephraim  November  6,  1863,  was  Elizabeth, 
daughter  of  Hans  and  Kersta  Olsen,  born  in  Sweden 
April  6,  1830.  They  had  three  children:  Mary,  Eda,  wife 
of  F.  C.  Jensen,  and  Hilma,  wife  of  Louis  F.  Becker  of 
Manti. 

KjEILSOX,  XEILS  P.,  faiiuer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
|M  Peter  and  flattie,  was  born  in  Denmark  September 
'  8,  1846.  He  worked  at  the  cooper  trade,  on  a  farm 
and  at  dairying.  In  1867  the  family  came  to  Utah,  stop- 
ping tAVoi  years  in  Ephraim,  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
in  1869.  'The  father  died  here  in  :March,  1892,  mother 
still  living.  Xeils  worked  in  mining  camj)s  for  several 
years,  opened  a  store  in  Spring  City  in  1875  and  con- 
ducted it  till  1881.  Removed  to  Pleasant  View  in  1884. 
He  is  a  successfu]  farmer  and  ovrus  over  300  acres  of  land 
and  about  3,000  head  of  sheep.  In  company  with  H.  C. 
Beauman  and  S.  J.  Xeilson  he  built  the  Wasatch  stoone, 
which  they  kept  for  two  years  and  sold.  Is  a  stock- 
holder and  director  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  owns  stock 
in  the  Queen  City  Roller  Mill;  is  a  stockholder  and  direc- 
tor in  the  Creamerv  and  the  Cedar  Creek  Reservoir  Com- 


262  HISTORY  or  sanpete  county. 

pau}'.  \\'as  maiTied  iu  Mt.  Pleasant  March  26,  1875,  to 
Mary  D.  C,  daughter  of  Hans  C.  and  Annie  M,  Davidson, 
born  in  Denmark  February  22,  1853.  Her  jDarents  came 
iiere  in  ISGS;  both  died  in  this  city.  Fatlier  was  tlie  first 
printer  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  Their  children  are:  Mattie  L. 
(J.,  Voltaire  ^^.  P.,  Hocrates  H.  A.,  Cortez  N.  A.,  Grace  D. 
J.  and  OharleniagTie  G.  E. 

Kf  EILSON,  N.  S.,  president  Mt.  Pleasant  bank  and  large 
JM  sheepman,  son  of  Xeils  and  Beuta  Swenson,  was 
I  born  in  Sm  edeu,  September  5,  1848.  In  '68  he  came 
to  Utah  with  a  sister,  Hannah,  locating  in  Moroni,  where 
he  engaged  in  farming,  mining  and  railroading.  About 
'09  he  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  and  in  '72  became  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Sanpete  County  Oo-op.  store,  the  largest 
institution  of  its  kind  iu  the  county.  In  '77  he  engaged  in 
the  cattle  business  in  a  small  way,  and  in  '97  sold  1,000 
head.  He  stai-ted  in  the  slic^p  business  in  '83,  now  having 
about  10,000  head,  having  bought  and  sold  about  20,000 
in  the  fall  of  '97.  When  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Commercial  and 
Savings  bank  was  organized,  he  became  one  of  the  largest 
stockholdei'S  and  was  elected  president,  which  position  he 
now  holds.  He  also  carries  a  small  stock  of  agricultural 
implements.  Conducted  a  meat  market  for  several  years. 
Is  a.  stockholder  in  the  Electric  Light  Company,  and  trea- 
surer; has  stock  in  both  the  roller  mills,  being  pi'esident 
of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  mill.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil two  teims,  and  elected  Mayor  in  '95.  Is  a  member  of 
the  I.  O.  O.  F.  His  wife  was  Beuta,  daughter  of  Neils  and 
Karn  Neilson,  born  in  Sweden,  June  5,  1860.  They  were 
married  in  ]\It.  Pleasant,  October  3,  1883,  and  have  had 
three  children:  Irene  and  Beatrice,  living;  Adie,  de- 
ceased. 

WeILSOK,  ANDREW  S.,  manager  Sanpete  County 
1)1  Co-op.,  son  of  Neils  and  Beuta  Swenson,  was  born 
I  in  Sweden,  June  22,  1851.   In  '72  he  and  his  brother 

Hans  came  to  Utah  and  engaged  in  mining,  railroading 
and  brickmaking  in  Juab  county  and  near  Salt  Lake  City. 
They  came  to  Mt  Pleasant  in  '76  and  bought  their  present 
place,  engaging  in  business  with  a  few  hundred  dollars. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  268 

In  '88  they  built  their  two-story  brick,  keeping  the  small 
one,  and  continued  to  do  a  most  prosperous  business.  The 
stock  contains  about  |20,000  assortment  of  dry  goods, 
clothing,  hats  and  caps,  boots  and  shoes,  crockery,  glass- 
ware and  general  merchandise.  Business  is  owned  by 
three  brothers,  X.  S.,  A.  S.  and  H.  S.  Xeilsou,  and  August 
AVall,  A.  C.  Wall,  Jr.,  and  O.  G.  Bjelke.  Andrew  is  a 
director  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  president  of  the  Queen 
City  Eoller  Mill  Company,  and  an  influential  member  of 
the  I.  O.  O.  F.  lodge  and  the  Eepublican  party.  His  wife 
was  Hannah  M.,  daughter  of  John  and  Sophia  M.  Olsen, 
bom  in  Denmark,  July  31,  1859.  They  were  married  in 
Mt.  Pleasant,  October  12,  1878,  and  have  five  children: 
George  P.,  Addie  C,  Khoda  H.,  Andrew  L.  and  Roxie  C. 

OLSOX,  WILLIAM,  farmer,  son  of  John  and  Sophia 
Maria,  was  born  on  Bomholm  island,  Denmark, 
June  3,  1853.  In  '66  the  family  came  to  Utah,  cross- 
ing the  ocean  in  the  ship  "Kenilworth,"  and  the  plains  in 
an  ox-train,  under  Capt.  Eawlins,  father  of  Senator  Raw- 
lins, and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  Father  still  lives,  88 
years  of  age;  mother  died  in  '82.  William  was  brought 
up  a  farmer  and  owns  a  farm  of  forty  acres.  In  '87  he 
engaged  in  the  sheep  business,  under  the  firm  name  of 
Olson  &  Rosenlof.  They  have  about  2,500  head.  He  as- 
sisted in  organizing  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank  and  the  Elec- 
tric Light  Company,  owning  stock  in  each.  In  '95  he  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council  on  the  Republican 
Ticket,  and  was  re-elected  in  '97.  His  wife  was  Sarah  J., 
daughter  of  Harvey  and  Elizabeth  Tidwell,  born  in  Plea- 
sant Grove.  Her  parents  were  among  the  early  settlers  of 
Mt.  Pleasant.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  April  10, 
'76.  They  have  five  children:  William  A.,  Berkley,  Guy 
K.,  Theodore  and  Mary  E. 

OSTERLIX,  PETER  H.,  farmer  and  carpenter,  son  of 
Hans  P.  and  Hannah,  was  born  in  Sweden,  Xovem- 
ber  22, 1815.  He  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  of  his 
father.   The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came 
to  Utah,  settling  in  Weber  county;    thence    to    Cache 
county,  and  later  removed  to  Bear  Lake,  where  his  par- 


264  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

ents  (lied.  Peter  left  home  at  the  age  of  20  and  lived  in 
Brigham  City  four  years,  then  in  Salt  Lake  City  till  '73, 
when  he  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  Avhere  he  has  since  resided 
and  engaged  in  farming  and  carpentering.  He  has  a  nice 
tv/enty-five-acre  farm.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
January  6,  '73,  to  Josephina  B.,  daughter  of  Jens  Neil- 
sen.  She  died  December  20,  '90,  leaving  one  child,  Han- 
nah C.  Married  again  November  2,  '95,  to  Annetta  C. 
Larsen,  nee  Peterson.  They  have  four  children:  Annie 
M.,  Josephine,  Lorina  and  Sevelina. 

PEEL,  PETER  M.,  i*etired  farmer,  son  of  Henning  H. 
and  Karen  C,  Avas  born  on  the  island  of  Bornholm, 
Denmark,  August  24,  1820.  He  leai^ned  blacksmith- 
iiig  and  emigrated  to  Utah,  coming  on  a  sailing  vessel  to 
New  Orleans,  u])  the  Mississippi  river  to  St.  Louis  and 
across  the  plains  by  ox-train,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake  City 
October  5,  1854,  and  locating  in  Lehi.  In  this  place  they 
lived  in  an  old  liut  covei-ed  with  poles  and  dirt,  which 
caved  in,  almost  killing  his  Avife.  He  came  to  Mt.  Plea- 
sant in  '59,  being  among  the  tirst  settlers,  and  assisted  in 
building  a  fort.  Took  up  twenty  acres  of  land  and  farmed 
it,  working  Aviuters  in  the  blacksmith  shop  till  three 
years  ago,  Avhen  he  retired.  In  the  past  he  served  as  a 
Bishop's  counsellor  and  member  of  the  first  City  Council. 
His  Avife  Avas  Christiana  Folkman,  bom  on  the  island  of 
Bornholm,  Denmark,  August  17,  1820.  They  were  mar- 
ried November  27,  1846,  and  celebrated  their  golden  wed- 
ding in  this  city.  Their  children  were:  Maggie,  wife  of 
Joliu  Seely;  Annie,  Avife  of  W.  D.  (^uidland,  living; 
Oiristina,  Cliristiania,  Christopher  F.,  Christian  F.  and 
Hannah  L.,  deceased. 

PETERSEN,  GEORGE  P.,  fanner  and  woolgrower,  son 
of  Lars  and  Annie  M.,  was  born  in  Denmark,  Janu- 
ary S,  1856.  The  family  joined  the  Monnon  church 
and  in  '66  emigrated  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt. 
RaAvlins'  company,  and  located  at  Moroni.  In  '69  they 
came  to  Fountain  Green,  where  mother  died  in  '94. 
Father  is  still  living,  at  the  advanced  age  of  94  years. 
George  P.  was  thrown  from  a  horse  when  15  years  of  age, 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  265 

breaking-  his  right  arm,  which  had  to  be  amputated.  He 
then  herded  cattle  seven  years  and  engaged  in  woolgrow- 
ing".  Xow  lias  3,000  sheep  and  a  good  farm  of  sixty-eight 
acres.  Is  a  part  owner  in  the  Phoenix  Flouring  Mill. 
Served  as  a  member  of  the  Town  Board  four  years.  He  is 
a  prominent  man  of  the  town.  Was  married  in  Fountain 
Green,  December  15,  '78,  to  Annie,  daughter  of  Hans  and 
Magdalene  Madsen,  born  in  Denmark,  September  14,  '60. 
They  have  five  children:  Annie  E.,  Sena  H.,  George  A., 
Louis  and  Mary  M.  In  June,  1898,  Mr.  Peterson  moved  to 
Mt.  Pleasant,  where  he  expects  to  make  his  home. 

PHIPPS,  ISAAC  X.,  fanner  and  gardener,  son  of  Isaac 
X.  and  Mary  E.,  was  born  in  Beaver  county,  Penn- 
sylvania, June  18,  1815.  He  came  to  Utah  in  '52  and 
located  in  West  Jordan  with  a  farmer  named  Joseph 
Smith.  In  the  fall  of  '61  he  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  took 
up  thirty  acres  of  land,  erected  a  home  and  has  since  re- 
sided here,  growing  small  fiiiits  and  vegetables  for  home 
market.  Is  a  member  of  the  Mormon  church.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Mt!  Pleasant,  December  21,  '76,  to  Emeline,  daugh- 
ter of  John  and  Jane  Tidwell,  born  in  Utah  county  in 
April,  '55.  They  have  six  children:  Louisa  J.,  Mary  E., 
Chasty  E.,  Sarah  A.,  Lettie  M.  and  Leo  R. 

I^ASMUSSEX,  MORTEX,  deceased,  son  of  Rasmus  and 
|T  ]Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark  October  27,  1831.  In 
*  1851  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  by  ox- 
train,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  He  worked  two  years  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  returning  to  Ephraim,  where  he  maiTied 
and  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  April,  1859,  assisting  in 
building  tJie  fort.  He  was  captain  of  a  company  in*  con- 
structing the  fort  walls.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  settled  on  a  home,  where  he  farmed  and 
engaged  in  lumbering.  He  was  interested  in  the  first 
sawmill;  was  a  member  of  the  City  Council  several  years; 
a  member  of  the  boai'd  of  county  commissioners  and  a 
ward  teacher  eighteen  years.  He  was  a  hard  worker  and 
assisted  in  organizing  some  of  the  early  companies  and 
industries,  being  a  dii^ctor  in  the  Co-op  store.  He  per- 
formed a  mission  to  Denmark  from  '81  to  '83.     Died  in 


266  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Mt,  Pleasant  June  28,  1885.  His  wife  was  Karn  M., 
daughter  of  Christian  X.  and  Margaret  Ohristiansen, 
born  in  Denmark  July  26,  1842,  They  were  married  in 
Ephraim  April  1,  1855),  and  had  twelve  children:  Morten, 
Sophia  M.,  Lars  C,  John,  Annie  M.,  Erastus,  Daniel  and 
Wilford,  living;  Mary,  Heni-y,  George  and  Hyrum,  de- 
ceased. 

f^ASMUSSEN,  MAKTIN,  agent  for  George  A.  Lowe, 
|*T      son  of  ^lartin  and  Karen  M.,  was  born  in  ^It.  Plea- 

V  sant  December  6,  1859.  At  the  time  of  his  birth  his 
parents  were  liviug  in  the  fort  and  he  is  probably  the  old- 
est resident  now  living  that  was  boiii  in  this  city.  He 
was  raiscxl  on  a  farm  and  now  owns  about  fifty  aci'es  and 
las  home  in  the  city.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant 
Koller  Mills.  In  1889  lie  accepted  the  agency  for  George 
A.  Low('  and  handles  all  kinds  of  farming  implements, 
machiueiw,  wagons  an<l  extias.  \\'as  maiTied  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  May  27,  1880,  to  Nicholena,  daughter  of  Andrew 
and  Nellie  Cliristensen.  They  had  tlnee  children:  Henry 
A.,  Martin  L.  and  Nellie  :\I.  \vif('  died  December  1,  1887, 
He  was  married  again  June  11,  1890,  to  EmmU  E.,  daugh- 
ter  of  William  and  Emma  Jeffs,  born  in  England  April 
12,  1859.  They  have  had  foui-  cliildren:  Caii'ie  and 
Jeneal,  living;  Rosetta  E.  and  Lucille,  deceased. 

r)EXPrR(;,  CHAKLES  M.,  of  Meyrick  &  Renburg, 
IT     sheep  gatherers,  son  of  Charles  C.  and  Mary  Larsen, 

V  was  born  in  ^It.  Pleasant  May  15,  1882.  His  parents 
came  from  Denmark  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1860, 
whei'e  his  father  died,  being  killed  by  the  Indians  in 
Gooseberry  Valley  dming  the  Black  Hawk  war  in  1865. 
He  was  quite  a  prominent  man  in  the  Mormon  church  as 
a  missionary  and  worker.  Mother  is  still  living  in  this 
city.  8he  accidentally  shot  out  the  palm  of  her  hand  by 
handling  a  loaded  gun  during  the  Indian  war.  Charles 
was  the  oldest  child  and  has  had  to  assist  in  caring  for 
the  family  by  herding  sheep  and  caattle  and  other  work. 
In  1894  the  company  of  Meyrick  &  Renburg  was  formed 
to  collect  estray  sheep  for  about  200  firms.     In  addition 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  267 

to  this  work  tiiey  buv  and  ship  hides  and  pelts.  Was 
married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Januaiy  1,  1891,  to  Christina, 
daughter  of  Jens  and  Maria  Gundersen,  born  in  Mt. 
Pleasant  January  29,  1870.  Thej  have  had  three  chil- 
dren:   Bertha  L.  and  Velaria,  living;  Veleto,  deceased. 

I^OLPH,  M.  G.,  pTOprletor  Mt.  Pleasant  Cigai'  Factory, 
jY     son  of  Mous  and  Bengta,  was  born  in  Sweden  De- 

V  cember  21,  18(51.  The  family  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant 
by  ox-traln  in  ISCG.  At  the  age  of  19  he  engaged  in  the 
mercantile  busine^^s  with  his  brother,  N.  A.,  who  died  in 
Xew  York  City  in  1886.  He  continued  the  business  till 
1892,  when  he  sold  out  and  purchased  sheep,  wliich  ven- 
ture Avas  not  a  success.  July  15,  1896,  he  opened  his  pres- 
ent cigar  facton",  where  he  employs  two  men  and  does  a 
good  business.  His  brands  are  Queen  City  Gem,  San- 
pete Famous,  Peerless  and  Honest  Five.  He  owns  the 
postoffice  building  and  a  place  on  eithei'  side  of  it.  Is  a 
member  of  the  A.  O.  U.  AV.,  holding  the  office  of  guide. 
Was  member  of  the  City  Council  four  years  and  Deputy 
United  States  Marshal  one  year.  Man'ied  in  Logan  April 
28,  1888,  to  Annie,  daughter  of  John  and  Karn  Knudsen. 
She  had  three  children:  Ettie,  Lucille  and  Annie,  and 
died  in  this  city  October  8,  1891. 

f^OLFSON,  JACOB,  deceased,  was  born  in  Norway. 
|T     He  joined  tlie  Mormon  church  and    emigrated  to 

V  Utah  in  '61,  stopping  in  Ephraim.  In  1862  he 
came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  he  resided  until  the  time  of 
his  death  in  1883.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
standing  guard  and  oing  his  shai'e.  In  1877  he  went  to 
Nor^^ay  on  a  two  years'  mission.  He  was  always  an 
active  worker  in  church  matters.  His  wife,  Margerethe, 
still  resides  in  ]\It.  Pleasant. 

P)OSENBUEG,  ALMA,  fanner,  son  of  Magnus  and  Jo- 
IT  hanna,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Februaiy  15,  1866. 
*  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and  for  the  past  twelve 
years  has  been  with  John  H.  Seely  and  in  the  last  seven 
years  has  been  foreman.  Was  mamed  in  Salt  Lake  City 
October  10,  1891,  to  Carrie,  daughter  of  Maria  Halverson, 


268  HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

They   have   two   children:   Glady-s,   born   June   7,    1893, 
and  Angus,  October  27,  1896. 

QOSENLOF,  MARTIN  A.,  carpenter,  son  of  Nils  and 
{X  Mary,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  October  22,  1862. 
*  He  w^as  brought  up  in  this  city,  worked  in  the 
mines  at  Bingham  and  elsewhere  and  learned  the  carpen- 
ter's trade.  Is  engaged  as  a  contractor  with  R.  Strom, 
and  has  assisted  in  erecting  many  of  the  large  business 
buildings  and  i^'sidences  of  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Mormon  chm'ch  and  is  intei'ested  in  woolgrow- 
ing.  AVas  married  in  Mamti  Temple  December  17,  1890, 
to  Nora,  daughter  of  Martin  and  Hannah  Aldrich,  bom 
in  Mt.  Pleasant  December  18,  1869.  They  have  one  child: 
\"ivian. 

i^OSENLOF,  NILS,  caiiienter,  son  of  Peter  and  Mary 
|T  Johansen,  was  born  in  Sweden  September  18,  1826. 
V  !!(>  learned  his  trade  in  Sweden,  joined  the  ^lormon 
church  and  emigrated  in  1860  to  the  Tinted  States  stop- 
ping in  Omaha.  In  1861  he  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox- 
train  under  Capt.  Murdock  and  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant, 
where  he  has  since  resided.  Took  part  in  the  J^lack 
Hawk  war  au<l  has  assisted  in  erecting  many  of  the 
buildings  in  this  city.  Is  one  of  the  Seventies'  quorum. 
Was  married  in  Sweden  to  Annie  M.,  daughter  of  Martin 
and  Annie  Johansen  Rosengren.  They  had  six  children: 
Olof,  John,  Albert,  Annie,  Frank  and  Fritz.  His  wife 
died  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1875.  Second  wife  was  Johanna, 
daughter  of  John  and  Martha  Torstenson  Stohl.  They 
had  seven  children:  Alfred,  Hilding,  Walter,  Levi,  Rinda, 
Ephraim  and  Ruby. 


QOSENLOF,  OLOF,  fanner,  was  born  in  Sweden  Feb- 
l\  ruary  5,  1851.  In  1860  the  family  came  to  the 
^  United  States,  stopping  one  year  in  Omaha.  They 
crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox-train,  settled  for  a  time  in 
Provo  and  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  the  fall  of  1861.  The 
family  then  consisted  of  parents,  Olof  and  brother  John. 
They  msided  in  the  fort  two  years.  When  he  was  15  he 
joined  the  bra.«s  band  and  was  alloted  ten  acres  of  land. 


MARTIN  ALDRK'H, 
MT.    Pl.KASANT. 


JACOB  HAFEN, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  269' 

Has  followed  farming  and  is  quite  extensively  interested 
in  woolgTowing.  He  was  one  of  the  first  stockholders  in 
the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank  and  is  now  a  director.  Is  a  direc- 
tor in  the  Electric  Light  Company  and  a  stockholder  in 
the  Mt.  Pleasant  Poller  Mills.  He  is  one  of  the  leading 
fanners  of  the  city.  AVas  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  Octo- 
ber 18,  1875,  to  Christina,  deughter  of  Hans  and  Caroline 
Simpson,  born  in  Lehi,  Utah,  April  17,  1858.  They  have 
eight  children:  Carrie,  Elzina,  Parley  O.,  Virgie,  Wil- 
liam, Abner,  Leo  and  Chrystal  P. 

SEELY,  JOHN  H.,  fanner,  stockraiser  and  wool- 
grower,  son  of  Justus  W.  and  Clarissa  J.,  was  bora 
in  San  Bernardino,  Cal.,  April  29,  1855.  The  family 
removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1859,  wher-e  he  was  educated 
and  gTew  up  a  farmer.  At  the  age  of  21  he  had  nothing 
and  made  a  start  at  hauling  mine  timbers  in  Bingham. 
He  secured  about  3,800  sheep  on  shares  and  at  the  end  of 
thi^e  years  had  about  10,000  head.  He  now  owns  about 
6,000  high-gTade  French  merinos,  having  expended  much 
in  breeding  both  sheep  and  cattle,  owning  200  head  bred 
from  Durliam.  Also  has  fifty  fine  Berkshire  hogs,  thor- 
oughbred Scotch  collie  dogs  and  Plymouth  Rock  chick- 
ens. Owns  a  good  home  in  the  city  and  has  several  hun- 
dred acres  of  land,  raising  about  2,000  bushels  of  grain 
and  cutting  600  tons  of  hay  annually.  Is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Roller  Mill  Company,  the  Electric 
Light  Company  and  Wool  and  Live  Stock  Commission 
Company,  assisting  in  their  organization.  He  owns  a 
sawmill  in  the  canyon  and  a  planing  mill  in  the  city.  Is 
a  Republican  in  politics,  a  member  of  the  A.  O.  V.  W.  and 
Avas  a  member  of  the  City  Council  for  six  years.  His  wife 
was  Margai'et,  daughter  of  Peter  M.  and  Christina  Folk- 
man  Peel,  born  in  Lehi  INlarch  1,  1858.  They  were  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City  January  15,  1880^  and  have  eight 
children:  Ethel  A.,  Zella  G.,  Earl  H.,  John  L.,  Leonard 
J.,  Arbretia  C,  Lucretia  V.  and  Chesley  P. 

SEELY,  JOSEPH,  farmer  and  lumberman,  son  of  Jus- 
tus W.  and  Clarissa.  J.,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
March  30,  1862.     He  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  on 
the  death  of  his  father  purchased  the  interest  of  some  of 


270  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

his  heirs,  thus  getting  a  fine  tract  of  seventy-four  acres, 
which  he  cultivates.  In  company  with  two  brothel's, 
John  and  Stuart,  he  owns  and  operates  the  Seely  saw- 
mill. Was  two  years  engaged  in  temple  work  and  per- 
formed a  mission  of  two  j^ears  to  Kentucky.  His  first 
wife  was  Sarah  H.,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Harriet 
Allen,  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  Septeaiber  o,  1804;  married 
in  I^ogau.  She  died  March  4,  1887,  leaving  one  child, 
Sarah  H.,  born  February-  15,  1887.  Second  wife  was 
Adella  E.,  daughter  of  Nils  and  Caroline  Olsen,  born  in 
Moroni  December  24,  1869.  They  were  married  in  Manti 
October  25,  1893,  and  have  three  children:  Joseph  F., 
born  September  0,  1894;  Justus  O.,  November  28,  1895, 
and  Adella  C,  April  14,  1897. 

$EELY,  JUSTUS  W.,  deceased,  son  of  Justus  A.  and 
Mehetable  Bennett,  was  born  in  Pickering,  Home 
District,  Upper  Canada,  Januarj'  30,  1815;  died  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  April  24,  1894.  He  learned  the  cooper's 
trade  from  his  father  in  Upper  Canada.  Joined  the  Mor- 
mon churcli  in  1837  and  Avent  to  Caldwell  county  Mo., 
August,  1838;  came  in  an  ox-train  to  Utah,  arriving  in 
Salt  Lake  City  September  30,  1847.  On  March  13,  1851, 
he  left  by  ox  team  for  San  Bernardino,  Oal.,  where  he  re- 
sided till  December,  1857,  when  he  returned  to  Pleasant 
Grove,  and  in  1859  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  assisting  in 
erecting  the  for-t.  In  1860  he  built  the  home  where  his 
wife  now  lesides.  He  assisted  in  putting  in  the  first 
steam  sawmill  in  the  canyon  and  was  in  that  business 
many  years.  The  first  mowing  machine,  horse  rake, 
twine  binder,  thresher  and  fanning  mill  purchased  in  the 
city  Avere  his.  He  served  as  bishop's  counsellor  seventeen 
years;  was  Justice  of  the  Peace  twenty  years;  member  of 
the  City  Council  twenty  years  and  Marshal  for  several 
years.  He  was  surgeon  and  dentist  for  the  town  for 
manj^  years,  pulling  teeth  and  setting  fractured  bones. 
His  wife,  whom  he  married  at  Galland,  Iowa,  March  10, 
1842,  was  Clarissa  Jane,  daughter  of  Hassard  and  Sarah 
Seely  Wilcox,  born  in  Caimi,  White  county,  111.,  October 
1,  1821.  They  had  three  children  born  in  Iowa:  Orange, 
Sarah  and   Don  Carlos,  who,  Avith  their  mother,  were 


HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  "  271 

awarded  pioneer  medals  at  the  Jubilee  in  1897.  Their 
other  children  Avere:  Hyrum,  Justus  W.,  William  H., 
John  H.,  Mary  M.,  David  A.,  Joseph  and  Stuart  R.  Sec- 
ond wife,  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  November  17,  1873, 
was  Sarah  J.  McKinney.     She  had  one  child,  Eva  E. 

SEELY,  MOKONI,  fanner  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Bishop  William  S.  and  Elizabeth  De  Hart,  was 
born  in  Salt  Lake  City  May  29,  1848.  The  family 
came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  1859  and  he  engaged  with  his 
father  in  riding  the  range.  In  1872  he  took  a  four-mule 
team  and  freighted  produce  to  the  mining  towns  of  Utah 
and  Nevada,  afterward  engaging  in  the  cattle  business, 
without  capital.  He  lived  in  Indianola  during  the  first 
three  years  of  ranging  and  then  removed  to  this  city, 
allowing  his  cattle  to  incr-ease  until  he  had  about  1,000 
head.  He  is  now  a  large  property  owner  in  the  city  and 
vicinity;  has  about  200  acres  of  land  beside  city  property 
and  about  400  sheep.  His  wife  was  Alice,  daughter  of 
John  and  Susaainah  Barton,  born  in  Bountiful,  Utah, 
May  2,  1850.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  April 
10,  1872,  and  have  nine  children:  Alice  V.,  Cyrus  M., 
Clara,  George  L.,  Lucinda  M.,  Orson  E.,  Mell  Gay,  Arta 
J.  and  Catherine  Verda. 

SEELY,  STUART  E.,  farmer,  son  of  Justus  W.  and 
Clarissa  J.,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  February  16, 
1865.  He  was  raised  a  farmer  and  has  followed 
that  work  with  other  occupations.  In  1890  he  and  his 
brothers  John  and  Joseph  built  a  sawmill  in  Ralston 
canyon,  where  he  has  worked  at  getting  out  timber.  He 
owns  a  farm  of  seventy-five  acres,  three  miles  north  of 
the  city,  where  he  erected  a  home  in  1894,  and  tills  the 
soil  and  raises  stock.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in 
Manti  July  16,  1894,  was  Millie,  daughter  of  Fred  and 
Christina  Nielson.  They  have  one  child,  FerryR.,  bom 
February  14,  1895. 

SEELY,    BISHOP    WILLIAM    S.,    deceased,    of    Mt. 
Pleasant,  was  a  native  of  Upper  Canada,  born  in 
Pickering,  Home  district.  May  18,  1812.    His  par- 
ents were  Justus  A.  and  Mehittabel  Bennet  Seely.     He 


272  •  HISTORY   OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

joined  the  Mormon  churcli  in  1838  and  came  to  Utah 
with  the  pioneers  of  1847.  He  lived  for  a  time  in  Salt 
Lake  Cit^ ,  Pleasant  Grove,  and  was  one  of  the  first  set- 
tlers in  Mt.  Pleasant,  in  1859.  He  was  bishop  thirty 
years,  Mayor  several  years,  took  part  all  through  the 
Black  Hawk  war,  filled  two  missions  to  Canada,  going 
in  1873  and  again  in  1878.  He  had  three  wives,  two  of 
whom  are  still  living.  His  first  wife  was  Elizabeth  De 
Hart,  who  died  April  6,  1873.  Six  children  are  living, 
Elizabeth,  Emily,  Moroni,  Emeline,  Joseph  X.  and  Lu- 
cinda.  Second  wife  was  Ellen  Jackson,  the  children  are, 
Justus  L.  and  Willi;nii  S.  Third  wife  was  Ann  Watkins, 
and  her  children  are  William  A.  and  Anna  E.  Bishop 
Seely  was  an  active  and  prominent  citizen  in  local  af- 
fairs and  well  and  favorably  known  throughout  the 
State.     He  died  September  17,  1806. 

Cl^HULTZ,  HANS  J.  H.,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  H.  and 
^^  Anna  M.  Jorgensen,  was  born  in  Junland,  Den- 
mai'k,  July  18,  1811.  At  the  age  of  11  he  joined  the 
Mormon  cliurch,  and  being  well  educated,  taught  the 
English  kuiguage  to  those  intending  to  emigrate  to  the 
United  States.  Was  engaged  in  teaching  eiaigrants  for 
three  years.  In  1863  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
by  ox-train  in  Capt.  Young's  company,  and  located  in 
Mt.  Pleasant.  He  engaged  in  fanning,  bought  a  small 
farm  and  now  owns  fift^^-five  acres.  SVas  active  during 
the  Black  Hawk  Avar,  doing  his  shai'e'  of  guarding. 
Taught  school  for  two  winters.  Was  for  manj^  years 
a  member  of  the  Elders'  quoi-um.  His  mother  came  with 
him  and  still  resides  at  his  home.  She  was  born  June 
27,  1807. 

SIMPSON,  HANS  J.,  one  of  the  oldest  settletrs  of  Mt. 
Pleasant,  son  of  James  and  Amelia,  was  born  in 
Denmark  January  12,  1824.  In  1851  he  emigrated  to 
Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capt, 
Olsen.  He  lived  in  Salt  Lake  City  till  1858,  then  removed 
to  Ephraim,  and  ont  April  10,  1859,  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant, 
assisting  in  building  the  fort,  and  lived  in  it  for  one  year. 
He  ei'ected  a  log  house  where  his  present  residence  is, 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  273 

took  up  twenty  acres  of  laud  aud  has  Loutimied  farmiug. 
Now  owus  a  nice  farm  of  fifty  acres.  Took  an  active  paort 
in  the  Bla.ck  llawk  war;  cairiied  express  for  some  time. 
Served  as  a  waid  teacliei^  for  ovei'  tldrty-live  years  and 
was  ordained  a.  high  priest.  AVa.s  mariied  in  Salt  Lake 
City  September  13,  1855,  to  Cai^oline,  daughter  of  Hen- 
ning  P.  aiid  Karen  C.  Peal,  born  in  Denmark  March  5, 
1836.  Her  parents  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  1860 
in  this  city.  They  have  ten  children:  Ohristina,  Mary, 
Caroline,  Millie,  James,  Peter,  Hannah,  Ohristian  and 
Mina,  living;  Joseph,  deceased. 

gOKENSEN,  O.  W.,  teacher  in  public  schools,  son  of 
Christian  and  Christina,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
November  1,  1803.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  at- 
tending school  in  winters,  and  at  the  age  of  20  entered 
the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo,  taking  a  two  years'  course. 
Has  taught  school  in  this  city  ever  since,  except  '92  and 
'94,  Avhen  he  perform (h1  a  mission  to  Aarhus,  Denmark, 
presiding  over  that  conference.  Was  principal  of  the  pub- 
lic schools  in  '91.  AVas  City  Pecorder  two  years.  City  As- 
sessor and  Collector  four  years,  and  in  '97  was  elected  a 
member  of  the  City  Council.  He  carries  on  farming  to 
some  extent.  Was  married  in  iNIt.  Pleasant,  March  1, 
1885,  to  Dena,  daughter  of  Christian  and  Cidsel  M.  Han- 
sen. Her  parents  came  to  Utah  in  '58  w^ith  the  first  Scan- 
dinavians. Wife  died  September  25,  1888.  He  manied 
again  in  Mauti,  June  21,  '91,  to  Eva,  daughter  of  Jorgen 
and  Hannah  Madsen,  born  in  Manti,  April  12,  '72.  They 
have  had  two  children:  Luella,  born  April  4,  1892,  died 
February  27,  '97,  and  Piiby  Y.,  born  June  19,  '96. 

§  TAKER,  JAMES  B.,  of  the  firm  of  Staker  &  Hansen, 
planing  mill,  son  of  Nathan  and  Eliza,  was  born  in 
Pleasant  Grove,  Utah,  February  7,  1858.  The  fam- 
ily removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59,  his  father  taking  an 
active  part  in  the  Black  Hawdv  war,  and  being  prominent 
iL*  church  matters  as  president  of  the  High  Priests.  He 
died  in  this  city  March  29,  1884.  James  was  raised  a  far- 
mer, and  now  owms  a  fine  farm  of  100  acres.  He  is  a  mem- 


274  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

ber  of  the  A.  O.  U.  W.  In  '92  the  planing  mill  firm  of 
Hansen,  Staker  &  Johnson  began  business,  owning  also 
a  sawmill.  In  '95  the  firm  changed  to  Staker  &  Hansen, 
James  running  the  mill  most  all  the  time  since.  They 
have  a  good  plant  costing  about  $5,000,  and  manufacture 
rustic,  ceiling,  flooring,  mouldings,  with  scroll  sawing 
and  turning.  The  fii-ni  assisted  in  organizing  the  Queen 
City  Eoller  ^filln.  Company.  He  was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  June  10,  1880,  to  Elizabeth  C,  daughter  of  John  P. 
and  Elizabeth  Fechser,  bom  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  January  30, 
1861.  They  have  had  seven  children :  Elizabeth  C,  Eliza 
M.,  James  B.,  Grace  P.,  John  P.,  Plossie  R.  and  Meddie 
C,  living;   Nathan  J.,  deceased. 

5TI?0M,  JOHN  E.,  cai-penter,  son  of  Joseph  and  Maria, 
was  born  in  Sweden,  October  16,  1844.  He  learned 
the  carpenter's  trade.  Joined  the  Mormon  church 
and  in  '70  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  where  he  has  since  fol- 
lowed his  trade.  Was  engaged  in  the  undertaker's  busi- 
ness for  fifteen  years.  Was  a  large  stockholder  and  a 
director  in  the  Co-op.  store  until  it  failed.  Is  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Mt.  Pleasant  bank,  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Roller 
Mills  and  the  Electric  Light  Company.  His  wife,  whom 
he  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  13,  1872,  was 
Sophia  M.  Ohman,  born  in  Sweden.  She  died  in  Mt.  Plea^ 
sant,  May  4,  1894. 

5TROM,  RI'DOLPH,  carpenter,  son  of  John  E.  and 
Sopliia,  Avas  born  in  Upsala,  Sweden,  January  22, 
18(52.  In  '72  the  family  came  to  Utah  and  located  in 
Mt.  Pleasant.  He  was  raised  here  and  learned  the  carpen- 
ter's trade,  which  he  now  follows.  During  the  past  six 
years  he  and  Albert  Rosenlof  have  worked  together,  as- 
sisting in  the  construction  of  many  of  the  prominent 
buildings  of  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  one  term.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  October  10, 
1886,  to  Louisa,  daughter  of  August  and  Mary  Rauche, 
born  in  Predrikshald,  Norway,  February  17,  1864.  They 
have  three  children:  Theresa,  born  July  2,  '87;  John  A., 
February  24,  '89,  and  Olga,  November  7,  '91. 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  275 

5YNDERGAAKD,  A.  J.,  farmer,  sou  of  James  C.  and 
Annie  K.,  ^\-as  born  in  Denmark,  in  the  village  of 
Sunby,  Ma}^  11,  1851.  His  father  died  when  he  was 
a  boy  of  7,  and  his  mother,  with  two  sons  and  tAVO  daugh- 
ters, came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  un- 
der Capt.  Madsen,  arriving  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  October, 
'62.  They  bought  a  farm  aud  the  boys  worked  it.  He  now 
owns  a  good  forty-five-acre  farm.  Was  a  policeman  in 
this  city  seA^eral  years  and  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
one  year.  His  wife  was  Maria,  daughter  of  Niels  and 
Christiana  Johansen,  born  in  Aalborg,  Denmark,  June  2, 
1850.  Her  parents  were  old  residents  of  Mt.  Pleasant. 
A.  J.  and  INIaria  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  in  Octo- 
ber, '69,  and  liave  had  thirteen  children:  Gertrude,  Kate, 
Anna  M.,  Hyrum,  Anthony,  James,  Olive,  Parley  and 
Hortense,  living;  Christina,  Andrew,  Lars  and  Joseph, 
deceased. 

!  I  AlLL,  AUGUST,  retired  carpenter,  son  of  Carl  F. 
\XJ  and  Katrina,  was  born  in  Sweden,  August  8, 
1839.  He  learned  the  cai-penter's  trade  in  Sweden, 
joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  to  I~^tah  in  '64, 
locating  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  His  parents  and  sister  came 
here  in  '63.  Both  parents  are  now  dead.  He  worked  at  his 
ti-ade  till  '90,  when  he  retired  from  active  life.  When  the 
Sanpete  County  Co-op.  store  was  started  in  '73  he  became 
a  shareholder,  and  has  seen  the  business  grow  until  it  is 
the  largest  of  the  kind  in  the  county.  Has  three  sons  en- 
gaged in  the  store.  He  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt . 
Pleasant  bank.  Was  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  February 
2,  1869,  to  Hannah  Neilson,  born  in  Sweden,  December 
14,  1842.  They  have  four  sons  living:  Oscar  F.,  cashier  of 
the  bank;  August  C,  Edward  W.  and  Henry  F.,  clerks  in 
Sanpete  County  Co-op.  store. 

1  I  AvLDEMAR,  AXEL  B.,  City  Watermaster,  son  of 
\XJ  James  and  Nellie,  was  born  in  Sweden,  January 
22,  1862.  He  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '73,  residing 
wath  his  uncle,  Neils  Waldemar,  till  at  the  age  of  16  he 
started  out  for  himself.  He  worked  at  different  mining 
camps  and  on  railroads  until  he  was  married  and  settled 


276  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

down  in  this  city.  In  '96  he  was  appointed  City  Water- 
master,  which  position  he  still  holds,  giving  good  satis- 
faction. Is  a  member  of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Lodge  No.  20, 
I.  O.  O.  F.,  in  which  he  was  Noble  Grand  in  '97.  His  wife, 
whom  he  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  October  22,  1890,  was 
Annie  C,  daughter  of  George  and  Martha  O.  Tuft,  bom  in 
Mt.  Pleasant,  June  2,  1872.  They  have  two  children: 
Ariel,  bom  July  31,  '91,  and  Neva,  October  14,  '93. 

1  f  AVLDEMAK,  JOHN,  farmer,  son  of  Asmund  and 
\XJ  Hannah,  was  born  in  Sweden  September  12, 
1837.  He  studied  music  and  became  a  good  per- 
former on  the  violin,  flute  and  cornet.  Also  learned  the 
trade  of  brickmaker.  Joined  the  ]Mormon  church  and 
came  to  Utah  in  1859,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train 
under  Capt.  Ne«len,  and  located  in  Mt.  Pleasant.  As^ 
sisted  in  building  the  fort  walls  and  lived  in  a  dugout  in- 
side. He  worked  at  liis  trade  and  played  in  the  Taberna- 
cle choir  for  many  years.  Had  a  meat  market  several 
years  and  stai-ted  the  Sanpete  County  Co^op  store,  being 
secretary  for  a  time  and  connected  with  the  store  till 
1886.  He  was  active  as  a  minute  man  in  Capt.  Day's  com- 
pany (luring  tliie  Black  Ihnvk  war.  Seiwed  as  a  member 
of  the  City  Council  two  years.  Owns  a  nice  farm  of  fifty 
acres  and  a  good  home  north  of  the  city.  Was  firet  mar- 
ried in  INlt.  Pleasant  March  19,  1862,  to'  Sophia,  daughter 
of  Andrew  and  Ingreed  ^lencMir,  a  native  of  Sweden. 
Second  ^vife  was  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Inge- 
bord  Eriksen,  bom  May  10,  1863.  She  had  eleven  chil- 
dren: John  L.,  Elizabeth  E.,  Hannah,  Louis  F.,  Nels  A., 
Ella  C,  James  A.,  Erick  and  Kalph  L.,  living;  Henry  E. 
and  Ada.  H.,  deceased. 

1  f  ^EST,  THOMAS,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
\XJ  Thomas  and  Harriet  Moore,  was  born  in  St 
Joseph,  Mo.,  October  1,  1853.  Father  died  in 
Missouri,  the  mother  with  Thomas  and  sister  Elizabeth 
coming  to  Utah  in  1855.  They  located  in  Salt  Lake, 
whei^  his  mothei'  maiTied  Sam  Allen,  removing  to  Prove, 
thence  to  :Mt.  Pleasant  in  1863.  When  18  years  of  age 
Thomas  started  out  for  himself,  working  for  three  years 


I 


J.    G     CHRISTENSICX, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


THOMAS  M^EST, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HISTORY   OF  SANPETE   COUNTY.  277 

at  railroading  and  in  mining  camps.  He  returned  to  this 
city,  purchased  a  forty-acre  fami  in  Chester,  built  a 
house  and  added  to  his  farm  till  he  now  has  about  200 
acres.  In  1895  he  moved  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  engaged 
in  thie  sheep  business  in  1888  and  has  about  3,000  head. 
Was  one  of  the  organizers  and  a  director  of  the  OhesteT 
Eeservoir  and  Ditch  Company  and  later  treasurer  and 
superintendent.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Mt.  Pleasant 
Electric  Light  Company,  the  Queen  City  Eoller  Mill  Com- 
pany, of  which  he  was  president  two  years,  and  the  Cen- 
tral Utah  AVool  Company  at  Manti.  His  wife,  whom  he 
married  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  was  Emma^  dauglitei'  of  Isaac 
and  Emma  Alli'ed,  born  in  Ogden  October  15,  1857.  They 
hare  five  children:  Grace,  Wilford,  Idella,  Zella  and 
Eay. 

1  I  ^HITTAKER,  PICHAED,  wool  and  sheep-buyer, 
\XJ  ^^"^^^  born  near  jNIanchester,  England,  July  5, 
1857.  He  came  toi  Utah  in  1872,  located  in  Salt 
Lake  City  and  socm  engaged  in  the  sheep  and  cattle  busi- 
ne'ss  in  the  employ  of  James  D.  Powell  of  Lehi,  where  he 
spent  several  years.  Was  afterwards  foreman  for  Jonas 
Ereksou  for  ten  years,  then  engaged  in  the  business  for 
himself,  his  dealings  being  very  extensive.  During  the 
last  few  years  he  has  given  his  attention  to  buying  and 
shipping  wool  and  sheep.  He  has  also  been  interested 
for  the  past  eighteen  years  in  mining  in  the  West  Tintic 
district.  Is  manager  of  the  Burlington  Mining  Company, 
which  owns  a  group  of  fine  claims,  which  is  being  devel- 
oped, taking  out  a,  large  amount  of  low-grade  ore.  He 
is  also  interested  with  A.  A.  Cahoon  in  copper  claims  in 
the  Deseret  Mining  district.  He  has  a  large  dipping  and 
shearing  con'-al  in  Thistle  Valley.  Is  a  member  of  the 
A.  O.  U.  W.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  in  Mt.  Pleasant, 
was  Ida  Waldemar,  a  native  of  Sweden.  They  have  three 
children:    Viola  ,Indra  and  Aleue. 

\\  I   ILCOX,  CANDACE  B.,  City  Treasurer,  daughter 

^■^        of  C.  C.  and  Mary  N.  Kowe,  was  born  in  Fremont, 

Iowa,  July  24,  1857.    In  1852  the  family  came  to 

Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt,  Jolley's  train,  locating 


278  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

in  Payson  till  1860,  when  they  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant. 
Her  father  was  a  member  of  Company  A  of  the  Mormon 
Battalion  and  receiAes  a  pension  from  the  Government. 
He  was  active  in  the  Walker  war,  being  Second  Lieuten- 
ant, Company  B  of  Payson  Post,  NanvoO'  Legion,  In  the 
Black  Hawk  Avar  he  was  Second  Lieutenant  in  the  Silver 
Greys.  Cauda ce  Avas  married  to  Joseph  Wilcox,  a  farmer 
of  this  city.  He  died  in  Mt.  Pleasant  December  30,  1888. 
She  was  elected  City  Tteasm'er  on  the  Democratic  ticket 
at  the  election  of  XoAember,  1897.  Her  children  are: 
Mary  M.,  Isabella  C,  Annie,  .Joseph  W.,  David,  Benjamin 
F.,  Hyrum  ^^^  and  Bessie  J. 

I  I  f  ILCOX,  JOHN  HENRY,  famier,  Avas  born  in  Ar- 
\XJ  kansas  Februaiw  14,  1824.  The  family  removed 
to  Ma  lion  couuty.  Mo.,  where  his  father  died. 
His  motlier  joined  the  Mormon  clutrch  in  Clarion  cotinty, 
moved  to  Jackson  count}',  then  to  Clay,  then  to  CaldAveli 
and  Lee  counties,  Mo.,  then  going  to  Lee  county,  Iowa, 
from  Avhich  tliey  departed  for  Salt  Lake  City  in  ox  team 
Avith  eTohn  Taylor,  arriving  September  80,  1847.  In  1850 
John  remoA'ed  to  Manti,  thence  to  Pleasant  Grove  and 
North  Ogden,  and  in  1800  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  took 
up  twenty  acres  of  land,  Avhich  he  still  owns,  Avith  his  res- 
idence in  tlie  city.  When  the  Walker  Avar  broke  out  he 
Avorked  in  Pleasant  Creek  canyon  and  lost  his  wagon 
and  lumber  and  two  yoke  of  oxen.  He  took  an  active 
part  in  the  Indian  Avar.  His  wife  Avas  Mary,  daughter  of 
James  and  Elizabeth  Seely  Young,  born  in  Upper  Can- 
ada, June  6,  1831.  She  drove  three  yoke  of  oxen  across 
the  plains,  assisted  in  hauling  logs  to  build  her  parents' 
home  and  moulded  the  adobes  for  the  chimne3^  They 
were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  March  14,  1848.  Their 
children  are:  Hassard,  Elizabeth,  Sarah,  James  H.,  John 
C,  Mary,  Clarissa,  Ella,  Hannah,  Martha  and  Justus. 

1  !  /  INTERS,  MORGAN  A.,  farmer,  son  of  Hyrum  A. 
VjLy  and  Elizabeth,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant,  Novem- 
ber 30,  1863.  His  parents  came  to  Mt.  Pleasant 
in  '61,  where  his  father  studied  medical  works  and  was  a 
practicing    phj^sician    for    several   years.     Morgan    was 


\ 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  279 

brought  up  a  farmer  and  became  interested  in  woolgrow- 
ing.  He  was  engaged  in  the  sheep  business  for  eight 
years,  owning  as  many  as  7,000  head,  when  he  sold  out 
and  returned  to  the  farm.  He  now  has  a  nice  farm  of 
about  thirty-seven  acres  southeast  of  the  city.  His  wife 
was  Lydia,  daughter  of  Daniel  F.  and  Susan  B.  Tebbs, 
born  in  Cedar  Fort,  Utah,  Sept.  20,  1867.  She  is  engaged 
in  the  millinery  business  and  has  a  good,  choice  stock  of 
goods.  They  were  married  in  Panguitch,  August  6,  '89, 
and  have  one  child.  Usher. 

1  I  ^OODKING,  WILLIAM  W.,  M.  D.,  son  of  Jacob  and 
\XJ  Mary  A.  Hahn,  was  born  in  Elizabethtown,  Ky., 
May  25,  1841.  He  was  raised  in  Kentucky  and 
attended  the  Louisville  School  of  Physicians,  the  Miami 
of  Cincinnati,  the  National  University  of  Chicago  and  the 
Medical  University  of  Kansas  City.  He  served  in  the 
Civil  War  two  years  and  nine  months,  holding  the  rank 
of  Captain  of  Fourth  Kentucky  Infantry,  on  the  Confed- 
erate side,  and  saw  much  of  active  military  service.  Has 
practiced  medicine  in  Bedford,  Ind. ;  Independence,  Kan. ; 
Kansas  City,  Mo.,  and  in  '87  came  to  Utah,  locating  at 
Moroni  for  eighteen  months,  when  he  came  to  Mt.  Plea- 
sant, where  he  has  a  fine  practice  and  is  well  liked.  He  is 
a  Mason  of  high  degree,  a  Shriner  since  '69  and  an  Odd 
Fellow  since  '72.  Has  been  a  continuous  member  of  a 
medical  society  for  thirty-one  years.  Is  a  prominent  and 
active  Democrat,  always  taking  a  leading  part  in  Na- 
tional affairs.  Was  a  delegate  from  Kansas  to  Cincinnati 
and  helped  nominate  Gen.  Hancock  for  the  Presidency. 
In  Utah  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  State  Central  and 
Executive  Committees  three  years.  Is  United  States  Pen- 
sion Examiner,  having  served  in  that  capacity  fourteen 
years.  He  has  a  large  practice  and  spends  Thursday  of 
each  week  in  Moroni.  Was  married  in  Bedford,  Ind.,  Aug- 
ust 17, 1867,  to  Phoebe  Ray,  a  native  of  Indiana,  who  died 
in  Kansas,  leaving  four  children:  Samuel  H.,  a  lumber 
merchant  in  Texarkana,  Tex.;  Willie  H.,  a  pharmacist 
and  proprietor  Woodring's  Pharmacy,  Salt  Lake  City, 
living;  James  H.  and  Lyre,  deceased.  Second  wife  was 
yj.HTY  V.  Snauffer,  a  native  of  Maryland.    She  had  four 


280  HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY. 

children:  John  J.,  one  of  the  proprietors  of  The  Pyramid; 
S.  Lewis,  a  pharmacist,  and  Mary  C,  living;  William  W., 
deceased, 

ZABEISKIE,  WILLIAM,  fanner,  son  of  L.  C.  and  Mary 
Higbee,  was  born  in  Quincy,  111.,  September  13, 1839. 
The  family  crossed  the  plans  in  '51  in  Eoswell  Ste- 
vens' company,  and  settled  in  Provo,  where  they  lived 
nine  years.  In  the  spring  of  '60  they  located  in  Fairv'iew. 
He  took  part  in  the  Walker  and  Blackhawk  wars,  being 
in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59,  finally  locating  here  in  '64,  where 
he  opened  a  store  and  conducted  it  till  '70;  engaged  in 
mining  two  years  and  entered  the  law  office  of  K.  H. 
Kobertson  in  Salt  Lake  City.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar 
in  Provo,  March  27,  1876,  and  has  practiced  in  this  city 
and  the  District  Court  until  about  two  years  ago.  Was 
L"^nited  States  Commissioner  about  six  years.  He  incor- 
porated the  Mt.  Pleasant  Milling  Company,  of  Avhich 
he  was  secretary;  also  the  Moroni  and  Mt.  Pleasant  Irri- 
gation and  Ditch  Company,  being  secretary  and  now  a 
director.  He  procured  the  franchise  and  effected  the  in- 
corporation of  the  Mt.  Pleasant  Electric  Light  Company, 
of  which  he  is  a  stockholder.  His  wife,  whom  he  married  ^ 
at  Fairview,  August  20, 1859,  was  Christine  Nelson.  They  Jl 
have  seven  children:  William  H.,  Helena,  Isaac  N.,  Char- 
lotte, Ida,  Lewis  C.  and  Edward  A. 


EPHRAIM. 


EPHRAIM  is  situated  near  the  geographical  center 
of  Sanpete  count}^,  seven  miles  northeast  of  Manti 
and  lis  miles  south  of  Salt  l^ake  City.  The  loca- 
tion is  a  beautiful  elevation  near  the  base  of  the  Wasatch 
mountains,  commanding  a  pleasant  view  of  the  greater 
portion  of  the  famous  granary  of  Utah.  It  is  the  second 
city  in  the  county  in  age,  the  third  in  population  and  oc- 
cupies about  equal  prominence  with  competitors  in  com- 
mercial transactions  and  business  qualifications.  Being 
at  the  point  of  intersection  of  the  Rio  Grande  Western 
and  Sanpete  Valley  railroads  the  place  is  commonly 
known  as  the  "Junction  City  of  Sanpete."  The  city  is 
surrounded  by  the  evidences  of  agricultural  prosperity, 
with  10,000  acres  of  magnificent  farais,  yielding  immense 
crops  of  golden  grain,  for  suf>plying  the  home  demand 
for  bread,  and  furnishing  many  carloads  every  year  for 
exporting  to  otlier  less  favored  sections. 

The  first  attempt  at  making  a  settlement  on  the 
present  site  of  Ephraim  was  made  in  the  fall  of  1850, 
by  Isaac  Behunnin,  one  of  the  Sanpete  pioneers  of  '49, 
who  observed  that  "Pine  creek  had  more  water  and  the 
location  was  better  for  a  town  than  anywhere  in  the 
valley."  He  met  with  much  opposition,  however,  from 
the  wily  InSIans^  who  did  not  appreciate  his  efforts  at 
ditch  building  and  cultivating  the  soil.  The  red  men 
forced  him  to  return  to  Manti  and  await  reinforcements 
before  converting  the  desert  into  its  present  land  of 
paradise.  Many  of  the  original  pioneers  of  the  valley 
looked  upon  this  chosen  spot  as  a  most  desirable  loca- 
tion but  could  not  collect  a  sufficient  band  of  fearless 
veterans  toin&ure  personal  safety  until  1854^_. 

In  early  spring  of  this  year  (1854)  Reuben  W.  Allred 
withi  fifteen  families  located  the  site  of  Ephraim  and 
began  the  erection  of  homes  and  cultivating  the  soil. 


•282  HISTORY    OF    SAKPETE    COUNTV. 

These  hardy  sons  and  dauj^hters  of  civilization  had  at- 
tempted a  settlement  at  Spring-  City  the  previous  year, 
but  were  driven  away  bj'  Indians.  The  fort  they  had 
constructed  was  burned  and  the  savages  destroyed  every 
vestige  of  colonization,  thinking  the  people  would  never 
leave  the  fort  at  Manti.  But,  the  land  and  water  and 
delightful  situation  for  a  colony  impelled  those  home- 
seekers  to  pitch  tents  on  Ephraim  fields  and  the  present 
magniticent  city  proves  conclusively  their  efforts  were 
not  in  vain.  _Here_are_coJukined.  a  delightful  climate, 
pure  mountjiiiL_YaiJt£JV-f<i^il^  soil  and  a  progressive,  in- 
dustrioiisand  contented  population. 

The  first  two  years  in  tin-  history  of  Ephraim  were 
days  of  disa]t])oiutui(Mits  and  tiibulatious  such  as  none 
but  the  most  determined  men  and  women  could  endure. 
Frost  killed  the  first  crop  of  grain  and  grasshoppers  de- 
stroyed almost  every  other  species  of  vegetation.  The 
Indians  prowled  'round  day  and  night  and  attacked 
herders  and  wood  haulers  when  found  alone  or  a  few 
hundred  yards  from  tlu  settlement.  A  fort  was  con- 
structed as  soon  as  possible  and  houses  built  inside  to 
protect  the  people  nnd  shelter  the  stock  from  Indian 
depredations.  On  July  4,  1854,  the  first  celebration  of 
Ind(^pendence  day  in  tliis  city,  Henry  Beal  and  Mary 
Thorpe  were  man-ied,  being  the  first  couple  united  in 
matrimony  within  the  new  colony.  The  small  fort  was 
completed  this  season  and  people  went  into  winter  quar- 
ters. 

During  the  fall  of  '54  a  number  of  Scandinavian 
families  were  sent  from  Salt  Lake  City  to  join  the  colony 
and  strengthen  it  against  the  Indian  foes.  The  small 
group  of  homeless  i)eople  I'emained  in  the  fort  through 
a  long,  severe  winter,  with  many  vexatious  troubles  to 
combat,  but  notwithstanding  the  combinations  of  hunger, 
cold  and  Indian  hostilities,  they  enjoyed  excellent  health 
and  the  following  spring  found  them  in  good  spirits, 
ready  to  continue  the  work  of  conquering  the  desert  and 
building  homes  in  the  midst  of  poverty  and  savage  ene- 
mies. A  second  and  larger  fort  was  erected  in  '55,  but 
the  grasshoppers  did  not  respect  even  this  effort  at  self 
preservation,  for  they  came  by  the  millions  and  greedily 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  283 

deYourecl  ererything  upon  which  they  alighted.  Men, 
women  and  cliiklren  became  warriors  in  the  battle  for 
bread  and  fought  day  and  night  to  destroy  the  pests. 

The  co-operative  plan  was  adopted  by  the  original 
colonists  and  one  common  field,  irrigated  from  the  waters 
of  Pine  creek,  through  union  ditches,  was  occupied.  In 
*57  a  bountiful  harvest  crowned  the  efforts  of  the  sturdy 
husbandmen  and  the  granaries  were  filled  with  an  abund- 
ance of  the  staff  of  life.  Keuben  W.  Allred  was  the  pre- 
siding bishop  and  instituted  schools  and  social  amuse- 
ments for  the  educating  and  interesting  of  old  and  young, 
and  the  time  passed  more  pleasantly  and  comfortably 
than  the  preceding  winters.  During  the  three  winters 
following  the  loss  of  crops,  provisions  were  scarce  and 
the  small  food  supply  had  to  be  carefully  hoarded  and 
divided  among  the  people,  but  with  the  good  crop  of  '57 
a  change  came  over  the  struggling  colonists  and  they  re- 
joiced at  the  dawning  of  prosperity.  In  1860  the  city 
lots  were  surveyed  and  the  families  left  the  forts  to  build 
homes  upon  their  own  land,  which  was  divided  and  pro- 
portioned as  in  other  early  settlements  of  Utah.  No 
elegant  mansions  were  constructed  but  the  houses  were 
built  of  logs  and  adobes  or  stone  as  each  family  could 
afford,  and  individual  work  began  to  be  placed  upon 
the  several  properties.  Men  engaged  in  farming  and 
stock-raising  and  have  continued  at  that  work  until  the 
present  comfortable  homes,  rich  fields  and  fine  barns 
show  the  effects  of  well-directed  energy  and  thorough 
mastery  of  the  details  of  business.  The  natural  facili- 
ties were  such  as  to  develop  the  inert  powers  of  man- 
hood and  create  a  bond  of  friendship  entirely  foreign  to 
deceitfulness  and  self-aggrandizement,  hence  Ephraim 
grew  and  prospered  by  honesty  and  industry. 

A  company  of  Ephraim  citizens  was  called  in  1865 
to  settle  Circle  Valley  and  educate  the  Indians  to  the 
American  customs  of  agricultural  peace.  They  built 
houses,  constructed  irrigating  ditches  and  cleared  land 
preparatory  to  conquering  the  desert  and  making  homes, 
but  the  Indians  decided  their  presence  was  too  much 
indication  of  approaching  civilization.  In  November, 
after  the  colonists  were  settled  for  the  -^dnter,  the  In- 


"84  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY, 

•diaus  raided  the  settleiiieiit,  killed  .some  of  the  people 
and  drove  aA\  ay  the  stock.  The  next  spring-  repeated 
raids  were  made  and  in  July,  180G,  the  place  was  aban- 
doned and  the  settlers  returned  to  Ephraim,  every  family 
losing  almost  everything  they  possessed.  They  began 
life  anew  in  E]>hraim  and  today  many  i\re  among  the 
wealthiest   and   most  respected     fandlies    of    the     city. 

Ephraim  was  incorporated  as  a  city  February  14, 
1868,  with  an  area  of  one  and  one-half  square  miles.  The 
conservative  policy  adopted  by  the  se^^eral  municipal  au- 
thorities is  still  a.  remarkable  characteristic  and  in  con- 
sequence, the  city  has  no  indebtedness;  taxes  are  low; 
contagious  and  epidemic  diseases  are  practically  un- 
known, because  of  the  ditches  and  streets  being  kept 
■clean  and  «|iiarantine  nu^asures  strictly  enforced.  The 
present  })o])ulatioii  consists  of  about  3000  people,  engaged 
chietly  in  agricultural  pursuits  and  kindred  occupations. 
Ephraim  now  has  numerous  mercantile  houses;  good 
hotels;  mod(^rn  and  well-e(ini])i»ed  saw  and  grist  mills; 
a  good  newspaper;  well-ai»pointed  drug  stores  and  prac- 
tical druggists;  model  and  thorough  public  schools  and 
the  Sanpete  Stake  Academy;  and  is  one  of  the  most  moral 
and  law-observing  cities  of  central  Utah. 

The  commercial  interests  of  Ephraim  have  always 
been  conservative  and  carefully  guarded  by  thoughtful 
and  responsible  linanciers.  The  co-operative  system  wai» 
inaugurated  in  early  days  and  has  been  generally  ob- 
served. Irrigation  being  the  basis  of  prosperity  has 
commanded  universal  attention  and  the  water  has  been 
generously  yet  econonucall}'  managed  and  equally  dis- 
tributed. The  Cottonwood  Canal  and  Tunnel  Company, 
incorporated  November  9,  1894,  with  a.  capital  stock  of 
145,000,  and  the  Sand  I\idge  Reservoir  and  Canal  Com- 
pany, incori^orated  December  22,  1897,  with  a  capital 
stock  of  120,000,  with  numerous  individual  and  co-oper- 
ative faiTQi  ditches,  supply  sufficient  water  for.  irrigating 
the  surrounding  fields  that  yield  immense  crops  of  cereals 
for  which  the  county  is  noted  throughout  the  West. 
Water-masters  are  employed  and  the  water  is  distributed 
at  a  nominal  expense  to  each  individual  irrigator. 

The  shipment  of  grain,  wool  and  farm  products  has 


I 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  285 

become  quite  au  extensive  business  iu  Epbraim  and  many 
thousands  of  doHars  are  received  annually  by  citizens  in 
payment  for  articles  exported  to  foreign  markets. 
Among-  the  firms  interested  in  handling  ^jroduce  none 
are  more  successfu.1,  nor  have  been  of  greater  service  to 
the  people  than  C.  Andi'ews  &  Co.  of  Xephi.  A  branch 
house  has  been  maintained  in  Ephraim  by  Peter  Greaves, 
Sr.,  president  of  the  company,  who  has  shipped  many 
trainloads  of  grain  and  other  marketable  produce  and 
furnished  a  home  demand  for  the  farmers'  sui'jjlus.  John 
Otterstrom  is  also  a  heavy  shipper  in  grain,  butter,  eggs, 
etc.  Previous  to  the  building  of  railroads  many  local 
teams  were  employed  in  freighting  j)roduce  to  the  mining 
cami)S  and  other  markets,  and  iu  this  manner  some  of 
the  best  citizens  accumulated  sufficient  means  to  pur- 
chase farms. 

In  1890  the  Rio  Grande  Western  railroad  was  com- 
l»]eted  to  Ephraim,  and  the  event  celebrated  by  a  grand 
banquet  given  the  officials.  This  opened  up  the  hither- 
to hidden  avenues  of  commerce  with  the  outside 
world  and  stimulated  all  kinds  of  financial  enterprises. 
The  farmers  ^^und  a  better  cash  market  for  their  grain 
and  produce  and  i-anchmen  were  enabled  to  ship  their 
sheep  and  cattle  to  the  large  Eastern  markets.  Since 
then  there  has  been  a  constant  fiow  of  money  to  the 
residents  of  this  city,  in  payment  for  products  shipp>ed 
and  general  prosperity  prevails  everywhere.  The  rail- 
road comi)any  erected  a  commodious  depot  and  has  al- 
ways kept  obliging  agents  and  furnished  first-class  pas- 
senger and  freight  service. 

The  Sanpete  Valley  railroad  was  added  to  the  re- 
sources of  Ephraim  in  1S93,  and  thereby  connected  this 
city  with  the  markets  not  reached  by  the  Rio  Grande 
Western.  A  good  depot  was  erected  near  the  business 
stieet  and  within  a  few  rods  of  the  other  railroad  office, 
and  Ephraim  at  once  sprang  into  prominence  as  the 
Junction  City.  Many  citizens  were  employed  in  con- 
structing this  road,  under  the  management  of  Heniw 
Beal,  and  some  are  still  engaged  in  keeping  the  roadbed 
in  repair.  Regular  trains  pass  through  Ephraim  daily 
•over  both  roads,  insuring  the  verv  best  accommodal  ions 


286  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

for  business  iiieii  and  commercial  travelers.  The  revenue 
derived  from  taxation  of  these  corporations  assists  very 
materially  in  paying  the  expenses  of  the  municipality, 
hence  taxes  are  lower  here  than  elsewhere  in  the  county, 

A  flouring  mill  was  built  in  the  canyon  east  of 
the  city  in  the  early  days,  by  Manti  parties,  and  has  later 
been  changed  to  modern  process,  with  all  the  improved 
facilities  for  making  flour.  The  Climax  Mills  are  noted 
far  and  near  for  superior  products  of  breadstuft's,  and 
shipments  are  made  to  all  the  principal  local  markets. 
The  excellent  hard  wlieat  grown  by  irrigation  finds  a 
market  in  the  leading  Western  cities  and  the  value  of 
Ephraim  'as  a  bread  and  grain  producer  is  known  at  home 
and  abroad.  The  mill  is  owned  and  operated  by  home 
people,  interested  in  the  development  of  home  enterprises 
and  is  an  index  of  the  business  abilities  of  the  citizens. 
An  electric  light  and  power  plant  may  some  day  be 
added  to  this,  and  its  usefulness  increased. 

The  Epliraim  Equitable  Creamery  was  built  in  the 
summer  of  1S!).~)  by  a  stock  company.  Officers  were 
Christian  AVillardse-n,  president;  D.  W,  Anderson,  vice- 
president;  (ieorge  Lai'sen,  secretary;  S.  P.  Peterson, 
treasurer,  with  P.  K.  Olsen,  Ephraim  Peterson  and  C.  P. 
Neilson  conii>letiiig  the  directory.  The  stock  is  now 
o^^'ned  principally  by  Ceorge  Larsen,  Ephraim  Peterson 
and  C.  P.  Xeilson,  who  conduct  the  business.  They  man- 
ufacture  butter  and  chieese  of  siiperior  quality  and  pay 
good  prices  for  milk,  thus  creating  a  home  cash  market 
for  the  farmers'  product.  The  creameiw  is  well  located 
and  with  the  b<^st  possible  shipping  facilities,  gives  as- 
surance of  becoming  a.  permanent  and  successful  financial 
addition  to  the  Junction  City. 

In  1892  Oluf  Neilson  attempted  to  establish  a  home 
foundry  for  castjuo-  i^  -^  '^nd  brass,  but  gave  up  the  enter- 
prise because  of  the  thought  that  work  would  be  insuf- 
ficient to  justifs'  the  outlay  for  necessary  machinery.  In 
1898  he  returned  to  this  city  and  in  company  with  Paul 
B,  Alder  of  Manti  put  in  a  first-class  plant.  They  are 
fully  equipped  with  all  kinds  of  machinery  and  prepared 
to  do  casting  in  iron  and  brass  for  repairing  farm  imple- 
uK^nts,  stoves  and  other  necessities  in  their  line. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  287 

Ephraim  is  strictly  an  agTieultiiral  commuuity, 
though  many  of  the  prominent  citizens  are  engaged  in 
stock-raising-  and  wool-growing  in  addition  to  cultiyating 
their  fanns  and  orchards.  But  little  interest  has  eyer 
deyeloped  in  mining  prospects,  though  some  excellent 
showings  of  good  coal  r-  "^'mnd  in  the  canyon  to  the  east, 
and  good  assays  of  siher  haye  been  obtained  from  the 
western  mountains.  Fruit-growing  has  recently  receiyed 
a  stimulus  and  the  acreage  planted  to  orchards  inci'eases 
eyery  year.  Numerous  tests  of  soil  and  sugar  beets 
grown  here  dem^^^  '  that  conditions  are  fayorable 

for  successful  beet  culture,  while  all  the  natural  facilities 
are  present  for  a  sugar  factor^  tannery,  woolen  mills, 
breweries,  starch  factories  iind  many  other  similar  plants 
for  consuming  the  raw  niiiterials. 

In  June,  1890,  the  fii'st  issue  of  the  County  Kegister 
was  published  in  Ephraim,  under  the  management  of 
James  T.  Jakeman.  This  was  the  second  pai>er  printed 
in  the  county  and  was  deyoted  to  the  interests  of  the 
people,  being  independent  in  politics  and  religion.  J^ater 
the  plant  was  purchased  by  M.  F.  Murray  &  Co.,  and  the 
name  of  the  newspaper  changed  to  the  Enterprise.  This 
\yeekly  publication  is  now  issued  by  the  company,  with 
M.  F.  Murray  as  editor,  and  is  a  creditable  paper,  desery- 
ing  of  patranoge  by  the  citizens  of  the  county.  It  is 
Democratic  in  politics  and  an  able  defender  of  the  rights 
of  the  people  and  an  exponent  of  the  many  resources  and 
possibilities  in  the  tiucUicial  deyelopment  of  this  citj-. 

All  the  pioneers  of  Ephraim  were  members  of  the 
Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of  Latter-day  Saints,  and  the 
church  organization  was  considered  one  of  the  important 
factors  in  colonization.  Eeuben  W.  AUred  was  the  first 
bishop.  His  place  Ayas  filled  by  Bishops  Chase,  Kofford 
and  Caleb  Edwards.  In  1867  Canute  Peterson  was  called 
as  bishop  and  in  July,  1877,  was  appointed  president  of 
the  stake.  The  present  church  organization  consists  of 
two  wards,  with  L.  S.  Anderson  and  C.  E.  Dorius  bishops. 
An  elegant  and  commodious  tabernacle  adorns  the  center 
of  this  city  and  regular  meetings  are  held  eyery  Sunday 
afternoon.  This  building  was  erected  by  indiyidual  do- 
nations, the  material  being  natiye  stone  obtained  near 


288  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

the  citv.     Sunday-schools  and  other  church  societies  are 
lield  regularly  and  are  in  flourishing  condition. 

In  the  spring  of  1875  Eev.  D.  J.  McMillan  held  ser- 
vices in  the  South  ward  schoolhouse,  under  the  auspices 
of  the  Presbyterian  church.  A  mission  school  was  opened 
two  years  later  by  J.  S.  M(  ^Millan  and  a  Sunday-school 
organized.  Miss  M.  Fishback  soon  took  charge  of  the 
schools  and  continued  the  work  till  1879.  Her  school  was 
kept  in  an  earth-covered  house  belonging  to  George 
(>uinn.  The  i)roi)erty  was  aftei'W'ard  purchased  by  Miss 
S.  Carrie  Kea  and  donated  to  the  Presb^^terian  church. 

In  tlie  fall  of  '77  meetings  were  held  in  the  hall 
owned  by  O.  A.  Larsen,  Kev.  F.  Franson  and  M.  Freder- 
ickson  being  the  preachers.  An  interest  wa«  developed 
and  several  members  were  added  to  the  church.  On  Feb- 
luary  1,  1880,  Pevs.  D.  J.  McMillan  and  F.  Franson  or- 
ganized the  church  with  four  members,  and  Pev.  G.  W. 
Martin  was  soon  after  put  in  charge  as  pastor.  The  build- 
ing is  a  neat  stone  structure  25x40  feet,  substantially 
built  and  well  furnished  at  a  cost  of  about  |2100,  most 
of  which  was  furnished  bv  the  board  of  missions.  It  was 
formally  dedicated  August  20,  1882,  Rev.  G.  W.  Leonard 
preaching  the  dedicatory'  sermon  before  the  Presbytery 
then  in  session.  Regular  services  are  held  by  Rev.  G. 
\\.  ^Martin,  tlie  efficient  pastor.  The  membership  now 
numbers  twenty-six,  and  the  school  is  well  patronized. 

In  September,  1880,  Miss  Rea  took  charge  of  the 
school  and  remained  the  teacher  for  ten  years,  giving 
good  satisfaction  and  succeeding  in  building  up  a  fine 
school.  The  teachers  since  employed  were  Misses  Brown, 
Helen  N.  Cough,  Fannie  Galbraith,  L.  B.  Work  and  A. 
B.  Fitts,  now  in  charge.  The  enrollment  has  ranged  from 
tliiriy-six  to  sixty  pupils  and  the  school  has  always  been 
of  the  highest  order. 

The  first  attempt  at  organizing  a  Methodist  church  in 
Ephraim  was  made  in  1883  by  Hans  Hammer,  a  lay 
preacher,  and  in  1885  the  present  church  edifice  was 
erected,  being  the  first  Methodist  building  constructed 
iii  Sanpete  county.  The  work  was  chiefly  among  Scan- 
dinavians and  is  continued  so  under  the  present  able  pas- 
tor, Eev.  Johan  M.  Hansen.     Among  the  ministers  who 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  289 

have  assisted  in  this  mission  are:  Lars  Olsen,  N.  L.  Han- 
sen, O.  O.  Twede,  P.  M.  Ellefsen  and  P.  E.  Petersen.  The 
teachers  have  been  Misses  Emma  Thorsen,  Julia  Iverson 
and  Lydia  Arveson.  Methodism  has  made  good  progress 
and  numbers  some  prominent  citizens  of  Sanpete  among 
its  membership.  The  schools  are  always  well  conducted 
and  the  services  marJced  by  earnestness  and  desire  to  bet- 
ter humanity. 

Ephraim  is  not  a  lodge  city,  though  many  of  her 
representative  residents  ai-e  members  of  different  secret 
societies  and  beneficial  orders  in  other  cities.  Court  Eph- 
raim Xo.  8544,  Ancient  Order  of  Foresters  of  America, 
was  organized  in  this  city  March  23,  1895,  with  twenty 
members.  A  hall  Avas  fitted  up  and  regular  meetings 
held  for  some  time,  Avhen  the  charter  was  sun'endered 
aud  the  court,  disbanded.  The  first  officers  were:  A.  J. 
Young,  chief  ranger;  N.  J.  Madsen,  sub  chief  ranger;  .M. 
F.  Murray,  past  chief  ranger;  Lawrence  Kasmussen,  sen- 
ior woodman;  Ephraim  Clawson,  junior  woodman;  H.  O. 
Connell,  senior  beadle;  Albert  Greaves,  junior  beadle; 
M.  F.  Murray,  secretary;  H.  P.  Larsen,*  treasurer  and 
druggist;  Dr.  H.  V.  Cassiday,  physician. 

Ephraim  has  probably  furnished  more  pioneers  m 
c-olonizing  new  places  than  any  settlement  in  Sanpete 
county.  The  first  settlers  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  in  1859, 
were  citizens  of  Ephraim;  the  missionaries  to  Piute  coun- 
ty for  settling  Circle  Valley  were  from  Ephraim;  the 
pioneei's  of  Mayfield  were  chiefly  raised  in  this  city,  and 
many  of  the  colonists  of  Castle  Valley  in  Emery  county 
were  sons  and  daughters  of  the  people  of  Ephraim.  In 
addition  to  the  colonists  of  other  later  settlements  in 
Sanpete  coming  largely  from  this  place,  scores  of  mis- 
sionaries have  traveled  in  all  parts  of  the  world,  and  a 
good  share  of  the  county  and  State  officials  have  been 
residents  of  this  city.  Hons.  Henry  Beal  and  Canute 
Peterson  represented  the  people  in  the  Territorial  Legis- 
lature of  1882.  Hon.  A.  C.  Lund  represented  this  city 
in  the  Constutional  Convention  and  Hon.  Peter  Thomp- 
son served  as  a  member  of  the  first  State  Legislature. 
Hons.  Peter  Greaves,  Sr.,  Peter  Greaves,  Jr.,  C.  W.  Peter- 
son, A.  H.  Lund  and  others  have  served  in  different  posi- 
tions of  honor  in  county  and  State. 


290  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

The  people  of  Ephraiin  have  always  been  a  quiet, 
peace  loving  community,  and  but  few  cases  of  criminal 
characters  have  originated  in  the  city.  But,  when  the 
residents  of  Sani)ete  county  needed  assistance  to  protect 
their  lives  and  property  against  Indian  invasions,  the 
<-itizens  of  Ephraim  responded  to  the  call  for  volunteers 
and  minute  men,  and  continued  the  fight  until  peace  was 
declared  and  property  safe  from  devastation.  The  same 
.spirit  entered  the  youths  and  prompted  several  to  offer 
their  services  to  the  United  States  when  war  was  de- 
clared against  Spain,  and  the  independence  of  Cuba 
promised.  Those  who  left  home  and  friends  for  patriotic 
love  of  country  and  humanity  were:  Wan*en  Larsen, 
James  W.  All  red,  Frank  Anderson,  Parley  Christensen, 
I.ouis  Anderson,  Oscar  Breinholt,  Henry  Olsen,  Thor- 
Avald  Christensen  and  Dr.  H.  W.  Young. 

In  ediicMf idual  matters  this  city  ranks  among  the 
more  promiui'iit  settlements  of  Sanpete  county  and  cen- 
tral rtah.  Public  schools  liave  been  maintained  ever 
since  the  llrst  year  the  town  was  settled,  and  the  best  and 
most  experien^'ed  teachers  have  been  employed.  The 
Sanpete  Stake  Academy  began  in  Society  hall  November 
5,  1888,  as  a  higher  institution  of  learning,  under  the  di- 
rection of  Alma  Greenwood  as  principal.  This  institu- 
tion has  flourished  beyond  the  fondest  expectations  and 
its  students  come  from  all  settlements  of  southern  Utah. 
The  studies  include  rhetoric,  physiology,  algebra, 
geology,  Spanish,  penmanship,  typewriting,  stenography, 
commercial  arithmetic,  connnercial  law,  book-keeping, 
music,  carpentry  and  blacksmithing. 

The  enrollment  for  1807  numbered  198  pupils  and 
there  were  fifteen  graduates.  The  faculty  comprises 
some  of  the  best  educators  in  the  State,  the  personnel  of 
A\  Inch  is  as  follows:  Xewton  E.  Xoyes,  principal  and  in- 
structar  in  theology,  rhetoric,  pedagogy  and  physics; 
George  Christensen,  instructor  in  theology,  general  his- 
tory, algebra  and  methods  of  teaching;  Parley  Nielsen, 
registrar  and  instructor  in  theology,  grammar,  arithmetic 
and  geography;  Thomas  A.  Beal,  instructor  in  phono- 
graphy, typewriting,  commercial  arithmetic  and  penman- 
ship; Carrie  Peterson,  instructor  in  music;  Charles  Jen- 


I 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  291 

sen,  M.  D.,  instructor  in  physiology  and  hygiene;  Eph- 
raim  Hansen,  LL.  B.,  instructor  in  commercial  law;  En- 
dreas  Olsen,  instructor  in  mechanical  drawing  and  car- 
pentry; Alfred  Doll,  instructor  in  blacksmithing;  Maud 
Bliss,  instructor  in  dressmaking.  The  Academy  is  under 
the  following  stake  Board  of  Education:  Canute  Peter- 
son, president;  Henry  Beal,  treasurer;  John  B.  Maiben, 
William  T.  Reid,  Christian  A.  Madsen,  John  W.  Irons, 
James  A.  Allred,  Christian  N.  Lund,  Lewds  Swensen. 
The  executive  committee  consists  of  the  folloAving:  Ca- 
nute Peterson,  fj resident;  Heniy  Beal,  John  B.  Maiben, 
Annie  Peterson  Frost,  secretary. 


PUBLIC  SCHOOLS. 

The  present  efficient  school  board  consists  of  well- 
known  and  representative  citizens,  who  are  deeply  inter- 
ested in  educational  affairs:  J.  P.  Hansen,  Jr.,  president; 
Peter  Thompson,  clerk,  and  J.  P.  Jensen,  treasurer.  The 
school  teachers  for  1898  are  under  the  able  guardianship 
of  I'rof.  A.  AA'.  Jensen  as  principal  and  are  as  follows: 
Ileber  Nielson,  D.  W.  Thompson,  Ea}^  Lund,  Christian 
Larsen,  Misses  Callie  Thorpe,  Julia  Dorius,  Matilda  Ras- 
mussen  and  Ida  Peterson.  According  to  the  last  report 
of  the  trustees,  dated  June  30,  1898,  the  school  popula- 
tion consists  of  719  pupils  and  74  per  cent  were  enrolled 
in  the  public  schools  during  the  school  year.  The  aver- 
age pay  of  teachei's  is  |55  per  month  for  males  and  |35 
for  females.  School  grounds,  fumiture  and  apparatus 
were  valued  at  |2392.25. 

The  Ephraim  opera-house  is  without  doubt  the  finest 
and  neatest  arranged  amusement  building  south  of  Salt 
Lake  City.  It  was  begun  about  1896  by  a  company  of 
citizens  and  afterward  assigned  to  Andrew^  Thorpe  and 
Ezra  ]Madsen,  who  completed  and  equipped  the  building. 
It  is  seventy-six  and  one-half  feet  in  length  and  fifty  feet 
in  width,  centrally  located  and  an  ornament  to  the  city. 
The  fact  that  such  a  building  could  be  erected  and  kept 
in  order  is  proof  positive  that  this  city  surpasses  all 
others  as  an  amusement  place.     The  owners  have  a  fran- 


292  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

cliise  for  lij>liting  the  oit}'  from  an  electi'ic  plant  which  is 
soon  to  be  operated  in  connection  with  the  opera-house, 

Ephraim  has  practically  the  same  political  history 
as  other  settlements  in  the  county.  The  People's  party 
was  almost  unanimous  until  the  division  on  national 
party  lines,  when  the  tAvo  leavino-  par-ties  were  about 
equally  represented.     The  present  city  officials  are: 

Mayor,  J.  P.  Hansen,  Jr.;  Councillors,  Peter 
Schwalbe,  Christian  Frandsen,  William  J.  Armstrong,  C. 
R.  Dorius,  A.  W.  Jensen;  Eecorder,  Adolph  Hansen;  Mar- 
shal, David  N.  Beal;  Tr'easrrrer,  Laura  Hansen;  Justice 
of  the  Peace,  J.  P.  Anderson;  Pound-keeper,  Eas,  Han- 
sen; Street  Hui>ers'isor,  Thomas  P.  Peterson;  Sexton,  John 
C.  Johnson. 


PETER  JOHANSEN, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


JENS  GUNDERSEN, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


HANS    J.    SIMPSON, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


PROMINENT  CITIZENS  OF  EPHRAIM. 


n  LLEED,  GEOEGE,  farmer,  son  of  Martin  C.  and  Mary 
r\  neskitt,  was  born  in  Caldwell  county,  Mo.,  Sept. 
/  27,  1837.  Parents  died  when  he  was  two  years  old, 
and  his  grandfather  raised  him.  They  came  to  Utah  in 
'51,  crossing  the  plains  in  ox  train  under  Isaac  Allred, 
and  located  in  Manti.  In  March,  1852,  they  removed  to 
Spring  City,  but  were  soon  driven  out  by  Indians,  return- 
ing to  Manti,  and  in  '54  came  to  Ephriam.  The  family 
consisted  of  George,  his  grand  parents,  James  and  Eliza- 
beth, and  his  sister  Eliza  E.  Edwards,  widow  of  William, 
who  died  on  the  way  across  the  plains.  They  assisted  in 
constructing  the  fort.  In  '65  he,  with  others,  went  to 
Circle  Valley,  remaining  t^'o  years,  when  they  were 
driven  out  by  Indians.  He  took  part  in  both  Indian  wars, 
being  in  several  engagements  in  Spring  City  in  '53  and 
Kabbit  valleA^  in  '67.  He  has  a  nice  fann  of  forty  acres, 
well  stocked  and  a  comfortable  residence  in  the  city. 
In  '95  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council.  His 
wife  was  Maria,  daughter  of  Neils  and  Helena  Sorenson, 
born  in  Denmark,  January  7,  1843.  They  were  married 
in  Ephraim  Fort,  March  16,  1857.  She  died  in  this  city 
April  1(5,  1892.  They  had  ten  children:  Maiy  H.,  James 
W.,  Charles,  Orson  and  Andrew  H.,  living;  Hannah  M., 
George  M.,  Eliza,  E.,  John  F.  and  Parley  P.,  deceased. 

n  NDEESOX,  BISHOI^  LAES  S.,  son  of  Andi^w  Larson 
r\  and  Annie  Kathren  Hansen,  was  born  April  16, 
'  1829.  His  father  was  a  sailor  and  lost  his  life  at  sea 
in  1841.  Mother  was  left  with  five  children  and  Lars  and 
a  brother  supported  them.  He  served  as  a  sailor  in  a  two- 
years'  war  and  received  a  diploma  for  faithful  seiwices. 
Februari^  8,  1852,  he  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  May 


294  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

lOtli  of  tke  same  year  was  niniiii^d  to  A-niiic  Sophia, 
daughter  of  Lars  Jensen  and  Annie  Marie  Larscn.  They 
left  their  native  land  for  Utah  NovembiM*  L*T,  lc>r»5,  and 
after  a  voyage  of  eleven  weeks  and  three  days  reached 
the  United  States,  after  losing'  their  infant  cliikl.  In 
the  spring  of  1856  they  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox-train 
under  Capt.  Canute  reterson,  and  located  :.t  Ephraim. 
Ee  took  part  in  the  Johnson  and  lilack  Hawk  w.iis  and 
was  active  in  guarding  the  i>eople.  Was  appointed  head 
te.u-her  in  1858,  and  in  18G7  was  .ii)])oii]lod  first  rounsel- 
ler  to  Bishop  Canute  l*etei«on.  Served  as  City  Coun- 
cilor eight  years,  and  a  dirc'tor  in  the  Co-op.  stnre  eight 
jiears.  In  1873  he  was  calleil  on  a  mission  and  presided 
over  tlie  Christiania  confereiuc.  In  1875  he  returned 
to  Utah  as  president  of  a  com]iany  of  175  Saints;  ar- 
rived in  Ephraim  July  21th  wiih  sivlecii  A\agons  loaded 
aHIi  emigTauts.  Was  app'<)iuted  bishop  ol  Kj)hraim, 
north  ward,  in  1870  and  continues  to  hold  that  position 
with  perfect  satisfaction  to  the  people.  In  1887  he  per- 
formed a  second  mission  to  Scandinavia,  where  he  pre- 
'sided  over  the  Aarhus  conference.  On  his  return  he  was 
leader  of  the  company  of  347  emigrants.  He  is  engaged 
in  farming  and  stock-raising,  besides  being  bishop  and 
tithing  clerk.  His  family  consists  of  twenty-one  children, 
eleven  being  alive  and  the  others  deceased. 


Anderson,  Andrew,  farmer,  son  of  Andrew  and 
ri  Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark,  November  4,  1836.  He 
'  joined  the  Momion  church,  and  in  '56  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  independent  ox  train.  They 
endured  many  hardships,  suffering  from  cold  and  hun- 
ger, and  were  brought  to  Salt  Lake  City  by  a  relief  com- 
pany, December  16,  1856.  In  '57  he  came  to  Ephraim 
and  engaged  in  fanning.  He  purchased  a  small  tract  and 
now  has  fifty  acres  and  a  home  in  the  city.  In  '62  he 
went  to  Omaha  for  emigrants,  and  in  '65  removed  to  Cir- 
cle Valley  to  assist  in  settling  the  country.  Built  a  home, 
but  had  to  leave  because  of  Indians.  He  took  part  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war,  being  a  minute  man.  In  '83  he  went 
to  Denmark  on  a  tw^o  years'  mission.    Is  one  of  the  pres- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  295 

idf  nts  of  the  Forty-seventh  quorum  of  Seventies.  Was 
married  in  Ephraim^  December  21,  1859,  to  Kersten, 
daughter  of  Rasmus  and  Ingabor  Olsen,  born  in  Den- 
mark, February  27,  1814.  Her  par-ents  came  to  Ephraim 
in  '51,  where  they  both  died.  Her  children  are:  Christina, 
Hannah  S.  and  Rosetta. 

A  NDERSON,  ANDREW  L.,  farmer,  son  of  Lars  A.  and 
M  Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark,  Jan.  22, 1850.  The  fam- 
/  ily  joined  the  Mormon  church,  and  came  to  Utah, 
crossing'  the  plains  in  Canute  Peterson's  company,  and 
located  in  Ephraim  in  October,  1856.  They  lived  in  the 
fort  several  years;  father  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  and  died  here  Januaiy  26,  1882.  Mother  died  here 
also.  Andrew  was  raised  here,  father  giving  him  ten 
acres  of  land.  He  freighted  produce  to  the  mining 
camps  and  added  to  his  land,  till  he  now  has  forty-five 
acres.  Went  on  a  mission  to  Denmark  in  '81,  and  for 
eighteen  months  had  charge  of  Randei^s  branch.  Was 
married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  31,  1870,  to  Johanna 
C,  daughter  of  Thomas  C.  and  Caroline  Jensen,  born  in 
Denmark,  August  4,  1853.  They  have  had  nine  children, 
Johanna,  James,  Lydia,  Archie  and  Omra,  living;  An- 
drew, Albei't,  Thomas  and  Elizabeth,  deceased. 

f\  NDERSON,  JENS,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of  An- 
M  dreas  and  Ellon,  was  born  in  Sweden  April  29, 
/  1833.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon 
chnrch  in  '53  and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in 
an  independent  train  under  Capt.  Olsen,  and  arrived  in 
Ephraim  in  October,  1854.  Assisted  in  building  the  fort, 
and  received  five  aci'es  of  land  and  a  lot  in  the  city. 
Tlie  following  year  the  grasshoppers  took  his  crops  and 
they  had  a  hard  time.  In  '66  he  went  to  the  Missouri 
river  for  emigrants.  Was  active  during  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  and  was  called  to  assist  in  settling  Circle  Valley. 
He  built  a  home  and  raised  a  crop,  but  was  driven  out 
by  Indians,  losing  all  he  had.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
(^ity  Council  five  years.  In  '77  he  returned  to  Sweden 
and  Denmark  on  a  two  years'  mission.  He  has  been 
head  ward  teacher  and  president  of  the  Seventies  quo- 


296  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

rum  for  several  years.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  Decem- 
ber, 1854,  to  Lana  Anderson.  She  has  had  eight  children, 
James  P.,  Maria  C,  Ellen,  Andrew,  Lauretta  and  George, 
living;  Malinda  and  Lena,  deceased.  Second  wife  was 
Christina  Berlin.  She  has  had  three  children,  Nora  and 
Annie,  living;  Sarah,  deceased. 

n  NDEIISON,  JENS  P.,  son  of  Andrew  and  Catherine, 
r\  was  born  in  Denmark,  January  4,  182G.  He  learned 
/  the  trade  of  a  miller  and  served  ninteeu  months  in 
the  army.  Joined  the  Mormon  church  November  5,  1852, 
and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train 
under  Capt.  Olsen,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October 
5,  1854.  While  working  thei-e  on  a  canal  the  bank  caved 
on  him  and  he  had  to  walk  on  cnitches  for  two  years. 
In  '56  he  came  to  Ephraim  and  assisted  in  building  the 
fort.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  In  '62  he  re- 
moved to  Glenwood,  among  the  first  settlers,  built  a 
home,  but  was  driven  out  by  Indians,  losing  everything, 
lie  returned  to  Ephraim  in  '66  and  engaged  in  farming, 
following  it  at  present.  His  first  wife,  married  in  Den- 
mark, was  Maiw  Jacobseu.  She  died  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
February  9,  1855,  their  only  child,  a  daughter,  dying 
•while  crossing  the  ocean.  Second  wife  was  Rebecca  C. 
Frieze.  She  liad  tliree  cliildren,  Jens  P.,  Maiw  and  Joseph 
E.,  and  died  November  24,  1866.  Third  wife  was  Maria, 
daughter  of  Thomas  C.  and  Karen  M.  Jensen;  married 
December  6,  1866;  born  in  Denmark,  Januaiw  12,  1842. 
She  has  six  children,  Jens  P.,  Erastus,  John  F.,  Nora, 
Marinda  and  Lena.  Also  has  three  childen  by  a  former 
husband,  Peter  Peterson.  They  are  Kiretena,  Mena  and 
Joseph  C. 

n  NDERSON,  JOHN  A.,  fanner,  son  of  John  and  Mar- 
r\  tha,  was  born  in  Malmo,  Sweden,  December  18, 
'  1844.  He  and  liis  parents  came  to  I^tali  in  '63,  cross^ 
ing  tlie  plains  in  Capt.  Saunder's  company,  reaching 
Ephraim  in  October.  In  '63  they  were  called  to  Circle 
Valley  to  assist  the  settlers,  but  had  to  return  in  '66  on 
account  of  Indians.  John  was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
worked  at  railroading  and  other  occupations.    Took  part 


HISTOliY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  297 

in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  and  in  '66  went  back  to  tke 
Missouri  river  after  emigrants.  In  '75  he  went  on  a  two 
years'  mission  to  Sweden.  Was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  in  '74-75,  City  Eecorder  in  '78  to  '82,  and  City 
Assessor  and  Collector  six  years.  In  '88  he  became  man- 
ager of  the  Ephraim  Co-op  store,  which  position  he  held 
for  over  six  years.  Was  a  member  of  the  Quorum  of 
Seventies  several  years.  Is  now  engaged  in  fanning-, 
having  eighty  acres  of  land.  Was  maiTied  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  September  20,  1869,  to  Maria  Neilson.  She  died 
December  29,  1891,  leaving  nine  children,  John  A.,  Em- 
ma, Anna,  lilly,  Alvin,  Huldah,  Nora  and  Arthur,  living; 
Ernest,  deceased.  Married  again  to  Christina  Michael- 
sen.     She  had  two  children,  Maria  and  Annie. 

n  NDEESON,  NEILS,  farmer,  son  of  Andrew  P.  and 
fi  Ellen  was  born  in  Sweden,  November  26,  1835.  He 
'  joined  the  Monnon  church  at  the  age  of  18,  and 
emigrated  in  '55,  going  from  St.  Louis  to  Iowa  on  a  mis- 
sion, then  presided  over  the  branch  at  Weston,  Mo.  Came 
to  Utah  in  '57,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Cowley's  com- 
pany, located  at  Ephraim  and  built  a  house  inside  the 
fort.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  w^ar.  In  '64 
he  Avas  called  to  Circle  A'alley  to  assist  the  settlers.  He 
built  a  home  and  had  a  farm,  but  was  compelled  to  leave 
e^  eiything  on  account  of  Indians.  Returned  to  Ephraim, 
took  up  a  small  farm  and  has  since  engaged  in  farming. 
Has  been  a  member  of  the  High  Council  since  the  stake 
was  organized.  In  '73  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to 
Sweden,  presiding  over  the  Scane  conference.  His  first 
wife,  married  in  Ephraim,  was  Ingaborg  Paulsen.  She 
had  four  sons,  Neils  W.,  Andrew^  C,  James  P.  and  Syd- 
ney R.  Second  wife  was  Anna  O.  Jensen.  She  had  seven 
children:  John  A.,  Ellen,  Joseph  A.,  Louis  H.,  Orson  A., 
Francis  R.  and  Mary  A.  Third  wife  was  Maria  P.  Peter- 
son. She  has  six  children,  Emma  M.,  George  A.,  Daniel 
M.,  Arthur  H.,  Wilford  E.  and  Esther  R. 

Q  NDERSON,  N.  O.,  farmer,  son  of  Ole  and  Annie,  was 
r\  born  in  Skurop,  Sweden,  September  20,  1845.  The 
'  family  joined  the  Mormon  church,  and  in  '55  came 
to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt. 


298  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Hogan,  and  located  in  Ephraim  Helped  to  build  the 
outside  fort  and  lived  inside  it.  Father  died  in  the  fall 
after  arriving  and  was  the  second  person  buried  in  the 
Ephraim  cemeteiy.  Mother  married  Tore}'  Thurston,  and 
N.  O.  lived  with  them  till  he  was  13,  then  with  Jens 
Anderson  one  year  and  with  Rasmus  Larson  seven  years. 
He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  a  minute 
man,  and  had  several  narrow  escapes.  In  '66  he  went 
to  the  Missouri  river  for  emigrants.  Performed  a  two 
years'  mission  to  Sweden,  leaving  in  1880 .  Was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council  six  years.  Was  married  in  Eph- 
raim on  November  2,  1867,  to  Josephine,  daughter  of 
Andrew  and  Caroline  Overlade.  She  died  November  10, 
1884.  They  had  seven  children,  Neils  O.,  Adelbert, 
-Vnnie,  Frank,  Archie,  Frederick  and  Leroy.  Married 
51  gain  December  18,  1885,  to  Matilda  Nilson.  She  has  one 
child,  Neils  H. 

n  XDERSON,  PETER,  farmer,  son  of  Lai-s  and  Mary, 
rl  was  bom  in  Denmark,  November  16,  1844.  The 
'  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated, 

crossing  tlie  plains  in  Canute  Peterson's  train,  and  lo- 
cated in  Ephraim  in  September,  1856,  where  parents 
died.  Peter  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in 
the  Salina  canyon  and  Circle  Valley  engagements.  In 
'63  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emigrants.  In  '85 
went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Denmark,  during  the 
last  three  months  of  the  time  serving  as  president  over 
Pander's  branch.  He  owns  seventy-five  acres  of  land 
and  residence.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  April  25,  1865, 
to  Elsie  M.,  daughter  of  Lars  and  Karen  Paulsen,  born 
in  Denmark,  October  18,  1847.  They  have  nine  children, 
Peter  C,  Louis,  Hyrum,  Alice  M.,  Caroline  L.,  Mary  S., 
Joseph  P.,  Seymour  G.  and  Ida  E. 

A  NDERSON,  P.  C,  manager  Junction  Co-op  store,  son 
rl  of  Peter  and  Margaret,  was  bom  in  Ephraim,  March 
'  10,  1866.  Attended  the  public  schools  and  took  a 
course  of  one  year  in  the  normal  department  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Utah.  Taught  school  in  Ephraim  seven  years, 
being  principal  of  the  intermediate  department.     Was 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  299 

elected  City  Treasurer  in  '88,  served  two  years,  and  was 
elected  City  Recorder  in  -OT.  Quit  the  schoolroom  in  '90 
on  account  of  ill  health  and  was  appointed  assignee  of 
the  Co-op  store,  which  failed.  The  store  was  purchased 
by  E.  C.  Willardsen,  C.  W.  Peterson  and  Ole  Olson,  and 
in  Januaiy,  1897,  P.  O.  bought  a  one-fourth  interest. 
They  carry  a  stock  of  about  |17,000  and  do  a  business  of 
f40,000  annually,  selling  dry  goods,  groceries  and  arti- 
cles usually  kej)t  in  a  general  store,  besides  buying  and 
shipping  grain  and  produce.  The  firm  does  the  largest 
business  in  buying  grain  of  any  company  in  the  county . 
lie  is  director,  secretaiy  and  treasurer  of  the  Sand  Eidge 
Reservoir  and  Canal  company,  capable  of  irrigating  1000 
acres  of  land.  Is  superintendent  of  the  Ephraim  Sunday- 
school  and  an  earnest  worker.  He  is  a  self-made  man, 
starting  w  ithout  a  cent  and  borrowing  money  from  Chris- 
tian Willardsen  to  attend  school.  Was  married  in  Manti 
temple,  February  13,  1889,  to  Healon  A.,  daughter  of 
Henry  B.  and  Elizabeth  Stevens,  born  in  Shonesborg, 
L'tah,  January  22,  1869.  They  have  two  children,  Peter 
M.  and  Healon  C. 

r\  RMSTRONG,  JAMES,  farmer  and  woolgTOwer,  son 
M  of  William  and  Agnes  S.,  was  bom  in  Carlisle, 
■/  Cumberland  county,  England,  November  24,  1844. 
His  parents  joined  the  Mormon  church  among  the  early 
members  and  came  to  the  United  States  in  '49,  stopping 
at  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  where  his  father  died.  In  '54  the  family 
came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  with  Horace  S.  Eld- 
redge  and  Orson  Pratt.  They  located  in  Ephraim,  April 
5,  1857,  mother  taught  sehool  here  several  years  and  died 
December  12,  1893.  James  was  raised  to  farm  work, 
now  owns  150  acres  and  is  extensively  interested  in  wool- 
growing.  Has  2500  sheep,  and  is  a  successful  and  enter- 
prising citizen.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  in 
guarding,  and  was  in  two  or  three  engagements.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  four  years.  Maiiied  in  Salt 
Lake  City,  August  7,  1871,  to  Annie  C,  daughter  of  A. 
1*.  and  Annie  Olson,  born  in  Denmark,  September  25, 
1852.  They  have  had  twelve  children,  John,  Andrew, 
Sarah,  James    A.,  Nancy    H.,  Effie    O.,  Annie    G.,  Jede- 


300  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

diah  and  James  W.,  living;  Agnes  M.,  Nancy  H.  and 
Horace  A.,  deceased. 

r\  RMSTROXG,  WILLIAM  J.,  farmer,  son  of  William 
K|  and  Agues  S.,  was  bom  in  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  March  24, 
/  1850.  His  father  died  in  St.  Louis,  and  in  '54  his 
mother,  himself  and  brother  James  came  to  Utah,  cross- 
ing the  plains  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  Horace  Eld- 
redge.  Mother  maiTied  again  in  Salt  Lake  City,  tO' 
William  Babbitt,  by  whom  she  had  one  child,  Helen  E., 
who  married  Brigham  Young,  and  has  one  child,  Joseph 
A.  Young.  She  and  child  live  mth  William.  Mother 
died  in  Ephraim,  December  9,  1893.  Stood  guard  and 
herded  stock  during  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Owns  fifty- 
five  acres  of  land  and  cultivates  it  successfully.  Was 
Justice  of  the  Peace  two  years.  In  '97  was  elected  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  on  the  Bepublican  ticket. 
Was  married  in  Ephraim,  Januaiy  22,  1890,  to  Hannah 
Wickman,  who  died  December  16,  1892,  leaving  two  chil- 
dren, Jessie  C.  and  William  W. 

BAILEY,  ALFIIED,  farmer,  son  of  Jajnes  and  Mary  A., 
M'as  born  in  Birmingham,  England,  February  20, 
1839.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  silversmith,  work- 
ing with  his  father,  and  followed  it  till  he  came  to  Utah. 
The  family  joined  the  Monnon  church  and  emigrated  in 
'56,  crossing  the  plains  in  the'  first  hand-cart  company. 
They  were  nine  weeks  in  crossing  under  Capt.  Ellsworth, 
and  endured  many  hardships.  Came  to  Ephraim  and 
lived  in  the  fort,  parents  both  dying  liere.  Alfred  worked 
at  farming  and  later  learned  the  trade  of  a  stonecutter, 
which  he  has  followed  some  years,  cutting  tombstones 
and  other  work.  He  owns  a  farm  of  seventy -two  acres. 
Was  City  Recorder  ten  years,  a  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil several  years  and  City  Treasurer  four  years.  Is  one 
of  the  presidents  of  the  Forty-seventh  quorum  and  has 
been  secretary'  thirty  years.  In  the  fall  of  '81  he  went  on 
a  two  years'  mission.  Was  an  active  man  during  the 
Black  Hawk  war,  and  in  '62  went  back  to  the  Missouri 
river  after  emigrants.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  De- 
cember 18,  1862,  to  Sophia  Warrillo  of  England.     They 


HANS  C.    H.    BECK, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


EDWARD  A.  ERICKSEN, 
MT.  PLEASANT. 


MRS.   EDWARD   A.   ERICKSEN, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


I 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  301 

have  had  ten  children,  Louisa  R,,  Alfred,  William, 
Franklin,  James,  John,  Sarah  and  Ada,  living;  Frederick 
and  CaiTie,  deceased. 

BAWDEN,  WILLIAM,  farmer  and  dealer  in  woolea 
goods,  son  of  Henry  and  Ann  Ireland,  was  born  in 
Devonshire,  England,  August  17,  1844.  The  family 
came  to  the  United  States  in  '51,  stopping  one  year  in 
St.  Louis,  Mo.,  and  in  '52  came  to  Salt  Lake  City,  crossing 
t]ie  i^lains  in  an  ox  train.  Was  raised  in  Salt  Lake, 
where  his  father  was  a  blacksmith,  and  in  'G6  came  south 
with  Heber  Kimball's  company  to  assist  in  the  Indian 
war.  In  '72  he  located  in  Ephraim  and  engaged  in  fann- 
ing and  freighting  to  the  mining  camps.  During  the 
Tjast  thirteen  years  has  been  agent  for  James  Whitehead 
of  Springville,  handling  all  kinds  of  woolen  goods.  He 
owns  and  operates  a  good  farm.  Was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City,  September  14,  1867,  to  Emma  J,,  daughter  of 
Stephen  and  Emma  J.  Williams,  bom  in  Bristol,  Eng- 
land, April  7,  1849.  They  have  had  tliirteen  children, 
Emma  J.,  Sarah  E.,  William  H.,  Thomas  A.,  Levi  S., 
Mary  V.,  Martha  A.  and  Joseph  I.,  living;  Ann  R., 
Stephen  N.,  George  L.,  Hazel  and  Ophelia,  deceased. 

BEAL,  HON.  HENRY,  farmer,  son  of  John  and  Ann 
Deacon,  was  born  in  Onandaga  county,  N.  Y.,  April 
30,  1835.  His  parents  jointed  the  Mormon  church 
in  New  York  and  came  to  Nauvoo,  111.,  and  to  Utah  in  '50. 
They  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox  train,  mother  dying  on 
the  road.  Father  died  December  4,  1896,  aged  96  years 
6  months.  They  reached  Manti  about  November  1,  1850, 
where  Henry  lived  till  '54,  when  he  came  to  Ephraim, 
assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  erected  the  second  house 
in  the  town.  He  received  a  piece  of  land  near  the  town 
and  has  since  been  engaged  chiefly  in  farming.  Was  the 
first  Justice  of  the  Peace  and  the  first  man  to  be  married 
in  Ephraim.  Assisted  in  building  the  Climax  roller  mill 
ar.d  still  retains  an  interest.  Was  one  of  the  incorpor- 
ators of  the  old  Co-op  store,  losing  heavily  when  it  failed. 
Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council  several  years.  County 
Commissioner  many  yearSj  and  was  elected  Mayor  in  '95. 
He  was  one  of  the  contractors  in  building  the  Sanpete 


802  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Valley  railroad  and  graded  eleven  miles  of  the  Eio 
Grande  Western.  Has  always  been  a  prominent  church- 
man, was  high  counsellor  and  bishop's  counsellor  several 
years,  and  is  now  first  counsellor  to  President  Peterson. 
His  first  wife  was  Mary  Thorpe,  married  in  Ephraim, 
July  4,  1854.  Their  children  are  Ann  E.,  John  S.,  George 
A.,  Heni'y  T.,  David  N.,  Mary  J.  and  Rosabel.  Second 
wife  was  Anna  C.  B^-ergo,  married  March  28,  1863 .  Their 
children  are  Mary  A.,  Alice,  Sarah  A.,  Thomas  A.,  Or- 
scn,  Nora,  Owen  and  Bardella.  Third  wife  was  Mary 
A.  Thompson,  married  April  25,  1868.  Their  children 
were  Henry  L.,  Annie  M.,  Maiw  M.,  Ellen  C.  and  Martha 
M.  He  has  thii-teen  children  married.  Forty-eight  grand- 
<ihildren  have  been  bom. 

BEAL,  DAVID  X.,  marshal  and  farmer,  son  of  Henry 
and  Maiw,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  November  15, 1863. 
He  was  raised  here  and  engaged  in  farming.  Owns 
eight}'  acres  of  land.  Was  elected  Constable  in  '94  and 
City  Marshal  in  '95.  Was  married  in  Logan,  October  29, 
1886,  to  Martha,  daught(  r  of  Jens  P.  and  Pendicta  Han- 
sen, born  in  Ephraim,  September  16,  1862.  They  have 
five  children,  David  O.,  Bendetta,  Frances,  Nelson  and 
an  infant. 

BECK,  JENS  N.,  faimer,  son  of  Neils  and  Anna,  was 
born  in  Denmark,  May  6,  1847.  He  was  raised  on 
a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '66  and  came 
to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  with  his  uncle,  Peter  Kjess- 
gaard,  in  an  ox  train  under  Capt.  Eice,  reaching  Ej)hraim 
in  October,  1867.  He  worked  in. the  canyon  two  or  three 
years,  freighted  to  mining  camps  two  years,  then  bought 
a  farm;  now  owns  ninety  acres.  In  '94  he  opened  a  gen- 
eral store,  which  he  conducted  till  '96,  when  he  went  on 
a  mission  for  one  year  to  Denmark.  Was  married  in  Salt 
I-ake  City,  December  2,  1871,  to  Olena  M.,  daughter  of 
Hans  C.  and  Hedevig  Jensen,  born  in  Denmark,  March 
26,  1852.  Her  parents  came  here  in  '63,  father  took  part 
in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and  Avas  in  the  canyon  Avlien  the 
ci'owd  was  attacked  by  Indians  and  two  killed.  Her 
ehildren  ai'e  Anna,  James,  Stena,  Hans  O.,  Neils  H., 
NeA\Tnan,  Daniel  and  Leo,  living;  Wilford,  deceased. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  30'S 

BENTSON,  MAIITIN,  fanner,  son  of  Neils  and  Mette, 
Avas  born  in  Sweden,  December  13,  1846.  The  fam- 
ily joined  tlie  Monnon  cbm'ch  in  '53  and  came  to 
Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Olsen's  company, 
reaching  Ephraim  in  October,  1854.  They  lived  in  the 
small  fort  several  years  and  helped  build  the  large  one. 
Father  was  an  active  church  man,  being  president  of 
the  Seventies  quorum  and  a  High  Priest  when  he  died. 
He  went  out  in  '57  to  meet  Jolmson's  army,  and  in  dis- 
charging his  gun  lost  the  thumb  of  his  left  hand.  Martin 
took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in  the  Grass 
valley  skimiish.  In  '6G  he  went  back  to  the  Missouri' 
river  after  emigrants.  Owns  a  farm  of  forty  acres.  Was 
married  in  Ephraim,  March  7,  1866,  to  Mette  M.,  daugh- 
ter of  Soren  and  Annie  Larsen,  born  in  Denmark,  April 
10,  1846.  They  have  had  eight  children,  Annie,  Andrew, 
Nora.,  Neils,  Minnie,  Lucinda  and  Mattie,  living,  Martin, 
deceased. 

BJERREGAAED,  ANDREW  N.,  farmer  and  stock- 
raiser,  sou  of  Andrew  N.  and  Boletta,  was  born  in 
Denmark,  June  6,  1851.  The  family  joined  the 
Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah,  stopping  a  short  time 
in  Biigham  City  and  Goshen  and  locating  in  Ephraim. 
Parents  removed  to  Missouri  several  years  ago,  Andrew 
remained  liere  and  engaged  in  freighting  produce  to  the 
mining  camps  for  about  twenty  years.  He  purchased  a 
tract  of  land  and  engaged  in  cattle-raising  and  now  has 
a  fine  herd  of  150  Durhams  and  Herefords.  Owns  over 
800  acres  of  land.  Was  married  in  Ephraim  November 
22,  1876,  to  Caroline  M.,  daughter  of  Charles  and  Matilda 
AYliitlock,  born  I'ebruaiT  1,  1858.  They  have  liad  ten 
children:  Nora  M.,  Charles,  Ruth,  Minnie  M.,  Arthur,. 
Jennie,  Ferguson,  Allen  E.  and  Joydell,  living;  and 
Katie,  deceased. 

BREINHOLT,  HANS  L.,  farmer,  son  of  Christian  L. 
and  Annie  S.,  vras  born  in  Denmark  Februaiw  21, 
1850.     The  family  came  to  Ephraim  in  1869.     In 
1872  Hans  joined  the  United  States  army  and  seiwed  five 
3'ears,  chiefly  in  Texas    on    Indian    frontier.     Was    dis- 


304  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

charged  in  1877  and  came  to  Ephraim  where  he  bought  a 
small  faiTn.  Father  died  here  July  19,  1897,  mother  died 
on  the  plains  en  route  to  Utah.  Hans  Avas  married  in 
Ephraim,  Ma}'  30,  1877,  to  Maria,  daughter  of  Frederick 
C  and  Amelia  Sorenson,  born  in  Ef)hraim,  April  11,  1855. 
Her  parents  came  to  Ephraim  in  1854.  Father  was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  several  years  and  died  here 
Septembei'  7,  1891.  Mother  still  living.  Children  are: 
Oscar,  Lydia,  Sophronia  and  Florence  C. 

/QlIiaSTEXSEN,  ANDREW,  farmer  and  wool-grower, 
>^  son  of  Andi-ew  C.  and  Mary  E.,  ^\^HH  born  in  Eph- 
i-aini,  Jauuan-  31,  18(58.  He  Avas  raised  on  a  farm 
and  began  with  wool-growing  on  the  shares.  Purchased 
a  small  fann,  now  has  100  acres  and  1000  sheep  and  many 
on  shares.  Was  maiTied  in  E])hraim  September  12,  1894, 
to  jMaiT,  (laughter  of  Alfr(Ml  and  lOliza  Pehrson,  born  in 
Ephraim  Octcdxr  4,  1873.  They  have  two  children: 
Vera  D,  born  June  14,  1895,  and  an  infant. 

/QIIIJISTKXSEX,  AXDIIEW  C,  fanner,  son  of  Chris- 
^^  tiau  and  Elsie  M.,  was  born  in  Denmark,  August 
31,  1825.  He  learned  the  carpenter's  trade,  joined 
the  ]\rormon  church  and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-tiain  under  P)ish<)j>  l*rest(m,  and  located  at  Eph- 
raim in  Sei)tember,  1803.  Removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  in 
1804,  in  18r>5  went  to  Richfield,  but  was  driven  out  in 
1807  bj-  Indians,  and  returned  to  Ephraim,  losing  all  his 
property.  Took  ])art  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  then  ob- 
tained ten  acrt^s  of  land  and  began  farming.  Later  he 
took  up  1G()  acres  three  and  one-half  miles  west  of  Eph- 
raim, lived  on  it  fourteen  years,  and  in  1891  removed  to 
the  city;  dividing  the  farm  among  his  sons.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Denmark  July  4,  1851,  to  Maiw  C.  Paulsen,  Avho 
died  several  years- ago,  leaving  five  children:  Christian, 
Lars,  Martin,  Lena  and  Andrew.  Married  again  June 
19,  1889,  to  Elsie  C.  Olsen,  a  widow,  daughter  of  Chris- 
tian and  Annie  E.  Peterson,  born  in  Denmark  April  10. 
1853.  They  haA'e  four  living  children:  Catherine  T., 
James  L.,  Violet  J.  and  Calvin  J.  Her  first  husband  was 
James  Olsen,  by  whom  she  had  three  children:  Lehi  C, 
Elizabeth  and  Daniel. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  305 

/QHKISTEX8EX,  ERICK,  brickmason,  plasterer  and 
\^  farmer,  son  of  Rasmus  and  Anna,  Avas  born  in  Den- 
mark May  11,  1839.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  ma- 
son, join(^d  the  ]Moinion  church  in  18(32  and  came  to  Utah 
in  186(),  crossint;  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capt. 
Lowry.  His  Avife,  whom  he  married  in  Denmark  April 
9, 18(U),  dic<l  of  clioh'ra,  while  en  route  to  Utah.  He  came 
to  Mt.  Pleasant  and  followed  his  trade  till  1870,  when  he 
removed  to  Ephraim.  Has  contracted  and  put  up  many 
of  the  large  buildings  of  this  city.  He  owns  a  good  tifty- 
acre  farm  Avhich  he  operates.  In  1894  he  went  on  a  two 
years'  mission  to  Denmark.  AVas  married  the  second 
time  in  "Six.  Pleasant  Xovembcr  24,  1860,  to  Karen  C 
daughter  of  Jens  and  Kersten  Jensen,  born  in  Denmark 
October  15,  1835.  They  have  had  seven  children:  Anna 
M.,  JensenaC,  Amelia  D.,  Erick  P.  and  Saretta  L.,  living; 
Carmelia  K.  and  Caroline,  deceased. 

/QHRISTEX85EX,  JEX^<  1\,  farmer  and  stock-raiser, 
\  son  of  Jens  P.  and  Dorthea  M.,  was  boiu  in  Eph- 
raim January  17,  1862.  His  parents  joined  the 
Mormon  church  in  Denmark  and  emigrated  to  Utah,  lo- 
cating in  Ephraim.  Father  was  a  prominent  man  in 
church  and  political  matters,  being  a.  member  of  the  high 
council  from  its  organization  till  Ids  death,  September  8, 
1891,  was  Mayor  of  Ephraim  for  tifteen  years.  Justice  of 
the  Peace  twenty  years,  the  first  notary  public  and  a 
delegate  to  many  county  and  Territorial  conventions. 
Jens  was  raised  on  a.  farm  and  has  followed  that  and 
stock-raising.  He  has  about  150  acres  of  laud.  Is  a  no- 
tary public  and  Justice  of  the  Peace.  Was  the  first  chair- 
man of  the  Democratic  party  in  Ephraim,  holding  the  po- 
sition four  years  and  taking  a  leading  part  in  politics. 
His  wife  was  Mary  H.,  daughter  of  (leorge  and  Caroline 
M.  Allred,  born  in  Ephraim  January  9,  18(>2.  Thej  were 
married  in  Salt  Lake  City  in  November,  1883,  and  have 
one  child:     Eliza  A.,  born  February  20,  1885. 

/J)HR1STENSEN,  JEXS  P.,  deceased;  son  of  Christian 

\      and  Elsie  H.,   was  born  in  Denmark   February  9, 

1833.     He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon 

church,  and  in  1855  started  for  Utah,  stopping  in  Alton, 


306  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

111.,  and  Dakota  City,  Xeb.,  till  1860,  when  he  crossed 
the  plains  as  captain  of  the  Danish  portion  of  his  com- 
pam^,  reaching  Ephraim  in  October.  Bought  a  farm  and 
engaged  in  fanning,  then  became  agent  for  the  Co-op. 
Wagon  and  Machine  Company,  Avhich  position  he  held 
until  his  death,  September  8,  1891.  Served  as  Justice 
of  the  Peace  and  notary  public  and  was  Mayor  ten  or 
twelve  years.  AVas  an  active  churchman,  being  a  mem- 
ber of  the  high  council.  Was  married  in  Denmark  May 
2, 1854,  to  Dorthea  ]M.,  daughter  of  Mads  C.  and  Margaret 
Madsen,  born  in  Denmark  August  24,  1834.  They  had 
seven  children:  Jens  P.,  Cliristian  M.,  born  in  Ephraim 
Februaiy  1,  1867,  who  acted  as  traveling  salesman  and 
assistant  for  liis  father.  He  is  a  violin  player.  Was 
married  November  5,  1884,  to  Nicolina  D.,  daughter  of 
Neils  P.  and  Petrea  K.  Cliristensen,  ])orn  in  Denmark  Au- 
gust 13,  1864.  They  liave  had  six  children:  Clara,  Al- 
bert and  Cliloe,  living;  ]Mabel  D.,  (irnce  C.  and  Ttobert 
E.,  deceased. 

Lewis  E.,  bom  in  Ephraim  June  14,  1873.  Engaged 
in  different  occupations.  ^Fairied  in  Alanti  January  15, 
1806,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  James  and  Elsie  C.  Olsen, 
born  in  Ephraim  August  18,  1875.  The  four  deceased 
were:     Erastus,  Emma,  Dorthea  M.  and  Clara. 

/QURISTIANSEN,  NIELS  C,  retiiTcl  mason  and  far- 
\^  mer,  son  of  Christian  and  Anna  M.,  was  born  in 
Denmark,  October  4,  1817.  He  learned  the  trade  of 
a  mason,  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Fosgren's  company,  being  the 
first  Scandinavian  companj^,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
S(^ptember  30,  1853.  He  worked  on  the  Salt  Lake  Temple 
until  '60,  when  he  came  to  Ephraim  and  continued  work- 
ing at  his  trade.  Took  part  in  the  Black  HaAvk  war, 
being  Captain  of  the  Silver  Greys,  and  for  years  had 
charge  of  the  commissarj^  department.  Was  a  member 
of  the  City  Council  twenty  years  and  a  school  trustee 
twenty-two  years.  Is  a  member  of  the  High  Council  and 
ccunsellor  to  the  president  of  the  High  Priests,  being 
president  of  the  council  in  Ephraim.  Was  married  in 
Denmark,  to  Catherine  Mortensen.    They  had  five  living 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  307 

children,  Anna  M.,  Cliristian,  Emma,  Hannah  and  Cath- 
erine. Wife  died  in  Ephraim,  Februaiy  26,  1893 .  Second 
wife  was  Dorthea  0.  Dahl  of  Denmark.  She  had  three 
children,  Parley,  bishop  of  Mayfield,  Mary  and  Elizabeth. 

0  HIIISTEXSEN,  WILLARD,  known  as  Willard  Pehr- 
V  sou,  son  of  ()le  and  (hiimell  Christensen,  Avas  born 
in  Christiauia,  Norway,  February  6,  1857.  His  father 
died  in  Nor^A-ay,  and  the  family  emigrated  in  '63,  cross- 
ing the  plains  in  an  ox  train,  and  located  in  Ephraim. 
Willard  was  raised  to  farm  work  and  now  has  a  nice 
farm  of  130  acres.  He  was  a  sewing  machine  dealer  for 
nine  years,  then  engaged  in  th^  stock  business  and  farm- 
ing and  later  opened  a  saloon,  his  present  place.  Was 
married  in  Ephraim,  March  14,  1878,  to  Diantha,  daugh- 
ter of  Jorgou  and  Pauline  Olseu,  born  in  Copenhagen, 
Denmark,  June  18,  1857.  They  have  four  children: 
Blanche,  Myrtle,  Adolphus  and  Kesler,  liying;  Batina, 
deceased. 

D  OBI  US,  BISHOP  CHABLES  B.,  son  of  Carl  C.  N. 
and  Ellen  G.  Bolfson,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  July 
10,  1858.  His  father  was  bishop  of  the  Ephraim 
south  Avard  for  seAcnteen  years.  Was  among  the  early 
settlers,  a  verA^  prominent  man,  and  much  interested  in 
laying  out  land,  building  roads  and  making  ditches.  Was 
a  member  of  tlie  City  Council  for  several  years.  He  died 
March  4,  1894.  Charles  B.  was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
freighted  produce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and 
Nevada.  In  '86  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Nor- 
way. On  his  return  he  entered  the  B.  Y.  academy  of 
T^rovo,  taking  a  normal  course  and  graduating  in  1890. 
Taught  school  in  Ephraim  four  years.  Was  superinten- 
dent of  the  Sunday-schools  seA^eral  years,  also  superin- 
tendent of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  for  four  years.  Appointed 
bishop  to  succeed  his  father.  May  15,  1894.  Served  as 
City  Collector  two  years  and  was  elected  City  Treasurer 
in  '95.  He  oavus  a  small  farm  and  operates  it.  Was 
elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council.  Was  married  in 
Ephraim,  December  11,  1879,  to  Margaret,  daughter  of 
Christian  and  Karen  Neil  sen,  born  in  Ephraim  April  21, 


308  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

1861.  Her  parents  were  early  settlers,  father  died  in  '89, 
mother  still  living.  They  have  had  six  children,  Caro- 
line M.,  Orpha  O.  and  Sarah  M.,  living;  Margaret  G., 
Ellen  T.  and  Charles  B.,  deceased. 

DOKIUS,  BISHOP  C.  C.  N.,  deceased,  was  born  in 
Copenhagen,  April  5,  1830.  He  served  an  appren- 
ticeship as  a  cabinet-maker,  joined  the  Mormon 
church  when  quite  young,  and  became  a  traveling  elder. 
Came  to  Utah  in  '57,  crossing  the  plains  in  a  hand-cart 
company  under  Capt.  Fosgren,  reaching  Salt  Lake  City 
in  September.  In  the  company  was  the  bishop,  his  wife 
and  her  sister,  who  walked  all  the  distance  from  Iowa 
City,  and  Mrs.  Dorius's  mother,  who  came  in  a  wagon. 
They  were  ten  weeks  crossing  the  plains.  In  '58  he  came 
to  Ephraim.  In  'GO  he  returned  to  Koi'^'ay  on  a  three 
and  one-half  years'  mission,  being  president  of  the  Chris- 
tiania  conference.  On  his  return  was  appointel  bishop  by 
President  Young,  and  held  the  position  till  his  death, 
March  4,  1894.  He  sers'ed  as  Major  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  and  was  a  leader  in  educational  matters  and  public 
improvements,  being  well  liked  by  eveiybody.  Was  mar- 
ried first  in  England,  April  24,  1857,  to  Ellen  Bolfson. 
She  had  one  son,  C.  B.  Dorius,  now  bishop.  Second  wife 
was  Tomine  Fredericksen,  who  died,  leaving  four  chil- 
dren; first  wife  raising  the  two  living,  Anna  S.  Johnson 
and  p]llen  W.  Tliird  wife  was  Julia  P.  Peterson.  She 
has  five  cliildren,  Bebecca,  John  N.,  Julia,  Mabel  and 
Erastus.  Fourth  wife  was  Mary  Williams.  She  has  oio 
children.  Fifth  wife  was  Charlotte  Otterstrom.  She 
has  one  child,  Mar;\\ 

DOBirS,  EDWIK,  fanner,  son  of  John  F.  F.  and 
Gunild,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  February  6,  1866. 
He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and  now  owns  160  acres, 
north  of  the  city.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Cottonwood 
Tunnel  and  Canal  company.  Was  married  in  Manti 
temple,  February  19,  1890,  to  Nora,  daughter  of  John  E. 
and  Dorcas  Christensen,  bom  in  Ephraim,  July  18,  1872. 
They  have  two  childi^en,  Vivian,  bom  January  21,  1891, 
and  Helene,  February  28,  1895. 


MORONI    SEELY, 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


STUART   R.    SEELY. 
MT.   PLEASANT. 


W'M 

JbT*  ' 

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^  . 

^ftp'        '  '^*t^iH^^^Hr 

1 

HYRUM    SEELY, 
INDIANOLA. 


JOSEPH  SEELY. 
MT.  PLEASANT. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  309 

DORIUS,  JOHN,  JR.,  merchant,  son  of  John  F.  and 
Caroline  Frantzen,  Avas  born  in  Spring  Cit}^  June 
20,  18G0.  The  family  removed  to  Ephraim  when 
John  was  a  small  boy.  He  attended  the  public  schools 
and  was  engaged  several  years  in  freighting  produce  to 
Salt  Lake  City  and  mining  camps.  Was  engaged  as 
local  agent  for  the  Consolidated  Implement  Company  for 
three  years,  afterwards  opening  a  general  store.  He  has 
a  nice  place  of  business  and  a  good  trade.  Carries  about 
14000  stock  of  dry  goods,  gToceries,  boots  and  shoes  and 
clothing.  Also  owns  a  good  farm  of  sixty  acres.  Has 
been  deputy  City  Treasurer  for  the  past  four  years.  Was 
married  in  Salt  Lake  City  October  10,  1879,  to  Maria  S., 
daughter  of  Bishop  L.  S.  and  Sophia  Andei'son,  born  in 
Ephraim  December  11,  1860.  They  have  had  eight 
children:  Ruth  M.,  Mattie  S.,  Seymour  R.,  Hazel,  Grace 
and  Scena,  living;  John  C.  and  Marie,  deceased. 

DORIUS,  JOHN  F.  F.,  son  of  Nicalai  and  Anna  S. 
Christoffersen,  was  born  in  Copenhagen,  Denmark, 
June  15,  1832.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  shoemaker, 
joined  the  Monnon  church  in  1850  and  was  a  traveling 
elder  for  seven  years  in  Norway  and  Denmark.  In  1857 
he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  a  handcart  com- 
pany under  Capt.  Christiansen,  pulling  a  handcart  from 
Iowa  City  to  Salt  Lake  City.  He  remained  in  Salt  Lake 
till  1858,  when  he  came  to  Ephraim.  In  1860  he  returned 
to  Norway  on  a  mission,  remaining  till  1863.  Was  coun- 
sellor to  his  brother,  C.  C.  N.,  who  was  president  of  the 
Christiania  conference.  On  his  return  he  stopped  one 
year  in  Spring  City  and  returned  to  Ephraim.  Was  clerk 
several  years  in  the  Co-op.  store  and  engaged  in  farming. 
In  1876  he  went  on  a  second  two  years'  mission  to  Nor- 
way and  presided  over  the  conference.  In  1896  he  per- 
formed a  mission  to  Chicago,  111.,  returning  December, 
1897.  Is  senior  president  of  the  forty-seventh  quorum  of 
seventies  and  has  always  been  an  active  churchman.  His 
first  wife  was  Caroline  Frantzen.  She  had  five  children: 
Martha  M.,  John,  Caroline,  Heber  and  Orson.  She  died 
in  Ephraim  in  1895.    Second  wife  was  Gunnell  Torgesen. 


310  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

She  had  seven  children:  Sarah,  Edwin,  Joseph,  Hyrum, 
Augusta,  Clara  and  Agnes.  Third  wife  Avas  Anna  M. 
Staalsen.  She  had  seven  children:'  Oliver,  Dora,  Charles, 
Alma,  Lewis,  Ida  and  Relies. 

DORIUS,  LEWIS  O.,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  was  bom 
in  Denmark  September  5,  1841.  The  family  came 
to  Utah  in  1855,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train 
under  Capt.  Guvm'an,  and  stopped  in  Salt  Lake  City. 
Many  of  the  company  died  on  the  road  from  cholera,  and 
Lewis  was  compelled  to  dig  roots  for  food  after  reaching 
Salt  Lake,  lie  came  to  Ephraim  in  1856,  where  he  grew 
up  and  followed  farming.  Purchased  a  small  farm  and 
now  owns  seventy -five  acres,  which  he  works  and  raises 
stock.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Dawk  war,  being  in  the 
Salina  Canyon  and  (Jrass  V<alley  engagements.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  seveial  years,  and  one  of  the 
high  council  a  number  of  years.  Was  a  bishop's  counsel- 
lor seventeen  years.  In  1802  he  went  to  the  Missouri 
river  after  emigrants.  Was  married  in  Ephraim  October 
4,  1863,  to  Maiw  Ann  111111,  who  had  one  child.  Mother 
and  child  died.  ^larned  again  April  11,  1807,  to  Caro- 
line, daughter  of  Ilans  and  Annie  K.  Jensen,  born  in 
Denmark  September  4,  1S47.  She  has  five  living  child- 
ren: Julia  A.,  Lewis  N.,  Hannah  D.,  Charles  and  Clara  J. 
Third  wife  was  Pauline  Pehrsen.  Her  parents  came  here 
in  1862,  being  in  a  company  of  400  of  whom  200  died  on 
the  route.  She  has  live  living  children:  Ellen  C,  Marj^ 
A.,  Annie,  Cordelia  and  Peter  W. 

FKANDSEX,  CHRISTIAN,  farmer,  son  of  Anders  C. 
Frandsen  and  Margaret  Christensen  Frandsen,  was 
born  in  Denmark  March  10,  1849.  He  was  raised  on 
a  farm  and  in  1872  came  to  Ephraim,  where  he  engaged 
in  farming.  In  1885  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to 
Denmark,  traveling  over  the  Aalborg  conference  and  pre- 
siding two  years  over  Hjorriug  branch.  Upon  his  return 
he  engaged  as  miller  for  Neils  Thompson  for  several 
years.  Served  as  counsellor  to  the  president  of  the  Y. 
M.  M.  I.  A.  for  some  time  and  has  been  a  worker  in  the 
Sunday  school  fourteen  years.    Served  as  City  Councilor 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  311 

two  terms,  being  re-elected  in  1897.  Was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City  November  14,  1878,  to  Anna  K.,  daughter  of 
Jorgen  C.  and  Caroline  Jensen,  born  in  Denmark  August 
1,  1854.  They  have  had  seven  children:  Matilda,  Annie 
L.,  Carl  C,  Clara  L.,  Hari'y  L.  and  Ledru  E.,  living;  Har- 
old, deceased. 

/^REAVES,  HON.  PETEE,'SE.,  buyer  and  shipper  of 
Vj  wool,  hides  and  grain,  son  of  Thomas  and  Dorothy, 
^  was  born  in  Paterson,  X.  J.,  August  26,  1837.  The 
family  removed  to  Ohio  when  he  was  seven  years  old, 
thence  to  St.  Louis,  where  they  remained  till  1850. 
Father  died  in  St.  Louis  in  1819,  mother  died  when  Peter 
was  small  and  stepmother  brought  him  to  Utah.  They 
started  from  Kanesville  in  1852  in  an  ox-train  and  ar- 
rived in  Salt  Lake  City  in  September,  locating  in  Provo, 
where  he  learned  the  carpenter's  trade.  He  came  to 
Ephraim  in  August,  1856,  received  a  small  piece  of  land 
and  followed  farming  and  carpentering.  He  soon  en- 
gaged in  buying  and  shipping  grain  and  produce.  Tn 
1886  the  firm  of  C.  Andrews  &  Co,  was  formed  with  head- 
quarters at  Nephi,  he  became  president  and  has  since 
held  the  position.  They  do  an  extensive  business  in  buy- 
ing and  shipping  wool,  hides  and  grain  and  he  attends  to 
the  Ephraim  branch.  He  owns  over  100  acres  of  land 
and  a  comfortable  residence  in  the  city.  Is  also  inter- 
ested in  the  Climax  Eoller  Mill.  Was  a  member  of  the 
City  Council  for  eight  years  in  early  times.  In  1891  was 
elected  to  the  Territorial  Legislature  and  is  now  chair- 
man of  the  Board  of  County  Commissioners.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Manti  June  20,  1858,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of 
William  and  Elizabeth  Motley,  bom  in  Herefordshire, 
England,  June  10,  1837.  They  have  had  nine  children: 
Peter,  John,  Lillie,  Albert  M.,  Sarah  L.  and  Minnie  M., 
living;  William  T.,  Margaret  and  Roy,  deceased. 

CREATES,  PETER,  JR.,  merchant,  son  of  Peter  and 
Elizabeth  Motley,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  September 
14,  1859.  When  a  boy  he  worked  on  the  farm  sum- 
mers and  attended  school  in  winters.  At  the  age  of 
19  he  attended  the  Deseret  Universitv  where  he  studied 


312  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

one  and  one-lialf  years  and  returned.  Was  engaged  as 
teacher  in  Sanpete  county  until  1895,  being  principal  of 
the  Ephraim  schools  for  several  years.  Served  as  County 
Superintendent  of  Schools  for  seven  years  and  City  Re- 
corder eight  years.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
two  years.  On  October  1,  1896,  he  opened  his  present 
place  of  business,  Avhere  he  carries  a  full  line  of  dry 
goods,  groceries,  notions,  hats  and  caps,  boots  and  shoes, 
tinware  and  general  merchandise.  He  is  an  energetic 
and  successful  business  man.  His  wife  was  Catherine, 
daughter  of  Jens  C.  and  Jensina  Moi-tensen,  born  in  Den- 
mark October  28,  18(30.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  October  0,  1882,  and  have  had  six  children:  Renel 
M.,  Hazel  11,  (lescal,  Orover  P.  and  Amy  I.,  living,  Elva- 
tina,  deceased. 

QREEX,  HE^'I{Y,  farmer,  son  of  Charles  and  Mary, 
was  born  in  (Uoucestershire,  England,  March  11, 
1832.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to 
Utah  in  1853,  crossing  the  plains  in  James  Young's  com- 
pany, and  locating  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  1850  he  came 
to  Ephraim  and  engaged  in  farming.  He  now  owns 
about  100  acres,  and  has  a  tine  residence  in  the  city.  He 
has  been  a  member  of  the  City  Council  for  several  years. 
His  wife  was  Betsey,  daughter  of  William  and  Rose  Mee, 
born  in  Coalville,  l^eiscestershire,  England,  March  4, 
1842.  They  were  married  in  Ephraim^March  18,  1860, 
and  hare  seven  children:  Sarah  E.,  wife  of  John  Beal; 
John  S.,  William  T.,  Fannie  C,  Joseph  P.,  Mary  A.  and 
James. 

It  ANSEN,  ANDREW,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  son  of 
jl  Andrew  N.  and  Christina,  was  born  in  Richfield, 
'  Utah,  February  16,  1866.  In  1867  the  family  came 
to  Ephraim,  where  Andrew  was  raised  on  a  farm.  He 
has  100  acres  of  land  and  he  and  his  brother,  Adolph, 
are  starting  a  prune  orchard.  He  is  also  interested  in 
the  stock  business.  Was  married  in  Logan  temple  April 
21,  1887,  to  Zina,  daughter  of  George  and  Mary  A.  Tay- 
lor, born  in  Ephraim  January  29,  1867.  They  have  four 
children:     George  A.,  Mona,  Delilah  and  Paul  G. 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  313 

M  ANSEN,  ANDEEW  N.,  usually  known  as  Tailor  Han- 
n  sen,  was  born  in  Norway  March  6,  1836.  He 
'  learned  the  trade  of  a  tailor,  joined  the  Mormon 
churcli  in  1860,  and  in  1863  came  to  Utah,  crossing-  the 
plains  in  Capt.  Nebeker's  train  and  located  in  Salt  Lake 
City.  Came  to  Ephraim  in  1861,  and  in  1865  removed 
to  Kichtield,  remaining-  two  years,  when  he  was  com- 
pelled to  leave  on  account  of  Indians,  losing  all  he  had. 
Returned  to  Ephraim  and  opened  a  tailor  shop,  having 
his  brother  Hans  with  him  for  several  years.  He  now 
owns  a  farm  of  200  acres  and  is  one  of  the  largest  and 
most  successful  farmers  of  Ephraim.  He  served  through 
the  Black  Hawk  war  and  did  his  share.  Was  married 
in  Ivichtield  in  April,  1865,  to  Jensina,  daughter  of  Chris- 
tian and  Annie  E.  Peterson,  born  in  Denmark  May  12^ 
1814.  They  have  had  nine  children:  Andrew,  Parley^ 
Adolph,  Joseph,  Thorwald,  Christian  and  Ann  E.,  living  j 
Lina  and  Ida,  deceased. 

MANSEN,  CHHISTIAN,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  and 
jl  Dorthea,  was  born  in  Denmark  August  29,  1846. 
'  lie  joined  the  jMormon  churcli  and  came  to  Utah  in 
1866,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capt. 
Lowry,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  The  company  wa» 
nearly  nine  weeks  on  the  road,  many  dying  of  cholera 
and  thirty-two  oxen  dying  just  before  reaching  Salt  Lake 
City.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and  was  en- 
gaged six  weeks  in  killing  grasshoppers  during  what  i» 
known  as  the  grasshopper  war.  In  1893  he  went  on  a 
two  years'  mission  to  Denmark.  Owns  a  forty-acre  farm 
and  residence  in  the  city.  Was  married  in  Denmark 
February  18,  1866,  to  Elsie  M.,  daughter  of  Johan  and 
Inger  M.  Johansen,  born  in  Denmark  March  10,  1841. 
They  have  had  nine  children:  Hans  C,  Canute  P., 
George,  Ephraim,  John,  Erinda  and  Sarah,  living;  Eliza 
and  Wilford,  deceased. 

M  ANSEN,  JAMES  H.,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  and  Annie, 
Jl  was  born  in  Denmark  May  4,  1848.  The  family 
'  emigrated  to  Utah  in  1853,  crossing  the  plains  in 
Capt.  Olsen's  company  and  located  in  Ephraim  in  No- 


^14  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

vember,  1854.  His  father  was  prominent  in  the  Mormon 
church,  and  died  in  Ephraim  July  30,  1895.  Mother 
died  August  31,  1895.  James  has  followed  farm- 
ing and  running  threshing  machines  and  harvesters. 
He  OAvns  about  100  acres  of  land.  Was  a  member  of  the 
City  Council  for  eight  years  and  is  an  active  Democratic 
politician.  He  performed  a  mission  to  Denmark  in  1880 
and  1882  and  is  president  of  the  quorum  of  elders.  His 
wife  was  Olivia,  daughter  of  Ole  C.  and  Margaret  Jorg- 
ensen  Olsen,  born  m  Copenhagen  April  5,  1854.  Her 
father  was  bishop  of  Mayfield  many  years,  and  the 
father  of  James  H.  was  a  rapid  translator,  doing  much 
work  in  translating  from  English  to  the  Danish  language. 
They  have  ten  children:  Jennie  O.,  Annie  A.,  James, 
Hans  T.,  Wilford  C,  John  W.,  Grover  A.,  Carrie  E.,  Eva 
L.  and  Alonzo  L. 


IlANSEN,  HON.  JAMES  P.,  JR.,  farmer  and  stock- 
||  raiser,  son  of  James  P.  and  Bendecta,  was  born 
/  in  Spanish  Fork,  Utah,  October  16,  1859.  His  pa- 
rents removed  to  Ephraim  when  he  was  three  weeks  old 
and  located  where  they  now  reside.  He  attended  the 
schools  of  Ephraim,  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo  and 
the  Deseret  University  at  Salt  Lake  City.  Taught  school 
in  Ephraim  for  several  years,  then  gave  his  attention  to 
farming.  He  now  has  a  nice  farm  of  seventy  acres  and 
200  acres  of  pasture  land.  Was  City  Treasurer  two 
years.  City  Justice  four  years.  City  Councillor  two  years 
and  present  school  trustee.  Was  elected  Mayor  in  1897 
on  the  Democratic  ticket.  In  church  matters  he  has  ta- 
ken an  active  part,  being  a  home  missionary  for  a  num- 
ber of  years  and  alternate  in  the  high  council.  W^as  for 
several  years  superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school  and 
president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.,  afterward  being  secre- 
taiy,  treasurer  and  holding  other  positions.  He  was 
married  in  the  Logan  temple  April  21,  1887,  to  Hattie 
Taylor.  They  have  two  children,  Eva  and  Pearl.  Was 
married  again  in  the  Manti  temple  September  29,  1897, 
to  Caroline,  daughter  of  David  and  Mary  Thompson,  born 
in  Ephraim  December  14,  1864. 


1 


HISTORY   OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  315 

11  ANSEN,  LAKS  C,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  and  Dorthea,. 
Jl  was  born  in  Denmark  December  16,  1839.  He 
'  joined  the  INFormon  clnircli  against  his  parents' 
wishes,  left  home  on  that  account,  and  was  a  traveling 
elder  four  years.  Came  to  Utah  in  18G5,  crossing  the 
plains  in  Capt.  Atwood's  company,  and  located  in  Eph- 
raini.  ^Aiis  at  once  engaged  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
guarding  and  herding  stock.  He  constructed  two  lime 
kilns  and  burnt  lime  for  many  years,  then  purchased  a 
farm;  now  having  sixty  acres,  and  carrying  on  farming 
and  hog-raising,  having  as  many  as  100  hogs.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Fairview  January  19,  1866,  to  Karen  J.  Hansen. 
They  have  had  ten  children:  Caroline,  Louis,  Heber, 
jMerne,  Kirhard,  Xephi,  Henry,  Anthon  and  Eva,  living; 
Olivia,  deceased. 

IjANSEN,  THOEWALD  W.,  merchant,  proprietor  of 
Jl  the  Golden  Eule,  dealer  in  ladies'  and  gents'  fur- 
*  nishings  and  notions,  son  of  John  J.  and  Fredrikke, 
was  born  in  Copenhagen  August  30,  1868.  In  1878  the 
family  came  to  Utah  and  located  in  Ephraim,  where  he 
was  raised.  At  the  age  of  20  he  engaged  as  clerk  in 
the  Co-op.  store  and  became  manager.  In  October,  1896, 
he  opened  a  store  of  his  own,  and  in  1898  erected  a  fine 
business  block  at  a  cost  of  about  |2500,  in  which  he  car- 
ries a  well-selected  stock.  Was  married  in  Ephraim 
December  23,  1891,  to  Sarah  A.,  daughter  of  Henry  and 
Stina  Beal,  born  in  Ephraim  March  27,  1872.  They  have 
two  children:  Ivan  A.^  born  January  18,  1896,  and  Glen 
L.,  born  June  29,  1898. 

ISAACSON,  PETER,  farmer,  son  of  Isaac  and  Anna 
M.,  war  born  in  Denmark  May  30,  1828.  He  learned 
the  trade  of  a  carpentei',  joined  the  Mormon  church 
in  1854,  and  came  to  Utah  via  New  Orleans,  stopping 
awhile  in  western  Missouri.  Drove  a  team  across  the 
plains,  and  spent  one  winter  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  1858 
he  came  to  Ephraim  and  worked  at  his  trade  until  he 
secured  a  small  farm.  In  1876  he  was  called  to  Arizona 
to  help  settle  the  country  and  civilize  the  Indians.  He 
remained  there  till  1893,  engaged  in  farming  and  stock- 


316  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

raising,  and  returned  to  Ephraim,  where  he  now  owns 
forty  acres  of  land.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  being  Captain  of  fifty,  and  was  in  the  Eph- 
raim canyon  when  two  men  were  killed.  Was  married 
in  Missouri  to  Anna  M.  Paulsen,  who  died  in  a  few 
months.  Married  again  in  Salt  Lake  City  April  21,  1857, 
to  Martha  C.  Clemenson,  bom  in  Denmark.  She  had 
four  children:  Isaac,  Anna  M.,  and  Martin,  living;  Peter 
I.,  deceased. 

JENSEX,  ADOLPII  W.,  principal  of  the  Ephraim 
schools,  son  of  Jens  P.  and  Dorthea,  was  born  in 
Ephraim  March  10,  1871.  He  attended  the  public 
(Schools  of  this  city  and  took  a  course  of  one  year  in  the 
B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo.  Began  teaching  the  primary 
department,  was  promoted  to  the  grammar  grade,  and  in 
1895  became  principal  of  the  schools.  Under  his  man- 
agement the  schools  have  prospered  and  he  has  the  good 
will  of  parents,  pupils  and  subordinates.  Is  a  member 
of  the  Mormon  church,  and  for  two  years  was  president 
of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  Is  second  assistant  superintendent 
of  tlie  Sunday-scliools  and  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
Stake  Sabbath  schools.  Was  elected  a  member  of  the 
City  Council  in  1897  on  the  Republican  ticket.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Manti  June  5,  1895,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  John 
and  Elizabeth  James.  They  have  two  children:  Adolph 
L.  and  Evart  J. 

JENSEN,  CHRISTIAN  S.,  farmer,  son  of  Jens  and 
Elsie,  was  born  in  Denmark  March  12,  182G.  He 
joined  the  ^Mormon  church  in  1855  and  in  1856  came 
to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  and  suffering 
much  from  hunger  and  cold.  He  lost  three  yoke  of  oxen, 
one  of  their  children  died,  and  they  arrived  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  through  a  relief  company,  in  over  three  feet  of  snow, 
with  nothing  left.  In  1857  he  came  to  Ephraim,  assisted 
in  building  the  fort  and  lived  in  it  for  two  years.  Served 
in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Before  coming  to  this  country 
be  served  one  year  in  the  war  against  Germany,  receiv- 
ing a  bullet  in  the  left  shoulder.  In  his  battalion  w^ere 
1300  men,  900  being  killed  or  wounded  in  one  day.     He 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  317 

went  to  Circle  Valley  to  help  settle  the  country,  but  had 
to  leave  after  building  a  home,  on  account  of  Indians. 
Was  head  watemiaster  fifteen  years.  Is  one  of  the  high 
priests.  Was  married  in  Denmark  to  Karen  Jensen. 
She  died  in  Ephraim  March  3,  1897,  leaving  one  living 
son:  Hans  C.  Second  wife  was  Trena  Neilson,  native  of 
Denmark.  She  has  three  children:  Christina,  James  C. 
and  Annie. 

JEXSEX,  HANS  C,  fanner,  son  of  Jens  and  Kirsteu, 
was  bom  in  Denmark  January  25,  1834.  He  learned 
the  trade  of  a  miller,  and  in  1861  he  came  to  Utah, 
bringing  his  mother,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Pres- 
ton's train,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  He  went  to  Circle 
Valley  to  assist  the  settlers,  and  in  company  with  his 
brother,  P.  C,  and  Ivor  Peterson,  constructed  a  grist 
mill,  propelled  by  Avind  power.  In  1866  they  were  driven 
out  by  Indians,  losing  ever\'thing,  and  returned  to  Eph- 
raim. Hans  then  run  ^Villardsen's  mill  for  eight  years 
and  went  to  farming,  which  he  still  carries  on  successful- 
ly, owning  250  acres  of  land.  Was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  two  terms.  Married  in  Salt  Lake  City  July  31, 
1871,  to  Nellie,  daughter  of  Lars  and  Christina  Lund- 
stein,  born  in  Sweden.  She  died  May  5,  1891.  They  had 
ten  children:  Amelia,  Louesa,  Hans  C,  Harold  W.  and 
Edgar  M.,  living;  John  H.,  Mcolina,  Ada,  Royal  F.  and 
Nellie,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  JENS  P.,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  and  Annie  K. 
Hansen,  was  born  in  Housenge,  Denmark,  December 
12,  1815.  He  was  raised  to  fanning,  joined  the  Mor- 
mon church  and  came  to  Utah  in  1866,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train  under  Capt.  Abner  Lowiy,  and  located  at 
Ephraim.  Bought  five  acres  of  land  and  now  owns 
seventj'-five  acres.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil for  several  years.  Before  leaving  Denmark  he  was 
a  traveling  elder  two  years,  and  in  1882  went  back  as  a 
missionary,  remaining  about  two  years.  Was  married 
in  Salt  Lake  City  October  23,  1866,  to  Dorthea  Jensen,  a 
native  of  Denmark.  They  have  had  eight  children: 
Peter  D.,  Adolph  W".,  Sophia  K.,  Hans  E.  and  Christian 


318  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

K.,  living;  Jens  J.  A.,  Anna  K.   and  Josephine  E.,  de- 
ceased. 

JENSEN,  JOHN  C,  deceased,  fanner  and  wheelwright, 
son  of  Jens  and  Johanna.  M.,  was  born  in  Denmark 
June  24,  1828,  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  wheel- 
wright, joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah  in 
18G2,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Bishop 
Madsen,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  Was  a  prominent  man 
in  church  affairs  and  for  many  years  counsellor  to  the 
president  of  the  elder's  quorum.  He  followed  his  trade 
of  a  wheelwright  and  died  here  November  17,  1889,  Was 
married  in  Denmark  to  Annie  S.,  daughter  of  Neils  and 
Dorthea  Christensen  Neilsen,  born  in  Denmark  July  24, 
1835.  They  had  twelve  children:  John  C,  Daniel  C, 
Charles  F,,  Andrew  N.,  Benjamin  L.  and  Erastus  T.,  liv- 
ing; Jens  J.,  Johanna  D.,  Martina  B.,  Marinus  L,,  Jensina 
J,  and  Mina,  deceased;  four  died  while  crossing  the  ocean. 

JENSEN,  OLE  C,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  son  of  Hans 
and  Hetta,  was  born  in  Denmark  September  2,  1854. 
The  family  came  to  Utah  in  1863,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train,  and  located  in  Ephraim,  remaining  ten 
3'ears,  when  they  removed  to  Levan,  where  they  now  re- 
side. Ole  grew  up  to  farm  life  and  freighted  produce  to 
the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada.  He  bought  a 
small  farm  and  cultivates  it,  having  also  about  100  head 
of  stock.  He  and  his  father  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  being  in  a  partj'  that  were  driven  from  Ephraim 
canyon,  losing  their  teams.  Is  interested  in  a  threshing 
machine  and  follows  that  work  every  fall.  Was  married 
in  Spring  City  July  23,  1877,  to  Maria,  daughter  of  Soren 
and  Karen  M.  Mortensen,  bom  in  Denmark  November 
15,  1853.  They  have  had  ten  children:  Hans  O.,  Myrtle, 
Or\'el,  Randolph,  Caroline,  Edwin,  Ross,  Selma  and  an 
Infant,  living;  Franklin,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  P.  C,  known  as  P.  C.  Jensen  Kjolbye,  son  of 
Jens  and  Kirsten,  was  born  in  Denmark  April  24, 
1830.     He  learned  the  trade  of  a  carpenter,  joined 
the  Mormon  church,  and  in  1862  came  to  Utah,  crossing 


I 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  819 

the  plains  in  Capt.  Maclsen's  company,  and  located  in 
Epliraim,  where  he  followed  his  trade  for  several  years. 
In  1865  lie  went  to  Circle  A'alley,  built  a  grist  mill  and 
good  home,  which  he  lost  with  several  cattle,  when  the 
settlers  were  driven  out  by  Indians.  He  returned  to 
Ephraim  and  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Oper- 
ated a  meat  market  several  years,  then  went  to  farming 
and  wool-growing,  now  having  4000  sheep.  In  1877  he 
went  on  a  mission  of  tAventy-six  months  to  Copenhagen. 
Was  married  in  Denmark  in  18G0  to  Mary  C.  Christensen. 
The}'  have  had  five  children:  Jacob,  Martin,  Peter  and 
James,  living;  Elsina,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  PETEE  D.,  teacher  of  the  grammar  grade  of 
the  public  schools,  residing  in  Ephraim,  son  of  Jens 
P.  and  Dorthea,  was  born  in  Ephraim  May  17,  1869. 
He  was  raised  to  farm  work  and  attended  the  Ephraim 
district  schools.  Taught  school  during  the  winter  of 
1891  and  1892,  then  entered  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Prove, 
taking  a  two  years'  normal  course.  Taught  three  years 
at  Monroe  and  one  in  Manti.  Is  an  active  worker  in  the 
Sundaj^-school  and  missionary  for  Sanpete  county.  Was 
married  in  Manti  temple  September  26,  1894,  to  Sarah 
J.,  daughter  of  Nephi  and  Maij  A.  J.  Eees,  born  in  Wales, 
this  county,  December  13,  1873.  They  have  two  children: 
Eva  D.,  born  in  Wales,  July  3,  1895;  and  Delille,  born  in 
Ephraim  June  30,  1897. 

JENSEN,  RASMUS,  farmer,  son  of  Jens  and  Mary 
Jorgensen,  was  born  in  Denmark  January  31,  1842. 
He  was  raised  on  a,  farm,  joined  the  Mormon  church 
and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Saunder's 
ox-train,  and  located  in  Ephraim  in  October,  1863.  His 
parents  and  brother  came  in  1866,  mother  died  on  the 
road  and  father  here  in  1888.  Easmus  took  part  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war;  was  in  the  canyon  when  three  persons 
were  killed  by  Indians,  and  had  to  run  for  his  life.  In 
1868  he  went  to  the  North  Platte  river  after  emigrants. 
Was  engaged  several  years  in  freighting  i)roduce  to  the 
mining  camps,  then  bought  a  farm,  now  owns  100  acres 
and  considerable  cattle,  being  a  successful  man.  W^as 
married  in  Ephraim  October  22,  1876,  to  Ingabor  Iversen. 


320  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

She  has  three  children:  James,  Erastus  and  Orson.     Also 
has  one  by  former  marriage:  Gustaye  A.  Iversen. 

JENSEN,  SOKEN  P.,  farmer,  son  of  Peter  and  Ker- 
sten,  was  born  in  Denmark  xlugust  17,  1843.  The 
family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated  in 
1862,  crossing  the  plains  in  Bishop  Madsen's  train,  and 
located  in  Moroni.  Father  died  in  Moroni  May  18,  1872; 
mother  May  20,  1880.  In  1863  Soren  came  to  Ephraim 
and  engaged  in  faiTiiing.  He  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  being  in  the  Salina  canyon  and  other  engage- 
ments. In  1866  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river,  in  Capt. 
Abner  Lowiy's  company,  after  emigrants.  He  purchased 
a  small  farm  and  now  has  sixty  acres  and  a  good  home  in 
the  city.  Is  also  interested  in  a  threshing  machine, 
which  he  works  every  year.  In  1889  he  went  on  a  two 
years'  mission  to  Denmark.  Was  married  in  Ephraim 
to  Mary  Cliristeusen.  She  had  six  children:  Mary, 
Peter,  Maria,  Christian,  Soren  and  Elvina.  Wife  died 
and  he  married  Dorthea  Folkersen,  who  also  died,  leaving 
two  children:  Sidonia  and  Wilford.  Was  married  again 
September  8,  1897,  to  Martina  King. 

JOHANSEN,  AUGUST,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
Carl  and  Keisa,  was  born  in  Sweden,  November  24, 
1845.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and 
father  and  mother  emigrated  in  1863,  August,  arriving  in 
1864,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Bishop 
Preston,  and  located  in  Epliraim.  They  took  part  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war  and  parents  both  died  here.  August 
reached  Ephraim  without  a  dollar  and  owing  for  his  fare 
across  the  plains,  now  has  6,000  sheep  which  he  and  his 
two  eldest  sons  handle  successfully,  besides  conducting  a 
good  fann.  He  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  November 
30, 1867,  to  Christina  Jorgensen.  They  have  ten  children, 
Charles,  Annie,  Edwin,  Clara,  Josephine,  Arthur,  George, 
Rupert,  Albert  and  Harold. 

JOHNSON,  ALBERT,  proprietor  of  Ephraim  saw  and 
planing  mill,  son  of  Christen  and  Nicoline.  was  born 
in  Norway,  April  18,  1868.    He  and  a  sister  came  to 
Ephraim  in  1880  and  he  learned  the  carpenter's  trade. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  321 

In  1889  lie  and  Maclsen  Bros,  secured  the  present  loca- 
tion, then  an  old  mill  known  as  Tlioi-pe's,  and  put  in 
wood  working  machinery,  using  water  power,  in  1891 
he  purchased  the  entire  business  and  is  doing  well  in  'con- 
tracting and  building  and  furnishing  materials,  lie  has 
erected  several  fine  buildings  in  this  city.  In  January, 
1898,  he  put  in  a  steam  plant  and  employs  iwo  to  four 
men.  Is  a  stock-holder  in  the  Gunnison  roller  mills  and 
interested  in  a  saw-mill  east  of  the  city.  Was  maiTied 
in  Ephraim,  December  28,  1892,  to  Jennie,  thnighter  ef 
Niels  and  Catherine  Thompson,  born  in  Epliraim,  No- 
vember 7,  1872.  They  have  three  children,  Lucile,  ( jrace 
and  Ivobert  A. 

JOi^GENSEN,  JOiJGEX,  farmer,  son  of  Jens  C.  and 
Caroline,  was  born  in  Denmark,  June  18,  1851.  The 
family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Bishop  Madsen's  company,  teach- 
ing Ephraim  in  Xovember,  18G2.  Jorgen  and  his  father 
quarried  rock  for  many  years,  furnishing  material  for 
numerous  buildings  in  Ex)liraim.  The  par-ents  removed 
to  Lehi.  He  does  some  quaiT-ying,  but  devotees  nrost  of 
his  time  to  handlirrg  a  ninet3'-acre  farTir,  which  he  owns. 
Took  i)ar't  in  the  Black  Hawk  war;  went  on  a  '.ission  to 
Denmark  in  1896,  and  was  watermaster  for  iif t(}en  years. 
Was  marTied  in  Salt  Lake  City,  March  9,  1874,  to  Dorcas, 
darrghter  of  Andrew  and  Margaret  Larsen,  born  in  Den- 
mark, November  30,  1852.  They  have  had  eleven  chil- 
dren, Camilla,  George  A.,  Enoch,  Kebecca,  Orpa,  Gil- 
bert and  Lyman  living;  Trena,  Nora,  Josephine  and  John 
H.  deceased. 

CARSEN,  CHRISTIAN,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  s,.n 
of  Christen  and  Maria  C,  was  born  in  Denmark, 
raim,  September  18,  1869.  He  was  raised  to  farm 
work  and  now  owns  120  acres  of  good  land,  seventy  head 
of  cattle  and  is  a  prosperous  young  farmer.  "Was  mar- 
ried in  Ephraim,  November  15,  1893,  to  Sarah,  da  lighter 
of  Gustav  and  Fredrikke  Soderberg,  born  in  Epliraim, 
Apr-il  24,  1873.  They  have  two  children,  Ira  D.,  born  \u- 
gust  30, 1894,  and  Evan  C,  November  12,  1896. 


322   •  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

CAKSEN,  CHRISTEN  A.,  fanner  and  stock-raiser,  son 
of  Giiristen  and  Maria  C,  was  born  in  Denmark, 
March  G,  183G.  His  parents  joined  the  Mornion 
church  in  1852  and  father  was  an  elder  in  the  church. 
In  December,  1853,  the  family  started  for  Utah  and  ar- 
rived in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  5,  1854,  in  Captain  01- 
sen's  company  of  ox-teams.  Parents  came  to  Ephraim 
in  fall  of  1854,  father  paying  the  fares  of  twenty  •)thers, 
had  nothing  when  he  aiTived.  Father  died  in  Xephi  in 
1887,  mother  died  in  Denmark  when  Christen  was  i)  years 
of  age.  He  remained  in  Salt  Lake  City  two  years,  then 
came  to  Ephraim,  receiving  a  small  piece  of  land,  which 
he  has  added  to,  and  now  owns  over  300  acres,  being  in 
terested  in  stock-raising.  During  the  Black  Hawk  war 
he  was  an  active  participant,  at  one  time  in  a  skirmish 
with  Indians  having  a  horse  shot  from  under  him.  ^^'as 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  two  years.  Does  some 
money  loaning  for  himself  and  others.  He  is  a  strong 
believer  in  free  speech  and  i-eligious  freedom.  Was  ex- 
communicated from  the  church  about  1871,  and  later 
ei-ected  a  large  hall  by  his  residence  and  fitetd  it  up,  giv- 
ing any  and  all  denominations  the  privilege  of  using  it 
for  many  years.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  May  IS,  1858, 
to  Mary-  A.,  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Annie  Jensen,  born 
in  Denmark.  Thej'  have  seven  children,  William,  i^Iary, 
Annie,  Christian,  Olivia,  Alma  C.  and  Zenobia. 

CARSEN,  O.  P.,  farmer  and  stock-raiser,  son  of 
Christen  and  Johanna  M.,  Avas  born  in  Denmark, 
October  G,  1840.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  emigrated  in  1855,  stopping  in  Burlington, 
Iowa,  until  1857,  when  they  crossed  the  plains  in  Capt. 
Cowley's  company.  He  came  to  Ephraim  in  1858,  par- 
ents and  four  children  coming  in  18G0.  Father  died  here 
in  1884,  mother  in  18G2.  In  i8G2  C.  P.  went  back  to  the 
Missouri  river  for  emigrants.  He  served  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  was  in  the  skirmishes  in  Salina  canyon 
and  Grass  Valley.  Was  married  in  Ephraim,  April  9, 
1862,  to  Mary,  daughter  of  Rasmus  and  Caroline  Larsen. 
Her  parents  came  to  Ephraim  in  1854  among  the  first 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  323 

settlers,  and  both  died  here.  She  has  had  ten  children. 
Peter,  Easmus,  Nora,  Amelia,  Eosella,  John  C,  Eaymond 
and  Mabel  living;  Ole  and  Caroline  Y.,  deceased. 

CAESEX,  GEOEGE,  deceased,  son  of  Christian  and 
Mary,  ay  as  born  in  Denmark,  November  10,  1846. 
The  family  came  to  Utah  in  1851  and  located  in 
Ephraim.  He  was  raised  a  farmer  and  continued  the 
work  till  his  death,  January  29,  1873.  In  the  Black  Hawk 
war  he  was  a  minute  man,  going-  on  manj'  trips  after  In- 
dians. Was  an  active  churchman  and  Avent  back  to  the 
Missouri  river  in  1866  after  emigrants.  He  was  in  the 
engagements  with  Indian's  east  of  Ephraim  and  in  the 
canyon,  seeing  the  thi-<eo  men  killed.  Was  married  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  November  2,  1867,  to  Kisty,  daughter  of 
JRasmus  and  Anna  C.  Johnson,  born  on  the  island  of  Fals- 
ter,  Denmark,  November  22,  1818.  They  had  three  chil- 
dren, Anna  C,  wife  of  Charles  Nelson;  George  C.  and 
Lillie,  wife  of  Christian  Willardson.  Mrs.  Larsen  came 
from  Denmark  in  1853  and  was  in  Manti  when  a  list  of 
settlers  was  made  for  Ephraim.  Her  father  was  the  fii'st 
Danishman  to  sign  the  roll.  He  helped  build  the  forts 
and  served  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Father  died  July  2, 
1871;  mother,  March  11,  1889. 

CAESEN,  H.  P.,  druggist,  son  of  Michael  and  Annie 
K.,  was  born  in  Horbelov,  Island  of  Falster,  Den- 
mark, January  15, 1857.  He  attended  the  schools  of 
his  native  country  and  then  studied  for  overseer  of  a 
farm.  His  father  died  and  mother  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  came  to  Utah  with  him  and  sister,  Karen  M., 
locating  a  short  time  at  Scipio  and  coiaing  to  Ephraim  in 
1873.  He  learned  the  carpenter  trade  which  he  followed 
for  T,  number  of  years.  Studied  music  and  became  a 
teacher  of  the  violin  and  leader  of  the  city  orchestra. 
Then  studied  pharmacy  under  Dr.  W.  H.  Olsten,  and  be- 
came a  regislered  pharmacist.  He  opened  his  drug  store 
in  1887  and  has  a  fine  place,  the  first  one  in  Ephraim,  car- 
TA'ing  drugs,  medicines,  chemicals,  toilet  articles,  paints, 
oil?;,  groceries,  hardware,  and  is  doing  a  very  successful 


324  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

business.  He  was  appointed  postmaster  in  November, 
1887,  and  resigned  in  October,  1897.  Is  a  member  of  the 
Utah  Pharmaceutical  association  and  an  active  Demo- 
cratic politician.  INIarried  in  Salt  Lake  City  to  Sarah  E. 
Christensen.  She  died  leaving  one  child,  Sarah  E.  Was 
married  again  to  Mar}^  A.  Larson.  They  have  two  chil- 
dren, Rhoda  E.  and  Aubrey  M. 

pARSEN,  JAMES  P.,  fanner,  son  of  Christen  S.  and 
I  Johanna  M.,  Avas  bom  in  Denmark  March  11,  1842. 
The  family  joined  the  Momion  church  and  emi- 
grated in  1855,  stopping  at  Burlington,  la.,  for  lack  of 
funds  till  1850,  when  they  came  to  Utah  in  an  ox-train 
under  Capt.  James  Brown,  ai\d  located  in  Ephraim, 
wheiH?  parents  died.  James  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  being  in  the  Salina  canyon  engagement  and  shot 
through  the  coat  sleeve.  In  1863  he  went  to  the  Missouri 
river  after  emigrants.  In  1880  he  was  called  on  a  two 
3^ears'  mission  to  Denmark.  He  was  for  many  years  a 
member  of  the  band.  Has  a  nice  farm  and  is  a  successful 
farmer.  AA^as  marr-ied  in  Ephraim,  Januar^^  19,  1863,  to 
Kisty,  daughter  of  Easmus  and  Caroline  I^arsen,  born  in 
Denmark,  Januaiy  21,  1847.  Her  x>arents  were  among 
the  first  settlers  of  Ephraim;  both  died  here.  She  has 
had  twelve  children,  Annie,  Caroline  L.,  Tina,  Eliza,  Vi- 
late,  Carrie,  Alonzo  and  Lavor  living;  James  R.,  Lewis, 
Hannah  D.  and  George  H.,  deceased. 

CARSEN,  OLE,  millwright,  son  of  Rasmus  and  Caro- 
line, was  born  in  Denmark,  on  the  Island  of  Falster, 
November  13,  1850.  The  famjly  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt. 
Fosgren's  company,  reaching  Ephraim  in  1853,  and  going 
to  Manti.  In  1854  they  returned  to  Ephraim,  father  as- 
sisted in  building  the  forts,  and  was  a  prominent  church- 
man, for  many  years  being  president  of  the  Quorum  of 
Seventies.  Parents  died  here  some  years  ago.  Ole 
learned  the  trade  of  a  cabinet  maker,  then  went  to  Salt 
Lake  City  and  learned  to  be  an  engineer.  Later  he  learned 
to  be  a  millwright  and  assisted  in  putting  up  most  of  the 


I 


PRESIDENT  CANUTE  PETERSON, 
EPHRAIM. 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  325 

mills  in  the  county.  He  owns  an  iutei"est  in  the  Hunting- 
ton mill  in  Emeiy  county,  which  he  put  up.  Is  a  con- 
tractor in  erectin<^-  buildings.  Took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  in  guarding  and  other  duties.  Was  married 
in  Salt  Lake  City,  April  15,  1870,  to  Annie  M.,  daughter 
of  Andrew  P.  and  Annie  Olsen,  born  in  Denmark,  Sep- 
tember 22,  1852.  They  have  four  children,  Annie  C,  wife 
of  William  H.  Bailey;  Clara  L.,  wife  of  Adelbert  Ander- 
son; Angeline,  wife  of  Charles  Jensen,  and  Marinda,  wife 
of  Andrew  T.  Bjerregaard. 

eAKSEN,  AYILLIAM  A.,  f aimer  and  woolgrower,  son 
of  Christian  A.  and  Maiw  A.  Larsen,  was  born  in 
Ephraim,  Februaiy  23,  1860.  He  was  raised  to  farm 
work  and  now  follows  farming  and  stock-raising.  Owns 
145  acres  of  land.  Attended  the  University  of  Utah  a 
short  time  and  made  a  study  of  music  for  two  years,  be- 
coming an  expe^rt  on  the  flute.  AA'as  a  member  of  the 
brass  band  fifteen  years.  Seined  as  assistant  post- 
master in  Ephraim  five  years  and  postmaster  at  Price, 
Carbon  county,  eight  months.  \A'as  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  October  28,  1880,  to  Matilda,  daughter  of  Lars  and 
Mary  A.  Anderson,  boru  in  Ephraim,  October  4,  1859. 
Her  parents  died  here,  coming  in  1856  among  the  early 
settlers,  father  being  a  representative  man.  Her  chil- 
dren are  William  A.,  Drucilla  E.,  Mary  E.,  Mary  A.  J., 
Hillary  L.,  Grace  O.  and  Vera  M.  living;  Kaphael  and 
Christian  B.,  deceased. 

eUND,  HON.  ANTHON  H.,  merchant,  son  of  Henry 
and  Ane  Christine,  was  born  at  Aalborg,  Denmark, 
May  15,  1844.  He  was  sent  to  school  at  4  years  of 
age  and  soon  learned  to  read.  The  historical  part  of  the 
Bible  had  a  special  attraction  for  him.  This  early  read- 
ing has  proved  of  incalculable  value  to  him  in  his  min- 
isteiial  labors.  At  7  years  he  entered  the  city  schools  of 
Aalborg  aud  when  hardly  12  years  old  he  had  reached  the 
foremost  place  in  the  highest  grade.  His  uncle  and 
grandmother  joined  the  Mormon  church  early  in  the  '50's, 
but  he  was  but  a  young  boy  when  he  first  came  in  con- 


326  HISTORY    01    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

tact  with  the  Saints,  but  he  became  deeply  interested  in 
their  teachings  and  was  soon  convinced  of  their  truth.  At 
13  years  of  age  he  was  sent  as  a  missionary  to  the  Aal- 
borg  conference.  At  16  he  was  appointed  to  preside  over 
the  Aalborg  brancli  and  also  a  traveling  elder.  In  the 
spring  of  1802  he  emigiated  to  Utah  in  the  company  of 
Bishop  C.  A.  Madsen.  Airiving  in  Utah,  he  spent  three 
months  in  Fairview  a^  a  farm  hand.  lie  went  next  to 
Mount  Pleasant.  John  Baiton,  one  of  the  early  settlerb 
of  that  place,  engaged  him  to  teach  his  children.  He 
lived  with  these  people  nearl}'  seven  years.  In  the  spring 
of  18G4  he  was  sent  to  the  Misscjuii  river  after  emigrants. 
Was  clerk  of  the  ccmipany  and  helped  in  guard  duties. 
When  he  i^eturned  to  Mount  Pheasant  in  the  fall  he  was 
engaged  to  teach  school.  Th('  next  spring  he  was  en- 
gaged as  clerk  in  >\'ilUam  .leuning's  store  in  Mount 
Pleasant.  In  the  winter  of  18GG,  when  the  building  of 
the  Deseit't  teh'giai)h  line  was  contem])lated,  President 
Young  called  a  immbci'  of  young  men  to  learn  telegiapliy 
and  he  was  chosen.  ( >n  liis  return  to  Mount  Pleasant  he 
built  a  telegraph  oltice  and  ])hotogTapliic  gallery,  and 
when  the  Deseiet  telegia])!!  line  was  extcuded  through 
the  southern  settlements  he  took  the  position  of  operator 
and  also  engaged  in  the  business  of  photography.  In  the 
fall  of  1870  he  moved  to  Ephraim,  having  maiTied  the 
daughter  of  Bishop  Peterson,  and  has  resided  here  ever 
since.  A^'hen  the  Co-op.  store  was  established  he  was 
elected  a  director  and  appointed  secretary.  W^as  also 
elected  a,  member  of  the  first  City  Council.  In  the  spring 
of  1871  he  accompanied  his  father-in-law  on  a  mission 
to  Scandinavia  and  was  appointed  business  manager  of 
the  mission.  In  1873  he  accepted  a  position  in  the  Eph- 
raim Co-op.  store  and  became  its  manager,  which  posi- 
tion he  held  until  1883,  when  he  was  again  called  to  go 
to  Scandinavia  on  a  mission.  Under  his  management  the 
store  had  become  one  of  the  leading  stores  of  the  county, 
and  for  years  the  shareholders  received  a  dividend  of  25 
per  cent.  In  1874  he  was  chosen  a  member  of  the  High 
Council,  and  when  the  Sanpete  stake  was  orga-nized  in 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  327 

1877  he  was  chosen  to  be  a  member  of  the  new  High 
Council  and  also  appointed  clerk  of  the  Sanpete  stake. 
In  1883  he  went  to  Scandinavia  as  president  of  that  mis- 
sion. He  edited  two  papers  in  Danish  and  one  in  Swed- 
ish, and  attended  to  a  large  emigration  business.  He  re- 
turned in  the  fall  of  1885  and  was  elected  a  member  of 
the  Territorial  Legislature,  re-elected  in  1887.  Among 
the  bills  he  introduced,  which  Atere  passed,  were  the  bills 
for  the  founding  of  the  Reform  School  and  the  Agricul- 
tural College.  In  188()  he  accepted  the  position  as  agent 
for  Z.  C.  M.  I.  in  Sanpete  and  Sevier  counties,  and  held 
it  until  May,  1888,  when  he  was  appointed  vice-pi'esident 
of  the  ^Nlanti  Temple  and  a  member  of  the  Church  Board 
of  Education.  In  1889  he  was  sustained  as  one  of  the 
Twelve  Apostles.  On  the  death  of  President  D.  H.  Wells 
in  1891  he  succeeded  him  in  the  presidency  of  the  jNIanti 
Temple.  In  1893  he  received  the  appointment  of  presi- 
dent of  the  European  mission  and  occupied  this  position 
over  three  years.  His  knowledge  of  several  of  the  Euro- 
pean languages  was  a  great  help  to  him  in  that  position. 
In  1897  he  was  elected  a  director  of  the  Z.  C.  M.  I.,  and 
in  December  of  the  same  year  he  was  sent  on  a  special 
mission  to  Turkey.  He  organized  branches  of  the  church 
at  Aintab  and  Aleppo,  and  visited  Jerusalem  and  the 
Holy  Land.  He  returned  in  June,  1898.  During  the  last 
ten  yeare  he  has  carried  on  a  successful  business  in  stoves 
and  fumitui'e.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  interest 
in  public  affairs,  especially  in  the  improvement  of 
schools.  He  held  the  position  of  school  trustee  for  many 
years  and  as  superintendent  of  the  North  Ward  Sunday- 
school.  His  wife  was  Sarah  A.,  daughter  of  Canute  and 
Sarah  A.  Peterson,  born  in  I^hi,  January  4,  1853.  They 
were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  May  2,  1870,  and  have 
had  nine  children,  Anthony  C,  who  has  received  a  musi- 
cal education  in  Gennany,  has  had  charge  of  the  musical 
department  of  B.  Y.  academy  the  last  three  years,  and 
was  the  youngest  member  of  the  Constitutional  State 
convention;  Henry  C,  taking  a  law  course  in  the  Michi- 
gan University;  Bay,  teacher  in  Ephraim  schools;  Oth- 


328  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

niel,  August  William,  (ieorge  C.  aud  Eva,  at  home;  Sar<ah 
H.  and  (Jauute,  deceased. 

CUND,  THOMAS  P.,  manufacturer  of  lumber,  son  of 
Peter  and  Marj^  A.,  was  born  in  Denmark,  August 
6,  1857.  He  came  with  his  parents  to  Utah  in  'G8, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train  and  located  at  Eph- 
raim.  Worked  on  a  farm  and  in  the  canyon  getting  out 
lumber  till  '87,  when  he  purchased  a  sawmill,  thirteen 
miles  east  of  Ephraim,  which  he  still  owns,  employing 
twelve  to  fifteen  men  and  cutting  about  300,000  feet  of 
lumber  annually.  Also  own's  100  acres  of  land  and  is 
engaged  in  stockraising.  He  served  in  the  Black  Hawk 
Avar  at  guarding  and  herding  stock.  AVas  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City,  May  20,  1880,  to  Can-ie  C,  daughter  of  Soren 
and  Elsie  M.  Olsen.  They  have  six  children:  Elsie  M., 
Tressie,  Thomas  L.,  Alma  C,  Eva  S.  and  Carrie  E, 

rr\  ADSEX,  JENS  C,  retired  farmer,  son  of  Christian 
ill  and  Anna  K.,  was  born  iji  Denmark,  December  3, 
'  ^  1821.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  and  came  to 
Utah  in  '03,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Saunder's  com- 
pany, and  reaching  Ephraim  on  October  12th.  When  he 
arrived  he  had  5  cents  in  cash,  with  a  wife  and  four  chil- 
dren depending  on  him.  Soon  purchased  a  small  farm 
and  cultiv^ated  it  until  he  retired  on  account  of  age.  Took 
part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and  did  his  share  of  the 
duties.  Was  married  in  Denmark  to  Anna  K.  Jacobsen. 
They  have  had  four  children:  Christian,  Johanna  and 
Anna  K.,  married  and  living  in  Utah;  one  child,  Ger- 
trude, deceased. 

fY\  ADSEN,  MADS  PETEK,  farmer,  son  of  Peter  and 
I  I  I  Ellen,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  March  25,  1856.  He 
^  ^  is  the  second  oldest  male  child  born  in  Ephraim, 
noM'  a  resident.  Owns  twenty-fiA^e  acres  of  land  and  fol- 
loAvs  farming.  Served  as  Justice  of  the  Peace  one  term. 
In  October,  1884,  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Den- 
V  ark.  Is  a  member  of  the  Quorum  of  Seventies  and  has 
always  taken  an  actiAe  interest  in  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A., 
haAing  been  counsellor  to  the  pi-esident.     He  worked 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  329 

several  months  in  the  Manti  and  St.  George  temples. 
Diiiing  the  Black  Hawk  war  was  shot  in  the  back  by 
an  arrow  while  playing  outside  the  fort.  Was  married 
in  Salt  Lake  City,  June  26,  1876,  to  Josephine,  daughter 
of  Ole  and  Annie  Johnson  Olsen,  born  in  Christiania, 
October  24,  1858.  They  have  eight  children:  Peter  F., 
Orson,  Hyrum  B.,  Ellen,  Clifford  L.,  Charles  H.,  Katie  J., 
Edith  L.  and  Thelma. 

nrv  ADSEN,  NEILS  J.,  of  Mad  sen  Bros.  &  Co.,  manu- 
1  I  I  facturers  of  lumber,  son  of  Peter  and  Ellen,  was 
'  y  born  in  Ephraim  July  19,  1859.  He  was  brought 
up  to  farm  work,  but  engaged  in  lumbering  when  he  be- 
came a  man.  In  '87  he  and  brother  David  built  a  mill  in 
Cottonwood  canyon,  run  by  water  power,  w^here  they 
made  lumber.  In  '91  they  put  in  steam  power  and  opened 
the  first  steam  planing  mill  in  Ephraim.  They  admitted 
A.  C.  Andersoii  in  '97,  thus  forming  the  present  company. 
Neils  is  also  interested  in  wool  growing.  His  wife  was 
Viola,  daughter  of  John  and  Caroline  Pratt  Van  Cott, 
born  in  Salt  Lake  City  June  19, 18G0.  They  were  married 
in  Salt  Lake  City  July  8,  1880,  and  have  seven  children: 
Maggie,  Ruby,  Josepli,  Ynn  Le  Boy,  Hai'old,  Bay  and 
Harvey. 

fY\  ADSEN,  PETEB,  letired  farmer,  carpenter  and 
/  1  I  wheehvright,  son  of  iVIads  and  Anna,  was  born  on 
/  I  the  island  of  Sjelland  October  11,  1818.  He 
learned  the  trade  of  a  wheelwright,  was  baptized  into  the 
Mormon  church  December  29,  1851,  and  came  to  Utah  in 
1853,  crossing  the  plains  in  John  Fosgren's  company.  He 
located  in  Spring  City,  where  he  soon  left  on  account  of 
Indians,  going  to  Manti,  and  in  1851  coming  to  Ephraim^ 
where  he  assisted  in  building  the  fort.  He  endured  all 
the  hardships  and  privations  of  early  days  and  took  part 
in  the  Indian  troubles.  For  many  years  he  had  a  shop 
near  by  his  residence  and  worked  at  his  trade  and  doing 
carpentering.  Had  a  farm  which  he  worked  till  six  years 
ago,  when  he  retired  because  of  age.    Was  city  treasurer 


330  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

for  two  years,  and  has  always  been  quite  active  and 
prominent  in  public  matteirs.  His  first  wife,  whom  he 
married  May  9,  1852,  was  Ellen  Nielson.  She  died  in 
Ephraim  January  15,  1884,  leaving  four  children:  Mads 
P.,  Ellen  C.  and  Joseph,  ]i\ing  and  married;  Josepliine, 
deceased.  Second  wife  was  Maria  O.  Thompson.  She  has 
three  children:  David  P.,  Ezra  S.  and  Daniel  F.,  all 
living  in  Ephraim. 

rj^  ORTENSEN,  NEILS  Is'.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son 
J  1  I  ^'^  Jens  and  Aunii.  0.,  was  born  in  Denmark  Sep- 
I  I  tember  10,  1837.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church 
in  1803  and  emigrated  in  1864,  passing  through  Germany 
to  England  to  evade  being  pressed  into  service  in  the 
army.  Himself  and  wife  with  two  children  reached 
Epliraiin  in  September,  1804,  having  crossed  the  plains 
in  Captain  John  Smith's  company.  Purchased  a  farm 
and  now  ]\;\^  5(K»  acres  of  land,  l>eing  one  of  the  largest 
farmer's  in  Ephraim.  He  went  on  a  mission  in  1886  to 
the  Northern  States.  Was  married  in  Denmark  in  1861 
to  Christina  Jensen.  She  died  June  1,  1883,  leaving  ten 
children:  Anna  C,  George,  Matilda,  Neils,  Petreana  C, 
Mortena  and  Josephina,  living;  Josephine  C,  Heber  and 
George  A.,  deceased. 

rr\  URRAY,  M.  F.,  born  in  Philadelphia,  Penn.,  De- 
I  \\  <ember  12,  1802.  Family  moved  to  Osage,  Iowa, 
'  y  in  1800,  and  from  there  moved  to  Le  Roy,  JMinn., 
in  1875.  He  received  his  education  in  public  schools  of 
Le  Roy.  Learned  the  printing  business  in  the  office  of 
the  I^  Roy  Independent.  In  1889  moved  to  South  Sioux 
City,  Nebraska,  and  Avas  for  two  years  foreman  and  city 
editor  of  South  Sioux  City  Times.  Came  to  Utah  in 
search  of  better  health  in  1891,  in  which  year  he  estab- 
lished the  Ephraim  Enterprise,  which  he  has  conducted 
ever  since.  Is  a  Democrat  and  has  taken  an  active  part 
in  county  and  State  politics.  Is  at  present  chairman  of 
the  Democratic  County  Committee.  Was  elected  County 
Clerk  in  1890. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  331 

KTeILSEN,  CHEISTIAN,  deceased,  son  of  Soren  and 
li  Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark,  February  12,  1810. 
'  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to  Utah, 
c.cssing-  the  plains  in  Capt.  Olsen's  company,  reaching 
Ephraim  in  November,  1854.  In  '65  he  went  to  assist  in 
settling  Circle  Valley,  but  had  to  return  in  one  year  on 
account  of  Indians,  losing  about  all  he  had.  Engaged  in 
farming  and  followed  it  till  his  death,  September  16,  1889. 
Was  married  in  Denmark,  his  wife  dying  while  en  route 
to  Utah,  leaving  two  children.  Mar}'  and  Annie  K.  Mar- 
j'ied  again  in  Ephraim,  Januaiy  9,  1855,  to  Karen,  daugh- 
ter of  Peter  and  Johanna  Hansen,  born  in  Denmark,  De- 
cember 12,  1835.  She  had  seven  children:  Caroline,  wife 
of  N.  P.  Neilsen;  Margaret,  wife  of  Bishop  C.  E.  Dorius; 
Christian  P.,  Thomas  F.  and  Hannah  E.,  wife  of  Eph- 
raim Peterson,  living;  Hans  C.  and  Mary  J.,  deceased. 

Kj  EILSEX,  XEILS  P.,  fanner  and  quarryman,  son  of 
I  1  Peter  and  Kersten  Anderson,  Avas  born  on  the  isl- 
'  and  of  Falster,  Denmark,  February  13,  1817.  His 
mother  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  1858,  and  he  and 
father  in  1862,  when  the  family  came  to  Utah,  crossing 
the  plains  in  an  ox  train  iu  Capt.  Horn's  company. 
Father  died  while  en  route,  on  the  Sweetwater.  The  fam- 
ily reached  Ephraim  in  November,  1862.  Neils  P.  assist- 
ed in  quaiiwing  stone  for  the  fort  and  stood  guard  during 
the  Black  Hawk  war.  He  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
December  15,  1868,  to  Caroline,  daughter  of  Christen  and 
Anna  M.  Christensen,  born  in  Hjoiing  Amt.  Jyland,  Sep- 
tember 5,  1848.  They  have  had  thirteen  children:  Heber 
P.,  teacher  in  the  Ephraim  public  schools  and  proprietor 
of  the  Arcade  Book-store;  Hans  F.,  proprietor  Centre 
Street  Meat  Market;  David  W.,  Abel  C.,  Aurelia  C,  Aaron 
(jr.,  Moses  M.,  Anna  A.,  Matilda  C,  Ernest  H.  and  Joseph 
E.,  living;  Neils  P.  and  an  infant,  deceased.  When  the 
land  was  divided  he  received  five  acres,  and  now  has  a 
nice  farm  of  iif  ty  acres.  Is  a  small  wool  grower  and  was 
a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store.  He  has  always  been 
an  active  worker  in  church  and  Sunday-school,  and  never 
!•  issed  attending  Sunday-school  in  twenty-five  years. 
Seiwed  as  assistant  superintendent  and  was  counsellor 


332  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

I 

tr  the  president  of  the  Elder's  quorum.  Is  at  present  a 
raember  of  the  Forty-seventh  Quorum  of  Seventies.  In 
the  spring  of  1893  he  went  on  a  mission  to  his  native 
land  and  had  charge  of  the  Island  Branch  of  the  Copen- 
hagen conference  for  two  years.  He  returned  to  the  Mis- 
souri river  in  1868  with  Bishop  Seely's  company  for  emi- 
grants, and  was  with  the  company  when  six  men  were 
drowned  at  Eobinson's  Ferry  on  Green  River.  His  sec- 
ond wife  was  Caroline  Xielson,  by  whom  he  has  two 
children:  Jane  and  Irene.  He  is  a  prominent  and  repre- 
sentative man,  liaving  tlie  esteem  of  the  entire  city. 

M  EILSON,  A.  C,  mason  and  plastei*er,  son  of  Andrew 
1)1  C.  and  Mary  C,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  December 
i  23,  1870.  The  family  came  from  Denmark  in  '64 
and  located  in  Ephraim.  In  '80  they  removed  to  a  farm 
three  miles  southwest  of  town.  A.  C.  was  raised  here 
and  learned  the  trade  of  a  mason  and  plasterer,  and  has 
followed  it  seven  years.  Is  a  member  of  the  Mormon 
church  and  an  active  worker  in  the  Sunday-school.  Was 
married  in  Manti  temple,  February  28,  1894,  to  Julia, 
daughter  of  C.  C.  A.  and  Mary  Christensen,  born  in  Eph- 
raim, December  5,  1871.  They  have  two  children:  Eva 
J.,  born  Januaiw  5,  1896,  and  Andrew  C,  born  Mai^ch  4, 
1898. 

ji^IELSON,  MONS,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of  Niels 
1)1  and  Ellen,  was  born  in  Sweden,  December  19,  1834. 
I  He  s])ent  seven  years  as  fireman  on  railroad;  joined 
the  Mormon  church  in  '60,  came  to  Utah  in  '62,  crossing 
the  plains  in  Capt.  Van  Cott'a  ox  train,  and  located  in 
Ephraim.  In  '64  he  removed  to  Circle  Valley,  to  assist 
the  settlers,  but  had  to  return  in  '66  on  account  of  In- 
dians. Was  active  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in 
several  skirmishes  with  Indians.  In  '79  he  went  on  a 
two  years'  mission  to  Sweden.  Is  now  a  counsellor 
to  the  bishop.  Has  a  nice  farm  of  seventy  acres 
and  2,600  sheep.  Was  married  in  '62,  to  Maria 
Pehrson  of  Sweden.  She  had  no  children.  Married  again 
November  10,  1866,  in  Ephraim,  to  Johanna,  daughter 
T  f  Jens  and  Hannah  Jensen,  born  in  Sweden,  March  28, 


HOX.    ANTHON    H.    I.UND, 
jOPHRAIM. 


HISTORi'    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  333 

1S49.  Her  children  are:  Hilda,  Hannah,  Joseph,  Frank- 
lin, Amelia,  Martin,  Almah  and  Hazel,  living;  Batilda, 
Xeils  D.,  Alvin  H.  and  Betsey  E.,  deceased.  Third  wife 
Avas  Betsey  Xeilson,  who  had  two  children:  Benjamin, 
living',  and  Jolm,  deceased.  Fourth  wife  was  Annetta 
Tiilberg.     She  has  no  children. 

|y/  lELSOX,  SOREX,  deceased,  was  bom  in  Ohristiania, 
1)1  Norway,  about  1840.  He  spent  many  years  in  quar- 
I  ryiug  stone  and  the  liver^^  business.  In  1853  he  emi- 
grated to  Utah,  i^-acldng  Ephraim  in  '56  and  locating. 
Was  engaged  many  years  in  farming  and  freighting  pro- 
duce to  thf  uiiniug  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada,  then  went 
into  the  mercantile  business.  Took  an  active  i:>art  in  the 
Jilack  llawlc  war,  standing  guard  and  other  dtities,  and 
lost  many  head  of  cattle  by  Indian  depredations.  He  was 
a  very  successful  business  man  and  accumulated  consid- 
erable money,  which  he  loaned  during  the  last  few  years. 
He  died  in  Ephraim  October  19,  1893.  Was  married  first 
in  Norway  to  Maria  C.  Brunn,  who  had  one  child:  Mary 
C.  Second  wife  was  Maria  Dennison,  who  had  one  child: 
Sorina.  She  was  married  pi^viously  to  Niels  Ericksen, 
haA'ing  two  living  children :    (.'aroline  and  Mads  N. 

OLSEN,  SOKEN  A.,  farmer,  sou  of  Andrew  P.  and 
Elizabeth,  was  bom  in  Denmark  August  30,  1852. 
In  1862  he  came  to  Utah  with  his  grandfather, 
crof^sing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  with  Captain  Soren 
Christofferson,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  Parents  came 
later.  During  the  Black  Hawk  war  he  stood  gtiard  and 
herded  stock.  Was  raised  to  farm  work  and  freighted 
produce  to  the  miniug  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada.  He 
secured  a  farm,  now  owns  150  acres  and  is  a  very  success- 
ful farmer  and  stockraiser,  having  200  head  of  cattle. 
Was  maniecl  in  Salt  Lake  City  to  Trena  Olsen.  She  had 
seven  children:  Ohi-istian,  ^Martin,  Osman,  Marinda, 
Irrin  and  Katie,  living;  and  Erastus,  deceased.  Wife 
died  and  he  married  again  in  Logan  October  12,  1887,  to 

Emma,  daughter  of  Hans  and  I^na  Neilsen,  born  in  Den- 
11 


334  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

mark  February  2,  1861.  Slie  has  had  seven  children: 
Delia,  Elvena,  Orson,  Elvina.,  Emroy  a.nd  Dosena,  living; 
Lena,  deceased. 

OI^SON,  OLE,  traveling  salesman  for  Gonsolidated  Im- 
plement Company,  was  borni  in  Denmark  June  6, 
1802.  His  parents  came  from  Denmark,  crossing 
the  plains  by  ox-train  in  1866  or  7.  Father  is  living; 
mother  dead.  He  w  as  raised  on  a  fai'm  and  engaged  in 
farming  and  stockraising,  now  owning  about  100  acres 
of  land  and  a  residence  in  the  city.  In  1889  he  began 
selling  agricultural  imi:)lements  for  D.  M.  Osborne  and 
the  Studebaker  Company;  was  with  them  six  years,  and 
engaged  in  his  present  work,  being  very  successful  and 
liaving  cliargf  of  San])et<'  county.  He  also  owns  a  one- 
fouii:!!  interest  in  tlie  Junction  Co-op  store,  Avhich  carries 
about  115,000  stock  of  general  merchandise.  Served  as 
Justice  of  the  Peace  for  several  years.  His  wife  was 
Emma,  daughter  of  Niels  and  Catherine  Christiansen, 
born  in  Salt  Lake  City  June  17,  1859.  They  Avere  manned 
in  Salt  Lake  City  April  24,  1884,  and  have  four  children: 
Ole  AA'.,  Emma  K.,  Joseph  E.  and  Anna,  D. 

OITEKSTKOM,  JOHN  IL,  fanner  and  dealer  in  grain 
and  stock,  sou  of  Jonas  and  Maiy'  K.  Johansen,  was 
born  in  Christiania,  Norway,  March  24,  1850.  The 
family  came  to  Utah  in  1856,  crossing  the  plains  in  Can- 
ute Petei'son's  train,  and  located  in  Ephraim.  They  lived 
in  the  fort  several  years,  father  being  a  blacksmith  and 
an  active  worker  in  the  church,  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  and  died  in  April,  1884.  Mother  died  Septem- 
ber 2,  1897.  John  was  raised  here  and  learned  the  black- 
smithing  trade  of  his  father.  He  worked  in  the  canyon 
at  fanning  and  freighting  and  then  went  to  bu^dng  and 
shipping  grain.  Oavus  a  farm  and  has  a  gXDod  residence 
in  the  city.  SerAed  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council.  Was 
married  in  Salt  Lake  City  March  9,  1874,  to  Nicolina, 
daughter  of  Soren  and  Elsie  M.  Olseai,  born  in  Denmark 
August  11,  1854.     They  have  had  seven  children:    John 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  335 

H.,  Joseph  F.,  Alice,  Oscair  and  Neomi,  living;  Charles 
W.  and  Mahonroy,  deceased. 

PAUL8EX,  PAUL,  fanner,  son  of  Lars  and  Caroline, 
was  born  in  Denmark,  July  24,  1845.  In  the  fall  of 
'53  the  family  left  for  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in 
Capt.  Olsen's  ox  train  company,  reaching  Ephraim  in  Oc- 
tober, 1854,  being  one  year  on  the  way.  They  assisted 
in  building  the  outside  fort,  father  quarrying  the  rock 
and  mother  driving  team  in  hauling.  Father  died  in  '84, 
mother  still  living,  77  years  of  age.  Paul  took  part  in 
the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in  the  Salina  canj^on  and 
Grass  Valley  engagements.  He  purchased  a  small  farm 
and  now  has  ninety  acres.  In  '63  he  w^ent  to  the  Missouri 
river  after  emigrants.  In  '97  he  went  on  a  mission  to  Den- 
mark, but  had  to  return  on  account  of  sickness.  Was 
married  in  Ephraim,  March  20,  1866,  to  Anna  C.  Overson. 
She  had  five  children:  George  P.,  Heber,  John  E.,  David 
and  Annie  C,  and  died  October  13,  1884.  Married  again 
in  Xovember,  1885,  to  Annie  S.  Jorgensen.  She  has  one 
child:  Annetta. 

PETEESEN,  NIELS,  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Eph- 
raim, son  of  Peter  and  Sena  Xeilson,  was  bom  in 
Denmark,  October  29,  1814.  He  started  for  Utah 
in  '52,  crossed  the  plains  in  Capt.  Fosgren's  company,  and 
reached  Spring  City  in  October,  1853.  Went  to  Manti  for 
the  winter  and  in  the  spring  of  '54  came  to  Ephraim. 
Assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  The  land  was  apportioned  and  he  received 
twenty  acres,  which  he  fanned  successfully  and  raised 
stock.  Was  recognized  as  a  good,  solid  and  substantial 
farmer.  He  died  in  Ephraim,  March  28,  1897.  Was  mar- 
ried on  the  plains  to  Maiw,  daughter  of  Jens  and  Kirsty 
Jensen,  born  in  Denmark,  December  20,  1830.  They  had 
nine  children;  five  still  living  in  Sanpete.  Jens  P.,  Chris- 
tina wife  of  Daniel  B.  Funk;  Annie  E.,  wife  of  Charles 
Whitlock,  Jr. ;  Maria,  wife  of  Peter  Thompson,  and  Eph- 
raim, born  March  29,  1868;  married  to  Hannah  E.,  daugh- 
ter of  Christian  and  Karen  Nielson,  bom  in  EphraiBi)  Sep- 
tember 14,  1872. 


336  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

PETERSEN,  PETEE  T.,  fai-mer,  sou  of  Jens  T.  and 
Caroline,  was  born  in  Denmark,  on  the  island  of 
Falster,  October  25,  ISil.  The  family  joined  the 
Mormon  church  and  came  tO'  Utah  in  1854,  crossing  the 
plains  in  Captain  Guvman's  company  of  ox-teams,  and 
located  in  Ephraim  in  September,  1855.  Thej  assisted 
in  building  the  fort  and  lived  inside  it  three  years.  Father 
died  here  March  10,  1877,  mother  December  2,  1891.  Peter 
has  always  followed  farming,  now  owns  100  acres  of 
land.  In  1801  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emi- 
grants. Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  a  min- 
utemaii  and  being  in  the  saddle  a  great  deal.  M'siS  mar- 
ried in  E])hrj)iui  Fcbruaiy  22,  1877,  to  Helga,  daughter 
of  Christian  and  Cliristina  Schagaard,  born  in  Norway 
July  18,  1853.  They  have  had  six  children:  Melvina  A., 
Alice  C.  A.,  Oscar  C.  and  Dagness  O.,  living;  Peter  J.  J. 
and  IMaggie  C,  deceased.    Wife  died  October  20,  1884. 

PETERSON,  PRESIDENT  CANUTE,  son  of  Peter 
Johnson  and  ITerborg  Peterson,  was  born  in  Eidf- 
jord,  Ilardanger,  Norway,  May  13,  1824.  His  pa- 
i"en1s  canu*  to  the  riiitcd  States  when  he  was  twelve  and 
located  in  La  Salle  county.  111.,  where  they  died.  Father 
died  in  1838,  motliei-  in  1848.  The  parents  were  poor  and 
had  borrowed  JS>400  to  pay  their  emigration,  Avhich  was 
paid  in  full  by  Canute  before  he  was  nineteen  years  old. 
He  had  no  o])i)oituuities  for  attending  school,  hence  is 
a  self-made  man.  He  followed  teaming  in  the  summer 
and  threshing  during  the  winters.  August  12,  1842,  he 
joined  tliie  church  and  in  1849  came  to  Utah,  crossing 
the  idains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capts.  Heniy  Ericksen 
Selbe  and  Ezra  T.  Benson.  He  was  married  at  Kanes- 
ville  July  4,  1849,  to  Sarah  Ann  Nelson.  When  they 
reached  the  Elk  Horn  river  he  and  another  man  swam 
the  stream  to  get  the  feiTyboat,  which  was  used  in  cross- 
ing. The  company  arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City  October 
25th,  where  he  located.  He  was  called  to  Lehi  and  re- 
moved there  March  18,  1851,  and  later  was  married  to 
Gertrude  Mamie  Rolfson  and  Charlotte  Ekstrom.  In 
1852  he  was  called  on  a  four  3  ears'  mission  to  Noi'way. 


HISTOEY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  337 

returnint;'  iu  1850  with  a  company  of  400  Saints,  ou  board 
the  ship  "John  J.  Bovd."  Iu  1807  he  was  called  to 
Ephraim  to  preside  as  bishop.  He  made  a  treaty  of  jieace 
witli  the  Indians  in  1808  and  that  treaty  has  neyer  been 
broken.  He  was  called  to  perform  a,  second  mission  in 
1871  and  presided  over  the  Scandinayian  mission  for  two 
years.  When  he  returned  he  brou<»lit  a  comimny  of  1)00 
Saints.  July  5,  1877,  he  was  ordained  president  of  San- 
pete stake,  which  position  he  now  holds  Avith  perfect  sat- 
isfaction to  the  pe()])le.  He  Ayas  also  assistant  supeiin- 
tendent  of  the  Manti  temple  and  laid  the  northwest  cor- 
nerstone. While  a  resident  of  Lehi  he  seryed  as  a  .mem- 
ber of  the  City  (V)nncil  and  Ayas  a  bishop's  counselor. 
Has  serA'ed  as  a  member  of  the  Ephraim  City  Coun«nl 
and  Ayas  a  member  of  the  Le^iislature  three  terms.  He 
Avas  oi'dained  a,  imtidarch  by  President  Georoe  Q.  Oaunou 
May  15,  1892.  He  is  the  father  of  tAyenty-cme  children 
and  has  sixty-nine  oraudchildren  and  three  great  gran^l- 
cliildren.     His  wife,  Sarah,  died  May  20,  1800. 


PETEKSOX, 'CANUTE  W.,  son  of  Canute  and  Sarah 
A.,  was  born  in  Lehi,  Utah,  September  5,  1859.  The 
family  removed  to  Ephraim  when  he  AA^as  a  boy.  He 
attended  the  public  schools  and  took  a  normal  course  in 
the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Proyo,  where  he  graduated.  Taught 
school  in  Ephraim  seA^eral  years.  Went  on  a  mission  iu 
'85,  laboring  nearly  two  years  in  Minnesota,  Wisconsin, 
Illinois  and  loAva.  Was  elected  County  Assessor  in  '88 
and  held  the  office  eight  years.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the 
Junction  Co-op  and  the  Climax  Roller  Mill.  Was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council,  elected  in  '95.  A  member  of  the 
High  Council,  haying  sensed  as  secretarA^  He  went  on 
a  second  mission  to  Norway  in  June,  1897,  presiding  oyer 
the  Christiania  branch.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
July  22,  1880,  to  Hilda,  daughter  of  Paul  and  Elna  Wal- 
demar  Dehlm,  born  in  Sweden,  September  11,  1857.  They 
have  tiA'e  children:  Hilda  E.,  Daisy  B.,  Canute,  Paul  and 
Antone. 


838  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

PETERSON,  HANS  P.,  fanner,  was  born  in  Denmark, 
April  15,  1839.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and  at 
the  age  of  22  entered  the  army,  serving  in  the  cav- 
alry two  years  during  the  war  with  Germany.  Joined 
tJie  Mormon  church  in  '68,  and  in  '71  came  to  Utah,  lo- 
cated in  Ephraim  and  engaged  in  farming.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Denmark,  March  17,  1865,  to  Ann  McGrader,  They 
have  had  nine  children:  Nels  P.,  Carl  E.,  Louis  F.  and 
Hansina  C,  living;  Jens  Christian  August,  Joseph  John, 
Hans  Peter,  Maria  and  one  not  named,  deceased. 

PETERSON,  JENS  P.,  fanner  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Niels  and  Maiy  Jensen,  was  born  in  Ephram,  Feb- 
ruary- 13,  1855.  He  is  probably  the  oldest  male 
cl>ild  now  living  in  Ephraim,  who  was  born  here.  The 
family  came  here  in  the  spring  of  '54  with  the  first  set- 
tlers. When  Jens  was  13  he  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
w  ar,  standing  guard  and  doing  other  duties.  Was  raised 
on  a  farm,  Avorked  in  a  sawmill  several  years,  then  pur- 
chased a  farm  and  has  a  number  of  cattle.  Was  married 
in  Spring  City,  Novoiiiber  12,  1877,  to  Martina,  daughter 
of  Andrew  P.  and  Annie  Mortensen  Olson,  born  in  Den- 
mark, November  4,  1857.  They  have  had  nine  children: 
Electa,  Nels  O.,  Zenobia,  Hazel,  Alonzo,  Sana  and  Kay 
L.,  living;  Elesta  and  James  E.,  deceased, 

PETERSON,  LEHI,  dealer  in  cattle  and  sheep  and 
wool  grower,  son  of  Canute  and  Gertrude  M.  Rolf- 
son,  ^^'as  born  in  Lehi,  Utah,  October  25,  1858.  The 
family  removed  to  Ephraim  when  he  was  9  yeai'S  old;  he 
grew  up  on  the  farm  and  engaged  in  the  stock  business. 
He  bought  for  N.  S.  Neilson  of  Mt.  Pleasant  for  several 
years,  and  in  1897  bought  for  Keat  &  Lewis  of  Nephi. 
AVas  man-ied  in  Salt  Lake  City,  October  11,  1878,  to  Caro- 
line, daughter  of  Andrew  and  Caroline  Overlade,  born  in 
Ephraim,  November  17,  1859.  Her  parents  were  among 
the  early  settlers  of  Ephraim,  father  being  a  carpenter 
and  cabinet-maker,  assisting  in  building  the  Tabernacle 
and  organ.  He  died  in  Ephraim,  mother  still  living,  75 
years  of  age.  Lehi's  children  are:  Cordelia,  Lehi,  Merle, 
Josephine,  Sarah  B.  and  Andrew,  living;  Carrie,  de- 
ceased. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  339 

P  PETERSON,  NELS,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  sou  of  Ca- 
nute and  Sarah  A.,  was  born  in  Lehi,  Utah,  January 
26,  1861.  The  family  came  to  Ephraim  when  Nels 
was  about  6  years  old.  He  was  raised  to  farm  work  and 
took  charge  of  the  home  farm  until  1880,  when  he  en- 
gaged in  the  stock  business.  Owns  about  fifty  head, 
mostly  Durham,  and  has  100  acres  of  laud.  Is  engaged 
in  farming,  stockraising  and  woolgrowing.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City,  ]\Iay  29,  1884,  to  Martina  C,  daugh- 
ter of  Peter  C.  Jensen,  born  in  Circle  Valley,  Utah.  They 
have  had  one  child,  Peter  N.,  deceased. 

PETEPSON,  NEILS  L.,  usually  known  as  Lead  Pencil 
Peterson,  was  born  in  Sweden,  November  14,  1820. 
He  worked  for  two  years  as  superintendent  of  a 
factory,  making  stove  polish;  joined  the  Mormon  church 
in  '52,  was  traveling  elder  one  year,  and  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  P.  O.  Hansen's  company, 
reaching  Salt  Lake  City,  September  7,  1855.  Lived  in 
Salt  Lake,  Spanish  Fork  and  Moroni,  where  he  built  a 
heme.  In  '03  was  called  to  assist  the  settlers  in  Marys- 
vale,  where  he  took  up  land  and  built  a  home,  but  was 
compelled  to  leave  in  '(50  on  account  of  the  Indians,  when 
he  came  to  Ephraim.  He  engaged  in  fanning  and  con- 
tinues in  that  business.  Was  married  in  Moroni  to  Chris- 
tina Neilsen.  She  died  in  Ephraim,  and  he  married 
again,  October  11,  1878,  to  Martha,  daughter  of  Ole  C. 
and  Annie  Olsen,  born  in  Denmark,  June  5,  1856.  They 
have  had  five  children:  Hannah  C,  Carrie  N.,  Ellen  O. 
and  Niels  L.,  living;  Mary  A.,  deceased. 

PETEPSON,  NEILS  L.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  was 
born  in  Di^nmark,  October  8,  1857.  He  was  raised 
on  a  farm  and  came  to  Utah  in  '73,  locating  in  Eph- 
raim. Arrived  here  with  no  capital  and  went  to  freight- 
ing produce  to  the  mining  camps;  was  soon  able  to  pur- 
chase a  farm  and  engage  in  stockraising.  Now  owns  a 
farm,  seventy-five  head  of  cattle  and  800  sheep.  Was 
married  October  8,  1880,  to  Jensina  J.,  daughter  of  John 
C.  and  Amasena  Jensen.  They  had  three  children:  Clar- 
ence, Gilbert  and  Phenor.     Wife  died  March  17,  1891. 


340  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Married  again  March  25,  1897,  to  Mary  C.  Stevens,  nee 
Olsen,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Johanna,  born  in  Sweden, 
October  3,  1862.    She  has  one  child,  an  infant. 

PETERSON,  PETER,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
Peter  and  Anna,  was  born  in  Stubbelvjobing,  on  the 
island  of  I'alster,  Denmark,  October  14,  1844.  He 
was  raised  on  a  farm  and  joined  the  Mor-mon  church  in 
1862.  In  1864  he  and  brother  Hans  came  to  Utah,  he 
driving  an  ox-team  across  the  plains  for  a  Salt  Lake  com- 
pany. He  stopped  in  Manti  for  the  winter  and  came  to 
Ephraim  in  the  spring  of  1865.  Has  been  engaged  in 
farming  and  slieei)raising.  Owns  100  acres  of  farming 
besides  other  dry  land  and  a  nice  home  in  the  city. 
SerA  ed  as  City  Marshal  two  terms  and  was  a  member  of 
the  Cit}^  Council  two  terms.  Took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  Is  a  member  of  the  high  council  of  Sanpete 
Stake.  Was  maiTied  in  Ephraim  November  4,  1865,  to 
Mary  Thompson,  widow  of  David.  She  had  three  living 
cliildren:  Louisa,  David  W.,  and  Caroline  and  Diantha 
and  Elizabteli  ^\.,  deceased,  by  her  tinst  husband.  She 
has  had  six  children  since  mariying  Peterson:  Orval, 
Lorinda  and  Sarah,  living;  Peter,  Hannah  and  Dorothy 
A.,  deceased. 

PETERSON,  THOMAS  P.,  usually  known  as  Thomas 
Thomjjson,  son  of  Peter  and  Dorthea,  was  born  on 
the  island  of  l^ilster,  Denmark,  January  2,  1841. 
The  family  joined  the  Mormon  cliurcli  and  emigrated, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-team  under  Captain  Olsen, 
reaching  Ephraim  in  October,  1854.  Mother  died  on  the 
Mississippi  river  and  father  with  five  children  came  here, 
being  in  good  circumstances,  he  paid  the  fare  of  several 
others.  He  was  a  leader  in  public  imi>rovenients,  a  prom- 
inent churchman  and  assisted  in  building  the  fort.  He 
died  here  some  years  ago.  Thomas  removed  to  Circle 
Valley  in  1865  and  built  a  home,  which  he  was  compelled 
to  leave  witli  nearly  all  he  had  on  account  of  Indians  and 
return  to  Ephraim.  He  freighted  produce  to  the  mining 
camps  several  years  and  engaged  in  fanning.     In  1868 


HON.    iii:nkv    i:kai 

EPHRAIM. 


NK1[>S     P.     NKI1.8KX, 
EPHRAIM. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  341 

he  went  to  Cheyenne  after  emigrants.  Was  city 
street  supervisor  in  ISOfi-OT  and  county  road  supervisor 
in  1897-98.  Was  married  in  Ephraim  to  Mryj  J.  Whitloclj;, 
who  died  here,  leaving  two  cliildren:  Diantha  and  Lissa. 
Married  again  to  Gauey  M.  Christensen,  who  has  five 
living  cliildren:  John  O.,  Ida  E.,  Ole  H,,  Clarence  and 
Raymond. 

9UINN,  GEORGE,  saddler  and  harnessmaker,  and  no- 
tary public,  son  of  William  and  Mary  A.,  was  bom 
in  St.  Heliers,  Isle  of  Jers(?y,  England,  May  28, 1842. 
Father  was  a  furniture  dealer  and  cabinet  and  chair- 
maker.  Parents  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  came  to 
this  country  in  '56,  fitting  up  handcarts  at  Iowa  City  to 
cross  the  plains.  He  tired  of  the  work  and  stopped  to 
play  marbles  and  was  lost  from  his  parents,  they  stop- 
ping at  Council  Bluffs,  where  they  remained  four  years. 
In  '60  they  came  to  Utah  in  Joseph  W.  Young's  com- 
pany, an  ox  train,  and  located  in  Epliraim,  Christmas,  '64. 
liis  parents  died  here.  During  the  Black  Hawk  war 
George  w^as  a  member  of  the  martial  band  and  made 
saddles.  He  was  a  member  of  several  theatrical  compa- 
nies, being  a  comic  singer  and  comedian.  Was  postmas- 
ter for  seven  years  and  interested  in  many  enterprises. 
AVas  five  years  in  the  firm  of  Quinn,  Larsen  &  Co.,  that 
did  a  business  of  |25,000  annually.  In  '94  he  opened  his 
present  place  of  business,  manufacturing  harness  and 
saddles  and  dealing  in  wagons,  buggies,  agricultural  im- 
X^lements  and  real  estate  and  loaning  money.  His  wife 
was  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  William  B.  Wilson  of  Council 
Bluffs,  Iowa.  They  were  married  in  Salt  Lake  City,  Au- 
gust 17,  1862,  and  have  had  eleven  children:  William  H., 
Emma,  John,  Lilly,  Ida,  Myrtle  and  Hettie,  living; 
George  W.  and  Arthur  L.,  deceased. 

I^ASMUSSEN,  RASMUS,  farmer,  son  of  Hans  and 
jT  Maiy,  was  born  in  Denmark  February  16,  1845.  In 
V  '56  his  parents  and  five  children  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains-  late,  and  having  to  abandon  wagons 
and  contents  and  come  to  Salt  Lake  Citv  with  a  relief 


342  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTV. 

company.  Father  was  a  well-to-do  fanner'  in  Deiiini'.rk 
and  paid  the  fares  of  twenty-eight  persons  besides  his 
family.  In  '57  they  removed  to  Ephraim,  where  father 
died  in  '87,  mother  still  living.  Rasmus  grew  up  a 
farmer,  now  owns  fifty  acres  and  a  home  in  the  city.  Tr>ok 
part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  being  a  minuteman.  Was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  one  year,  and  has  held  sev- 
eral minor  offices.  Was  married  in  Ephraim  March  8, 
1866,  to  Annie  Bjerregaard.  She  had  four  sons:  Andrew, 
Hans,  Oliver  and  Homer.  Wife  died  and  he  married 
again  ]\ray  14,  1885,  to  Hannah,  daughter  of  Charles  and 
Catherine  Cooper.  She  has  three  children:  Rasmus  D., 
Charles  A.  and  John  E. 

50RENSEX,  SOREN  A.,  fanner,  son  of  Andrew  and 
Ollegor,  was  boi  n  in  Denmark  November  14,  1839. 
His  parents  joined  the  Moiinon  church  and  came  to 
Utah,  crossing  the  phiius  in  Captain  Olsen's  ox-train,  and 
located  in  Ei)lnaim,  ariiving  here  October  6,  1854.  They 
assisted  in  building  the  fort  and  lived  in  it  several  years. 
Father  died  May  21),  1875,  mother  October  26, 1879.  'Soren 
was  brought  up  on  a  farm  and  owns  seventyfive  acres  and 
his  home  in  the  city.  In  '(>1  he  went  to  the  Missouri 
river  after  emigrants.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war 
and  witnessed  the  killing  of  a  man  and  two  women  by 
Indians,  when  Black  Hawk  shot  at  him  but  missed.  Was 
married  in  Epliraim  October  26,  1861,  to  Johanna,  daugh- 
ter of  Johannes  and  Beugta  Larsen,  born  in  Sweden  Octo- 
ber 3,  1834.  They  have  three  living  children:  Annie,  wife 
of  Peter  H.  Peterson;  Hannah,  wife  of  Alfred  Bellander, 
and  Soren. 

$ORENSON,  JOHN,  merchant,  son  of  Neils  '.jid  Hel- 
ene,  was  bom  in  Denmark  August  19,  1853.  His 
parents  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  emigrated 
in  1854,  locating  in  Ephraim  in  September,  1855. 
They  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox-train,  father  pay- 
ing the  fares  of  several  others  and  coming  liere  without 
funds.  Father  died  March  4,  1893,  mother  still  living,  S2 
years  of  age.    J'^ather  and  two  sons  took  part  in  the  Black 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  343 

Hawk  war,  Jens  being  killed  by  the  Indians  in  Salina 
Canyon.  He  shot  five  Indians,  killing  three  in  his  last 
engagement,  being  shot  six  times  before  he  died.  John, 
though  a  small  boy,  took  part  in  the  war  and  had  a  nar- 
row escape  when  three  people  wei'e  killed  west  of  town. 
He  purchased  a  farm  and  worked  it  till  '93,  when  he 
engaged  in  the  mercantile  business,  ('arries  :i  ^3000 
stock  of  general  merchandise  and  does  a  good  business. 
Owns  his  store,  thii-ty  acres  of  land  and  a  nice  residence. 
Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  May  31,  187.5,  to  Johanna, 
daughter  of  Christian  and  Anna  C.  Simmonseu,  born  in 
Denmark  March  1,  1855.  They  have  had  seven  children: 
Don  C,  Hugh  L.  R.  and  Joan  C.,  living;  John  O.,  Nels  C, 
Edgar  A.  and  Johanna  J.,  deceased. 

50REySOX,  SOREX  X.,  farmer,  son  of  Xeils  and 
Helene,  was  born  in  Denmai'k  July  3,  1893.  The 
family  came  to  Ephraim  in  1855,  crossing  the  plains 
in  Captain  Guyman's  company,  and  lived  in  the  fort  for 
several  years.  Father  died  here  March  4,  1895,  mother 
still  living.  Soren  was  raised  to  farming  and  has  always 
followed  it.  In  '61  he  removed  to  Circle  Valley  to  assist 
in  settling  that  countiw;  lived  there  till  his  brother  Jens 
was  killed  by  Indians  in  Salina  Canyon,  when  he  re- 
turned to  Ephraim.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  in 
guarding  and  herding  stock.  His  first  wife  was  Carrie  E. 
Rasmussen.  She  has  three  children:  Xeils  P.,  Caroline 
M.  and  Enger  H.  Second  wife  was  Mary  C.  Sorenson. 
She  has  had  six  children:  Carrie  E.  and  Parley  E.,  liv- 
ing; Hannah,  Joseph  W.,  X^eils  C.  and  Soren  H.,  deceased. 

5TEYEXS,  HEXRY,  son  of  Henry  and  Chloe,  was  born 
in  Vermont  June  18,  1812.  He  came  to  Utah  in 
1850  and  lived  in  Payson  for  three  years,  then  re- 
moved to  Manti,  being  called  to  help  settle  Sanpete. 
Came  to  Ephraim  in  '54  and  assisted  in  building  the  fort. 
In  '01  he  went  to  Shonesburg,  where  he  lived  three  years, 
but  had  to  leave  on  account  of  Indians.  Removed  to  Rock- 
ville  and  in  '70  returned  to  Ephraim.  He  is  probably  the 
only  man  living  in  Ephraim  who  passed  through  all  the 


344  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

Mormoii  persecutions  in  Far  West,  Xauvoo  and  else- 
where. While  liyin<i'  in  Fai'  West  he  lost  |600  in  prop- 
evty,  in  Payson  he  lost  considerable  and  again  in  Dixie 
he  lost  all  lie  had.  During  the  past  twenty  years  he  has 
been  confined  to  the  house  most  of  the  time.  Was  mar- 
ried first  in  Canada  to  Mary  A.  Howe,  by  whom  he  has 
two  children:  Heniy  B..  and  Elisha,  Married  again  in 
Salt  Lake  City  July  25,  1854,  to  Augusta,  daughter  of 
Nicholas  and  Ann  S.  Dorius,  born  in  Copenhagen  August 
29,  1837.  Slie  has  four  living  children:  Charles  J.,  Laura 
A.,  Ellen  M.  Mild  Juliet. 

5TEYEXS,  llEXliY  B.,  farmer,  son  of  Henry  and  Mary 
A.,  was  born  in  New  York  State  October  26,  1S34. 
TLe  family  joined  the  Mormon  church,  living  in 
Nauvoo  and  Kiitland,  and  then  came  to  Utah  in  '50, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Captain  Pace's  comiDany,  and  lo- 
cated at  Farmington.  They  removed  to-  Paysoin,  thenoe 
to  Manti,  and  in  '54  came  to  Ephraim,  assisting  in 
building  the  fort.  Henry  has  always  followed  farming, 
now  owns  sixty  acres  of  land.  Took  pai-t  in  the  Walker 
war  at  Payson,  in  Sanpete  and  in  Dixie.  He  lived  here 
three  j-ears,  in  Spring  City  three  yeai-s  and  in  Dixie  seven 
3^ears,  returning  again  to  his  present  place.  Was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  CHty  Council  two  years.  His  first  wife,  mar-, 
ried  in  Ephraim,  was  Elizabeth  Whitlock.  She  has  four 
living  children:  ^Melinda,  Healon,  Olive  E.  and  Lula  L. 
Second  wife  was  Lucy  A.,  daughter  of  Redick  and  Lucy 
Allred.  She  has  three  children:  Newton  H.,  Lucy  A. 
and  Redick  E. 

5AYL0R,  HON.  GEORGE,  a  pioneer  of  '59,  son  of 
Thomas  and  Hannah,  was  bom  in  Woodborough, 
Nottinghamshire,  England,  March  16,  1830.  He  was 
raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon  church,  and  in 
March,  1853,  started  for  L^tah,  crossed  the  plains  in  Cap- 
tain Harmon's  train,  arriving  in  Salt  Lake  City  October 
16,  1853.  In  '56  he  reti>rned  to  England  on  a  two  years' 
mission.  In  the  fall  of  '59  he  located  at  Manti,  and  in  the 
spring  of  '60  came  to  Ephraim.    He  learned  the  trade  of 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  345 

sawyer  and  followed  it  for  thirty  years,  giving  uj)  the 
work  in  '95.  flais  also  carried  on  fanning.  Was  elected 
the  first  Mayor  of  Ephraini  and  held  the  office  three 
terms.  A  membefr  of  the'  Legislature  in  1868-69-70.  Took 
part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Served  as  bishop's  counsel- 
lor for  a  number  of  years  and  is  a  member  of  the  high 
council  and  stake  recordea'.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  to  Mary  A.  Quinn.  They  had  seven  children.  Maiy 
A.,  Harriet,  George,  Elizabeth,  Thomas,  Zina  and  Pre- 
sendia.    Second  wife  was  Ohai-lotte  E.  Leggett. 

SHOjMPSON,  ANDHEW,  SK.,  farmer,  son  of  Thomas 
and  Dorthea,  was  born  in  Falgverslov,  Denmark, 
December  4,  1831.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined 
the  Monnon  church  in  '53,  and  came  to  Utah,  crossing 
the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Captain  Fosgren,  and 
located  in  Spring  City.  The  company  was  short  of  pro- 
visions and  Andrew  with  others  went  to  Utah  county  and 
worked  for  food.  Advised  to  go  to  Manti  by  the  author- 
ity of  the  church  on  account  of  Indian  troubles.  Andrew 
lived  with  John  Beal  and  in  the  sj)ring  of  '54  came  to 
Ephraim  among  the  first  settlere.  They  built  a  fort  and 
lived  inside  it.  He  received  twenty  acres  of  land  and  en- 
gaged in  farming.  Was  active  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
standing  guard  and  doing  his  share.  He  is  first  counsel- 
lor to  the  bishop.  Was  married  in  Ephraim  November 
21,  1857,  to  Ohristena,  daughtei-  of  Andrew  and  Anna 
Jensen,  born  in  Denmark  August  6,  1837.  She  came  here 
in  '57,  pulling  a  handcart  1,300  miles.  Her  parents 
came  the  same  year  and  died  here.  Her  children  are: 
Andrew,  Jr.,  Diantha  C,  Thomas  P.,  Hannah  M.,  Eliza- 
beth A.,  Daniel  H.  and  Joseph  M.,  living;  Anna  M., 
James  and  Sena,  deceased. 

^H0:MPS0N,  NEILS,  farmer,  woolgrower  and  mer- 
V3  chant,  son  of  Peter  and  Dorthea,  was  bom  in  the 
island  of  Falster,  Denmark,  January  23,  1846.  The 
family  came  to  Ephraim  in  October,  1854,  where  Neils 
grew  up.  He  engaged  in  freighting  produce  to  the  min- 
ing camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada  from  1869  to  1879.  He 
took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in  the  engage- 


346  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

ments  in  Salina  Canyon  and  Grass  Valley.  In  1879-80  he 
went  on  a  mission  to  Denmark.  On  his  return  he  took 
a  homestead  at  Chester,  where  he  resided  three  years, 
then  returned  to  Ephraim  and  engaged  in  the  woolgrow- 
ing  business.  Now  owns  about  4,000  sheep;  has  a  one- 
half  interest  in  the  Gunnison  roller  mills  and  is  a  director 
in  the  Central  Utah  Wool  Compam^  at  Manti,  In  Janu- 
ary, 1898,  he  purchased  the  general  store  of  Peter 
Greaves,  Jr.,  and  his  sons  conduct  the  business  in  an 
obliging  and  successful  way.  His  first  wife  was  Caroline 
Schwalbe,  who  had  two  children.  Wife  and  children 
died.  Was  married  again  in  Ephraim  to  Mary  C  Hjer- 
min,  a  native  of  Norway.  She  has  had  eight  children; 
Jennie,  Nels  A.,  Blanche,  Joseph  H.,  Jacob  P.,  Agnes  C. 
and  Leander  T.,  living;  lialph  E.,  deceased. 

SJIOMPSON,  HON.  PETEK,  fanner  and  sheepraiser, 
son  of  Peter  P.  and  Mary,  was  born  in  Ephraim 
July  17,  1800.  His  parents  came  from  Denmark  in 
'54  and  located  in  Ephraim.  Father  was  a  prominent 
man,  an  earnest  churchman  and  hard  worker  for  good 
roads  and  public  improvements.  He  paid  the  emigration 
fares  of  many  poor  people  and  was  well  liked  by  every- 
body. Father  died  in  1875,  mother  died  in  1890.  Peter 
was  raised  on  a  farm  and  turned  his  attention  to  shee]> 
raising,  now  having  a  large  herd.  He  was  the  oldest 
child  and  did  much  to  support  and  care  for  his  parents. 
In  '90  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council.  Was 
Justice  of  the  Peace  one  year;  Mayor  of  the  city  two 
years,  and  a  member  of  the  State  Legislature,  elected  on 
the  Republican  ticket.  Was  married  in  1866  to  Lena 
Anderson,  who  died  one  year  later,  leaving  one  child, 
which  died  at  the  age  of  six  years.  Married  again  Octo- 
ber 4,  1892,  to  Maria,  daughter  of  Neils  and  Mary  Peter- 
son, born  in  Ephraim.  They  have  had  three  children: 
Effie  and  Senia  M.,  living;  Marie,  deceased. 

^HORPE,  CHRISTIAN  L.,  farmer,    son  of  Lars    and 

03     Bodild  Peterson,  was  born  in  Denmark  Januaiy  5, 

1834.    He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon 

church  and  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  347 

train  under  Oapt.  Saundere,  reaching  Epbraim  Septem- 
ber 12,  1863.  Worked  at  different  occupations  until  after 
the  Indian  war,  when  he  bought  a  small  farm,  now  has 
fifty  acres.  Was  a  Lieutenant  of  minutemen  during  the 
Black  Hawk  war  and  took  an  active  part.  He  was  at  the 
mill  in  Ephraim  canyon  when  several  were  killed  by 
Indians.  Seryed  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  four 
years  and  has  held  seyeral  minor  offices.  Is  a  member  of 
the  High  Council  and  was  bishop  of  the  North  Ward  over 
two  years.  Was  married  in  Denmark  June  8,  1855,  to 
Anna  M.,  daughter  of  Mads  and  Mette  Knudsen,  born  in 
Denmark  December  13,  1832.  They  have  five  living  chil- 
dren: Thomas,  Christian  L.,  Mary  A.,  Andrew  L.  and 
Josejjh.  Second  wife  was  Kirsty  Sorensen.  She  has  five 
children :    Hannah,  Charles,  Laura,  Callie  and  David. 

SllOKPE,  HIKAIM,  farmer,  son  of  William  and  Char- 
lotte Ciiise,  was  born  in  Ephraim  May  2,  1862.  His 
parents  were  English  and  came  to  Utah  about  1854, 
locating  in  Ephraim  in  1857.  Father  was  a  music 
teaclier  and  leader  of  the  Tabernacle  choir  several  years. 
He  was  killed  east  of  Ephraim  in  '65  during  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  IMother  is  still  living  in  Nephi.  Hiram  was 
raised  here  and  was  engaged  eight  years  in  getting  out 
lumber,  then  working  a  shingle  mill.  Has  eighty  acres 
of  land  and  is  now  engaged  in  farming  and  stockraising. 
WsLS  manied  in  Logan  Temple  March  10,  1886,  to  Mary 
D.,  daughter  of  A.,C.  and  Mary  E.  Anderson  Nielson, 
born  in  Ephraim.  They  have  had  six  children:  William 
E.,  Mary  C,  Ada  P.  and  Nina  V.,  living;  Amo®  H,  and 
Andrew  E.,  deceased. 

I  I CKERMANN,  C.  A.,  of  the  firm  of  C.  A.  Uckermann 
CJ  &  Co.,  planing  mill,  son  of  Johan  and  Annetta,  was 
born  in  Bergen,  Norway,  January  31,  1842.  He 
learned  the  trade  of  railroad  engineer  and  car  builder. 
Joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '56  and  came  to  Utah  in 
'63,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Saunder's  ox-train,  and 
located  in  Ephraim.  He  began  making  spinning  wheels 
and  in  '66  built  a  shop,  where  he  manufactured  shingles 


348  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

and  furnitiue.  lu  '70  lie  put  iu  the  first  planing  mill  in 
Sanpete  county  at  the  present  site,  changing-  it  in  '94  to 
a  steam  mill.  It  is  now  fitted  Avith  machinery  for  making 
all  kinds  of  building  material  and  chopping  feed.  He 
also  has  a  sawmill  attached.  Was  an  active  man  during 
the  Black  Hawk  war.  His  first  wife,  married  in  Eph- 
raim,  was  Johanna  Larsen.  She  had  three  sons:  Charles, 
Albert  and  Andrew.  Second  wife  was  Katrina  Ericksen 
of  Ephraim.  She  had  six  children:  Agnes,  Hannah, 
Maggie,  Ernest,  Bertha  and  Irena.  Third  wife  was  Chris- 
tina Larsen.     No  children. 

1  I  AlITLOCK,  CHARLES,  saddle  and  harnessmaker, 
\XJ  ^<'i^  '^'f  Andrew  and  Hannah,  was  bor-ii  in  Eay 
county,  Missouri,  January  4,  1833.  His  parents 
were  among  the  early  members  of  the  Mormon  church, 
passing  through  all  the  persecutions  in  Missouri  and 
Illinois.  He  came  to  Utah  in  '51,  di*iving  seven  yoke  of 
oxen  for  Livingston  and  Kincaid.  Stopped  in  Manti  for 
a  time,  locating  in  Spring  City  and  then  returning  to 
Manti  on  account  of  Indians,  finally  locating  in  Ephraim 
in  '54,  The  family  then  consisted  of  his  father,  three 
sons  and  five  daughters.  They  assisted  in  building  the 
fort  and  took  part  in  the  Indian  Avars,  his  brother  Andrew 
was  wounded  by  an  arrow,  but  recovered.  Father  died 
in  Ephraim  in  'G5.  Charles  learned  the  harness  trade  in 
Missouri  and  has  folloAAed  it  about  thirty  years.  He  owns 
a  thirty-five-acre  fann  near  Mayfield.  Was  constable 
seven  years  and  City  Marshal  one  year.  His  wife  was 
Caroline  M.,  daughter  of  Eleazer  and  Caroline  King,  born 
in  New  York,  They  were  married  in  Spring  City  Febru- 
avy  1,  1853,  and  haA'e  six  children:  Charles,  George, 
Caroline,  'S^'arren,  John  and  Hannah, 

1  f  /ILLARDSON,  CHRISTIAN,  JR,,  farmer,  son  of 
\XJ  Christian  and  Mary,  was  bom  in  Ephraim  No- 
vember 6,  1870,  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
when  he  gTew  up  engaged  in  farming.  Owns  a  fine  farm 
of  seventy-five  acres  at  Mayfield,  thirty-five  acres  near 
Ephraim  and  a  good  brick  residence  in  this  city.    He  was 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  349 

one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Ephraim  Equitable  Creamery 
Oompauy,  being  president  about  two  years.  Has  aiways 
been  an  active  worker  in  church  matters,  being  one  of 
the  missionary  aides  to  the  superintendent  of  Sunday 
schools  of  the  stake,  A^^as  maiTied  in  Manti  Temple 
March  28,  1894,  to  Lillie,  daughter  of  George  and  Kisty 
Larsen,  born  in  Ephraim  December  22,  1871.  They  have 
two  children:  Maiy  A.,  boiii  January  21,  1895,  and  Kisty 
().,  September  10,  1890.  Mr.  Willardson  went  on  a  mis- 
sion for  two  years,  leaving  home  May  3,  1898. 

1  I  /iLLARDSON,  CHEISTIAN,  deceased,  one  of  the 
\XJ  hrst  settlers  of  Ei>hraim,  was  born,  in  Denmark 
April  G,  1810.  He  was  left  an  orphan  when  very 
small  and  on  his  own  resources.  Started  Avith  nothing 
but  soon  obtained  a  farm  and  became  quite  comfortable. 
He  joined  the  Moinnon  church  about  '51  and  in  '52  started 
with  his  wife  for  Utah,  crossed  the  plains  by  ox-train  in 
Capt.  Fosgren's  company,  reaching  Spring  City  in  the 
fall  of  '53.  Was  soon  driven  to  Manti  by  Indians,  and  in 
the  spring  of  '54  came  to  Ephraim  and  helped  build  the 
fort.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and 
passed  through  all  the  trials  of  grasshopi>ers  and  Indians 
incident  to  early  days.  He  had  an  interest  in  the  lirst 
burr  mill,  and  finally  organized  a  company  and  built  the 
Climax  lioller  Mill,  of  which  he  was  president  and  the 
principal  stockholder  till  his  death.  Was  engaged  in 
merchandising,  his  store  being  later  incorporated  as  tlie 
Co-op.  He  constructed  a  tannery  and  caiTied  on  farming 
and  freighting  produce  to  market.  Was  a  leading  man 
in  the  community.  Bought  a  buiT  mill  in  jMayfield  and 
changed  it  to  the  present  roller  process,  now  owned  by 
the  family.  Performed  a  mission  to  Denmark  and 
brought  several  emigrants  to  Utah.  Was  first  married 
in  Denmark  in  April,  1851,  to  Karen  Peterson.  She  has 
five  children  living:  Willard,  Christina,  Erastus  C, 
Joseph  and  Maria.  Second  wife  was  Mary  Larson.  She 
has  four  children:  Chnstian,  Caroline,  Andrew  and 
James.  She  had  two  children  by  a  former  marriage: 
Mary  A.  Allred  and  Mena  Oviatt.     Third  wife  was  Ann 


k 


350  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

K.  Sorenson,  boru  in  Denmark  November  10,  1849.  She 
came  to  Ephraim  in  September,  1871,  was  married  No- 
vember 13,  1871,  and  has  four  children:  Annie,  wife  of 
James  R.  AVare;  Loiinda,  wife  of  Lester  Braithwaite; 
Peter  and  John. 

I  I  /ILLARDSON,  EEASTUS,  son  of  Christian  and 
^J^  Caroline  Sorenson,  was  born  in  Ephraim  Febru- 
aiy  6,  1858.  His  parents  came  from  Denmark  in 
•52,  crossing'  the  plains  in  Capt.  Fosgren's  compam^,  and 
located  in  Ephraim  in  '54.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and 
freighted  pi-oiluce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and 
Nevada  for  several  years.  Learned  to  be  a  miller  in  his 
father's  mill — the  Staj' — and  in  '88  went  on  a  two  years' 
mission  to  Denmark.  On  his  return  he  took  charge  of  the 
Climax  Ivoller  Mill;  now  owns  an  interest  and  is  superin- 
tendent. Is  president  of  the  Junction  Co-op  and  has  an 
intewst  in  the  Mayfield  Eoller  Mill  at  Mayfleld.  He  owns 
a  farm  and  operates  it.  Is  a  bishop's  counsellor.  Was 
majTied  in  Salt  Lake  City  December  9,  1880,  to  Caroline 
B.,  daughter  of  Tora  and  Margaret  A.  Hansen  Thurston, 
born  in  Ei)hraim  July  6,  1862.  They  have  had  eight  chil- 
dren: Ann  C,  I^ennie  L.,  Erastus  L.,  Sarah  G.  and  an 
infant,  living;  Mai-gai-et  L.,  Victoria  and  Leland,  de- 
ceased. ,  •!]  !f^l|p 


FAIRVIEW. 


FAIKVIEW  is  situated  at  the  north  end  of  Sanpete 
Valley,  six  miles  from  Mt.  Pleasant,  and  as  the 
name  implies,  commands  an  excellent  view  of  the 
^reat  granaiy  extending  south  even  beyond  Manti,  thirty 
miles  distant.  This  magniticent  location  was  selected  in 
1859  as  a  suitable  spot  for  forming  a  colony,  and  a  band 
of  brave  veterans,  consisting  of  James  H.  Jones,  Henry 
W.  Sanderson,  Lindsay  A.  Brady,  Jehu  Cox,  Isaac  Y. 
Vance  and  others  left  their  families  in  the  fort  at  Mt. 
Pleasant  and  erected  homes,  which  were  surrounded  by 
a  small  fort,  on  the  site  of  the  present  city.  The  follow- 
ing spring  they  removed  to  the  new  quarters  and  pro- 
ceeded to  constnict  ditches  for  imgating  crops.  The 
most  conseiwative  men  estimated  that  there  was  suffi- 
cient water  to  supply  tw^enty-five  or  thirty  families,  and 
therefore  advised  new  settlers  to  seek  other  more  favored 
localities. 

The  present  population,  numbering  probaMy  1,800 
comfortably  situated  farmers,  stockraisers,  woolgrowers 
and  horticulturists,  demonstrates  that  the  fear  of  over- 
crowding was  not  well  grounded,  and  even  today  the 
boundaiies  are  increasing  and  the  city  growing  in  com- 
mercial importance  with  every  annual  round  in  the  cycle 
of  time.  But,  these  indications  of  happiness,  luxuiy  and 
wealth  were  not  obtained  without  many  hard  struggles 
against  Indians,  cold  and  hunger,  mixed  with  disappoint- 
ment in  harvesting  croj)S  and  consequent  poverty  and  dis- 
tress of  the  pioneers.  The  settlement  was  known  as 
North  Bend  until  1864,  when  a  postofflce  was  obtained 
and  the  present  appropriate  title,  Fairview,  was  suggest- 
ed by  Archibald  Anderson,  Sr.,  to  Orson  Hyde,  then  pres- 
ident of  Sanpete  Stake.  Being  a  frontier  town,  the  peo- 
ple were  kept  in  constant  dread  of  Indian  depredations, 


352  HISTOEY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

and  many  of  tlie  crimes  of  tiie  redmen  recorded  in  the 
county  history  were  committed  in  this  vicinity. 

In  18()G  the  Indians  became  so  troublesome  and  nu- 
merous that  the  settlers  were  forced  to  leave  their  homes 
and  seek  refuge  in  the  larger  settlements.  The  men  re- 
turned that  fall,  however,  and  erected  a  larger  and 
sti'onger  fort,  in  which  the  families  were  sheltered  until 
the  Black  Hawk  war  ceased  and  peace  was  declared.  A 
plain  narrative  of  the  many  hardships  endured  in  these 
ti'^'ing  days  cannot  give  any  idea  of  the  days  and 
Tiionths  of  long  suffering,  anxiety  and  privations 
of  the  primitive  colonists,  Avho  entered  upon  the 
lands  of  sagebrush  and  cacti,  with  earnest  resolu- 
tions to  conquer  their  foes,  reclaim  the  desert  and  erect 
])ermanent  homes  for  themselves  and  families.  The  In- 
dians and  giasshoppers  came  from  the  mountains  and 
canyons  to  i)illage  and  destroy  homes,  crops  and  cattle 
and  lay  waste  the  land  of  the  colonists.  But  the  people 
were  men  and  women  of  strong  muscular  force,  inured 
to  hardships  and  determined  to  crown  their  efforts  with 
success. 

Fairview  was  incorporated  as  a  city,  by  act  of  the 
Legislature,  Februaiy  10,  1872,  and  included  twenty 
square  miles.  In  the  fall  of  this  year  the  tinal  treaty  of 
peace  with  the  Indians  was  signed  at  Mi.  Pleasant  and 
the  Black  Hawk  war  closed,  leaving  the  people  at  liberty 
tc  till  the  soil  unmolested.  With  no  further  obstacles  to 
progress  and  a  municipal  administration  as  protection, 
the  community  began  to  prosper.  Irrigation  canals  were 
constructed,  mercantile  establishments  opened  and  saw- 
mills erected  for  the  manufacture  of  lumber.  The  co- 
operative plan  governed  in  all  public  enterprises  and  the 
general  welfare  of  the  people  was  considered  in  every 
transaction  of  a  public  nature.  The  results  of  such  a  pol- 
icy are  noticeable  in  the  solid  financial  institutions,  mer- 
cantile houses,  creamery,  sawmills  and  other  branches  of 
iudustiy  now  standing  as  monuments  to  entei*prise,  hon- 
esty and  a  union  of  individual  interests. 

The  Co-op  store  was  among  the  first  financial  invest- 
ments, commencing  on  a  very  limited  scale  and  growing 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  353 

witli  the  city  to  its  present  dimensions.  Hon.  Peter 
Sundwall  was  the  first  manager  under  whose  wise  direc- 
tion the  institution  prospered.  The  present  manager, 
Hyrum  De  Fries,  is  an  able  and  capable  business  man, 
and  transacts  the  great  volume  of  business  in  a  most 
creditable  manner.  The  company  carries  a  general  stock 
of  114,000  in  merchandise,  dry  goods,  groceries,  farm  im- 
plements and  machinery'  and  transacts  a  good  business 
in  lumber,  sheep  and  grain.  In  addition  to  the  store,  the 
company  has  two  sawmills,  and  owns  an  interest  in  the 
Union  Eoller  Mills  and  the  Co-op  sheep  herd. 

Swen  and  Lars  Nielson  are  most  enterprising  and 
much  respected  citizens  and  have  a  well  stocked  general 
supply  house  which  is  a  credit  to  the  city.  They  began 
as  poor  boys  and  have  climbed  the  ladder  of  prosperity 
until  they  are  known  as  the  largest  farmers  and  mer- 
chants in  the  northern  end  of  Sanpete  county.  They 
cany  a  stock  of  |12,000  to  |15,000  of  general  merchan- 
dise and  do  an  enormous  business.  The}^  also  own  1200 
acres  of  land  and  are  engaged  in  farming,  stockraising 
and  woolgrowing.  The  business  of  buying  and  selling 
sheep  and  cattle  in  which  they  are  engaged  furnishes 
a  market  for  local  growers  and  distributes  many  thous- 
ands of  dollars  annually  among  the  people  of  Fairview 
and  vicinity 

The  irrigation  question  is  an  important  feature  of 
success  in  Fairview  and  vicinity,  and  several  companies 
have  been  incorporated  to  properl^^  control  and  distrib- 
ute the  irirgation  waters.  The  Gooseberiy  and  Cotton- 
wood In'igation  company,  with  a  capital  stock  of  |20,000, 
was  incoi-porated  February  25,  1890.  The  Meadow  Irri- 
gation company,  with  a  capitalization  of  |500,  was  incor- 
porated May  3,  1890.  The  Oak  Creek  Irrigation  company 
was  incorporated  February  18,  1889,  with  a  capital  stock 
of  12,210.  The  Birch  Creek  Irrigation  company,  with  a 
capital  stock  of  |1,000,  was  incorporated  March  11,  1889. 
The  Mammoth  Eeservoir  company,  incorporated  March 
4,  1890,  with  headquarters  at  Manti,  contemplates  the 
impounding  of  the  waters  of  Gooseberry  creek  near  this 
place,   and   utilizing  the  vast  volume  now   running  to 


354  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

waste  for  irrigating-  a  large  area  of  desert  land  in  the 
valley  below  this  city  and  throughout  the  county. 

In  1890  the  Eio  Grande  Western  railroad  was  com- 
pleted through  the  city  and  a  highway  of  commerce 
opened  for  all  home  products.  This  stimulated  the  lum- 
ber business,  which  has  become  one  of  the  great  money 
producing  industries  of  the  city,  and  until  the  Govern- 
ment agents  so  rigidly  enforced  the  timber  cutting  laws, 
many  of  the  most  representative  citizens  w^ere  engaged 
in  lumbering.  The  railroad  put  Fairview  in  communi- 
cation with  the  markets  of  the  world,  furnishing  the 
marts  for  consuming  the  surplus  products  of  ranch  and 
range,  thereby  making  of  this  city  one  of  the  leading 
shipping  points  of  Sanpete  county.  The  farms  have  been 
extended  to  include  Oak  Creek  and  the  surrounding  dis- 
trict and  Fairview^  proper  is  rapidly  becoming  a  large 
and  prosperous  agricultural  community,  with  her  bor- 
ders enlarging  year  by  year  to  a  rich  and  contented  col- 
ony of  industrious  husbandmen. 

Soon  after  the  opening  of  the  coal  mines  at  Wales, 
the  Deseret  Coal  and  Coke  company  was  organized  by  Ca- 
nute Peterson,  John  H.  Hougaard  and  others,  to  develop 
the  rich  coal  fields  near  Fairview.  The  mine  is  located 
fifteen  miles  northeast  of  this  city  and  a  twelve  foot  vein 
of  fine  fuel  has  been  uncovered  for  many  years.  This  in- 
dustry has  been  operated  principally  by  residents  of  Fair- 
view,  Ephraim  and  Manti,  and  has  furnished  an  addi- 
tional business  impetus  to  the  place.  The  New  York 
mine,  located  near  the  Deseret,  yields  a  fine  quality  of 
bituminous  coal  and  has  been  worked  for  the  past  quar- 
ter of  a  century.  Other  mineral  deposits  near  the  city 
have  attracted  the  attention  of  local  and  foreign  pros- 
pectors, and  much  money  has  been  expended  in  develop- 
ing the  various  claims.  The  rich  coal  measures  are  no 
doubt  indications  of  the  presence  of  iron  and  other  de- 
posits which  time  will  discover  and  add  another  import- 
ant industry  to  the  numerous  resources  of  this  favored 
community. 

The  Latter-day  Saints  organized  a  ward  and  erected 
a  meeting-house  soon  after  the  settlement  was  begun, 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  855 

and  Amasa  Tucker  was  appointed  the  Presiding  Bishop . 
The  several  church  societies,  including  Sunday  School, 
Relief  Society,  JNIutual  Improvement  Associations,  Pri- 
maries, Quorums  and  other  organizations  were  added, 
and  the  church  has  nourished  along  with  the  prosperity 
of  the  people.  The  people  are  noted  at  home  and  abroad 
for  their  honesty,  temperance  and  general  moral  attrib- 
utes, due  to  the  high  religious  sentiment  and  absence  of 
saloons  and  other  temptations  to  the  young.  Bishop 
James  C.  Peterson,  who  was  honored  as  a  member  of  the 
Constitutional  convention,  now  presides  over  the  ward  in 
a  satisfactory  manner,  being  well  liked  by  the  people. 
No  poverty  or  beggary  is  noticed  throughout  the  ward 
and  the  members  ai^e  honestly  and  conscientiously  living 
their  religion. 

A  mission  school  was  opened  in  1881  by  Miss  Sara 
Sorenson,  a  pupil  of  the  Wasatch  Academy  at  Mt.  Pleas- 
ant. This  was  under  the  auspices  of  the  Presbyterian 
Board  of  Missions,  and  though  hampered  by  many  incon- 
veniences, prospered  beyond  expectations.  After  three 
years  Miss  M.  Fishback  followed  as  teacher  and  remained 
for  five  years,  when  Misses  Mary  Nielsen  and  Sadie  Meil- 
ing  continued  the  school.  They  were  from  the  Wasatch 
Academy  at  Mt.  Pleasant.  An  old  dwelling  house  with 
a  lot  was  purchased  and  in  1894  a  chapel  was  erected. 
The  Misses  Sadie  McOlure  and  Nettie  Gray  are  the  pres- 
ent efficient  instructors  and  the  school  is  a  popular  edu- 
cational institution.  Religious  services  have  been  held 
by  Rev.  E.  N.  Mui-phy  and  Elder  James  Todd  of  Mt. 
Pleasant,  and  several  additions  to  the  church  have  been 
made.  The  members  hold  fellowship  with  the  church  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  until  an  organization  shall  be  effected  in 
Fairview. 

The  people  of  Fairview  have  always  been  interested 
in  educating  the  young  and  have  provided  good  school 
houses  and  able  instructors.  Many  of  the  representative 
young  men  and  women  of  Sanpete's  educational  affairs 
are  residents  of  this  city,  and  numerous  students  of  both 
sexes  have  graduated  from  the  higher  schools  and  col- 
leges of  the  State.    An  excellent  public  school  system  is 


356  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

conducted  under  the  present  able  management  of  Prof. 
A.  U.  Miner,  principal,  assisted  by  O.  M.  Sanderson, 
Heber  Olsen,  Annie  D.  Stevens  and  Helena  Anderson, 
all  competent  and  capable  instructors.  The  school  trus- 
tees for  1898  are:  Hon.  Samuel  Bills,  Hon.  Peter  Sund- 
wall  and  Lewis  Larson.  The  enumeration  for  1898  gives 
Fairview  a  school  poulation  of  197  pupils,  with  a  valua- 
tion of  15,862.50  for  school  property. 

The  Union  Koller  Mill  is  one  of  the  results  of  co- 
operative efforts  in  behalf  of  the  city,  and  an  indication 
of  enterprise  characteristic  of  the  prominent  citizens. 
This  is  a  fifty-baiTel  mill,  well  equipped,  Avith  all  mod- 
ern machinery  for  doing  first-class  custom  and  commer- 
cial Avork.  The  mill  is  leased  by  John  A.  A\  alker  and 
Hans  P.  Hansen,  two  popular  citizens,  who  keep  it  run- 
ning all  the  year  'round.  Fairview  flour  finds  a  ready 
market  everywhere  and  the  supply  is  never  equal  to  the 
demand.  The  mill  is  appreciated  as  supplying  a  good 
home  market  for  much  of  the  wheat  for  which  Fairview 
farms  are  noted  for  producing. 

The  Fairview  Creamery  is  owned  by  the  people, 
through  a  co-operation  of  capital  and  labor,  and  is  a 
credit  to  the  industrious  fanners  and  a  money-producing 
concern  for  the  city.  Hon.  Swen  O.  Nielson  is  the  able 
and  efficient  manager,  under  whose  direction  the  com- 
pany has  made  a  success  and  pays  handsome  dividends. 
The  manufacture  of  butter  and  cheese  is  carried  on  at  all 
seasons  and  a  ready  cash  market  obtained  for  all  the  pro- 
ducts. This  has  stimulated  the  people  to  the  purchasing 
and  feeding  of  better  cows  and  resulted  in  a  constant 
cash  income  to  many  farmers  in  the  vicinity,  who  supply 
the  creamery  with  milk. 

Fairview  people  have  always  been  noted  for  their 
love  of  amusements  and  the  home  talent  developed  in 
theatrical  performances.  As  a  natural  I'esult  the  city 
has  a  Social  Hall  and  Eclipse  pavilion  devoted  to  danc- 
ing, public  meetings  and  dramatic  entertainments.  On 
politics  the  citizens  have  been  the  same  as  in  other  set- 
tlements throughout  the  county,  in  that  the  People's 
Paj:ty  has  always  controlled,  until  National  parties  were 


JAIVlKS    ANDKRSON. 
1<\\  1  KN'IKW. 


JOHN    ANDERSON, 
FAIRVIEW. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  357 

organized.  The  two  parties  are  about  equally  represented 
and  several  prominent  men  have  been  elected  to  State 
and  county  offices  from  this  city.  Among  the  most  rep- 
resentative official  citizens  are  Hons.  James  C.  Peterson, 
Peter  Sundwall,  Swen  O.  Nielson  and  Samuel  Bills,  who 
have  held  important  offices. 

In  1895  the  Sanpete  County  Poor  House  w^as  com- 
pleted and  became  a  fixed  institution  added  to  the  busi- 
ness interests  of  Fairview.  It  is  an  elegant  brick  struc- 
ture, situated  in  a  beautiful  spot,  one  and  one-half  miles 
northeast  of  the  city  and  suiTounded  by  a  fine  farm  and 
orchard.  The  inmates  ai-e  few,  but  are  well  cared  for  by 
competent  and  trained  attendants,  under  the  able  man- 
agement of  Jordan  Brady.  This  acquisition  to  the  busi- 
ness of  Fairview  was  obtained  chiefly  through  the  earn- 
est labors  of  Hon.  Swen  O.  Xielson  and  Thomas  D.  Rees, 
who  at  the  time  of  location  were  County  Selectmen. 

Fairview  has  all  the  prominent  business  houses  and 
tradesmen  represented  by  similar  sized  cities;  an  excel- 
lent water  supply  and  perfect  system  of  distribution;  un- 
excelled climate  for  fruit-growing  and  gardening;  an 
industrious,  peaceable  and  educated  community  of  lib- 
erty-loving people;  numerous  mineral  deposits  of  coal 
and  other  valuable  metals;  fine  building  stone  and  many 
lumber  mills,  manufacturing  native  timber;  and  a  future 
of  untold  wealth  and  happiness  for  the  present  and  com- 
ing generations.  The  municipal  matters  are  well  man- 
aged by  good  men,  alive  to  the  interests  of  the  city  and 
economical  disbursement  of  funds.  Hon.  Lorenzo  Peter- 
son presides  as  ]Mayor.  Heber  01  sen  is  Justice  of  the 
Peace  and  H.  W.  Sanderson,  Jr.,  Constable. 

Fairview  has  a  nice  public  library  containing  over 
700  volumes;  is  connected  with  adjoining  towns  by  pub- 
lic telephone  and  has  some  of  the  most  representative  cit- 
izens in  the  county.  When  volunteers  were  called  for  in 
the  war  with  Spain,  Chas.  Asplund  enlisted.  He  was 
soon  promoted  to  the  position  of  Sergeant  in  Company 
B,  Utah  Battery,  now  located  at  Manila.  James  Swenson 
is  also  in  the  Government  service  at  the  Presidio,  Califor- 
nia, as  an  expert  horseman. 


PROMINENT  CITIZENS  OF  FAIRVIEW. 


A  I^LRED,  JAMES  M.,  farmer,  sou  of  Isaac  and  Julia 
H  A.  Taylor,  was  boru  in  Caldwell  county,  Mo.,  Feb- 
/  ruary  14,  1839.  The  family  were  driven  out  when 
lie  was  three  weeks  old,  and  in  '15  removed  to  Garden 
Grove,  Iowa,  then  to  Council  Bluffs^  and  in  '51  stai"ted 
for  Utah,  father  being  Captain  of  lift}'  wagons.  In  the 
company  were  not  less  than  thirty  AUreds,  James'  father 
bringing  two  wives  and  eleven  children.  They  i*eached 
Salt  Lake  City  in  August  and  settU'd  in  Kaysward.  In 
'53  father  went  on  a  three  years'  mission  to  England .  In 
'58  they  removed  to  Ephraim,  and  in  '59,  James  and 
brother,  Sydney  II.  and  Al  Zal>riskie  with  five  yoke  of 
cattle,  were  the  hrst  to  drive  on  the  present  site  of  Mt. 
Pleasant.  Father  died  in  Mt.  Tleasant;  mother  living  in 
Cache  county.  JamevS  lived  there  till  '02,  then  bought  a 
fifteen  acre  farm  in  Fa.irview,  whei"e  h(^  now  owns  sev- 
ent\'-five  acres.  He  had  a.  meat  market  for  several  years. 
Was  Constable  and  jMarshal  twelve  years.  In  '81  he  went 
on  a  mission  to  Tennessee  and  Alabama.  Was  maiTied 
March  2-7,  1860,  to  Maiw  F.,  daughter  of  Isaac  Y.  and 
Martha  E.  Vance,  born  in  Hancock  county,  111.,  Septem- 
ber 6,  1841.  They  had  eleven  children,  Mai-tha  E..  Mar- 
tin W,.  Isaac  W.,  Sarah  F.,  Mary  A.,  Minnie  A.,  Ernest 
E.,  Lawrence  and  Edgar  L.,  living;  Ann  E.  and  George 
A.,  deceased.  Manied  again  May  IG,  1868,  to  Christiana 
Anderson.  She  had  eleven  children,  James  C,  John  F., 
Emanuel,  Louis,  Junius  S.,  Legrande,  Frederick  H.  and 
Dorcas  A.,  living;  Mary  E.,  Minerva  and  Iduma  deceased. 
He  has  had  twenty-eight  grandchildren. 

ANDERSON,  JAMES,  farmer,  son  of  Archibald  and 
r\  Agnes  A  damson,  was  born  in  Scotland,  October  3, 
'  1842.  His  parents  came  to  Fairwiew  in  March,  1860, 
where  he  was  raised  on  a  fann.    He  owns  a  nice  farm  of 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  359 

seventy  acres  and  has  3,000  sheep.  Is  president  of  the 
Co-op  store;  director  in  the  Union  Eoller  Mills  Co.,  and 
stockholder  in  the  Creamery  and  Social  Hall  companies. 
Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  for  several  years.  He  went 
back  to  the  Missouri  river  with  Bishop  Seely  after  emi- 
grants, being  with  the  company  when  six  men  were 
drowned  in  Green  river.  Assisted  in  rescuing  the  troops 
from  Salt  Lake  City  when  surrounded  by  Indians  in 
Thistle  Valley  during  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Twenty-Sixth  Quorum  of  Seventies.  Was  mar- 
ried in  FaiiwioAV,  January  1,  1866,  to  Hannah  M.,  daugh- 
ter of  Elam  and  Hannah  Cheney,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
They  have  had  nine  children:  James,  Jr.,  Hannah  E.,  Ma- 
tilda D.,  Archie  E.,  Elam  IL,  Agues,  Sylvia  R.  and  Loren 
A.,  living;  John  W.,  deceased. 

A  XDERSOX,  JOHX,  farmer  and  stockman,  son  of 
M  Archibald  and  Agnes  Adamson,  was  bom  in  Glas- 
/  gow,  Scotland,  July  28,  1840.  His  father  came  to 
Utah  in  '55,  mother  and  three  sons  coming  in  '56,  crossing 
the  plains  in  a  handcart  company  under  Capt.  Daniel 
McArthur.  The  family  had  their  own  cart  and  started 
from  Iowa  City.  They  settled  ten  miles  south  of  Salt 
Lake  City,  then  removed  to  Spanish  Fork,  and  in  '60 
came  to  Faii-^iew  and  helped  build  the  fort.  Father  was 
a  prominent  man  in  the  church  and  died  here  in  '68. 
Mother  died  here  August  19,  1891.  John  worked  in  the 
coal  mines  in  Scotland  till  he  came  to  Utah.  He  took  ten 
acres  of  land  when  he  came  here  and  now  owns  100 
acres  and  2,500  sheep.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war,  being  one  of  the  minutemen.  He  made  two  trips 
to  l?ichfiel(l  to  assist  the  people  in  removing  from  there 
during  the  Indian  troubles.  Was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  for  twelve  years.  Served  as  superintendent  of 
the  Sunday  School  for  several  years,  and  is  a  member  of 
tlijB  Twenty-Sixth  Quorum  of  Seventies.  Has  always 
been  an  active,  public-spirited  man.  Is  a  stockhokler  in 
the  Creamery  and  Co-op  store.  Was  man-ied  in  Wales, 
Utah,    Febiiiaiy   20,    1863,   to   Helena   R.,    daughter   of 


o60  HISTOEY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Thomas  aud  Ma,i'}>aret  D.  Eees,  bom  in  Wales  (Old  Couu- 
try),  ^Novenibei'  5,  1846.  They  have  had  eleven  children: 
Agnes  J.,  Archibald  K.,  Sarah  A.,  Leonora,  Helena,  Ter- 
resa,  John  E.,  Maud  M.  and  Margaret  G.,  living;  others 
died  in  infancy. 

f\  NDERSON,  PETEE,  fanner,  son  of  Jens  and  (Innnel, 
K|  was  born  in  Christiania,  Norway,  Decembe]"  22, 
/  1857.     The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church,  and 

in  '7^  he  came  to  Utah,  locating  in  Salt  Lake  City,  where 
he  lived  six  years.  He  worked  in  the  mining  camps  for 
a  time,  settled  in  Fairview  in  '70,  and  in  '88  located  at 
Oak  Creek,  where  he  owns  a  farm  of  seventy-five  acres 
and  a  nice  brick  residence.  He  is  first  counsellor  to  the 
president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  March  14,  1877,  to  Lena  Peterson,  a  native  of  Nor- 
way. They  have  ten  children:  Peter,  Lily,  ^Nlaiy,  John, 
Oscar,  Gundy,  Jennie,  Andrew,  Nora  and  Elva. 

r\  NDEKSON,  HANS,  brother  of  Peter,  was  born  in 
H  Norway  March  30,  18r)L  He  came  to  Utah  in  1875, 
'  located  at  Fairview  and  worked  around  tlu^  mining 

camps  till  '83,  when  he  settled  at  Oak  Creek,  where  he 
has  forty  acres  of  land.  Is  a.  member  of  the  quorum  of 
Seventies  and  counsellor  to  the  president  of  the  Y.  M.  M. 
I.  A.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  October  11,  1883, 
to  Katrina  E.  Neilson,  born  in  Sweden.  They  have  four 
children:    Hans  L.,  Levi  A.,  Wallace  S.  and  Clara  L. 

BILLS  FKANKLIN  K.,  gardener,  son  of  John  and 
Sarah  E.,  was  born  in  Nauvoo,  Illinois,  May  22, 
1845.  The  family  came  to  Utah  when  he  was  small, 
father  went  to  California,  and  died.  ^Mother  married  again 
and  started  for  California,  but  died  on  the  road  from  the 
effect  of  an  accidental  gunshot  in  the  arm.  Franklin  and 
his  brothers  were  bound  out  to  other  families  who  came 
to  Utah  about  '60.  He  lived  in  Dixie  for  a  time,' then 
in  Beaver,  and  in  "60  came  to  Fairview,  where  he  owns 
a  small  place  and  garden.    In  '64  he  went  to  the  Missouri 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  361 

river  after  eiuigraiits.  Tctok  an  attive  part  iu  the  Black 
Hawk  war  as  a  iiiiiiuteiuan  and  interpreter,  liaving 
learned  the  Indian  langnage  when  a  boj'.  In  '74  he  was 
called  as  a  missionary  to  labor  among  the  Lamanites  at 
Indianola,  where  he  remained  one  3'ear,  and  is  said  to 
have  been  the  most  efficient  man  ever  sent  among  the 
Indians.  Through  his  eiforts  147  Indians  were  baptized. 
He  raised  the  tirst  crop  of  grain  at  Indianola.  He  has 
passed  through  many  hardships  and  dangers  among  the 
Indians  and  is  a  tyidcal  pioneer.  Was  married  in  Beaver 
November  3,  1863,  to  Nancy  A.  Davidson,  born  in  Nauvoo, 
Illinois,  June  26,  1846.  Thev  have  six  living  children: 
Nancv  E.,  Sarah  J.,  Franklin  R.,  John  C,  p]ffie  M.  and 
Ann  A. 

BILLS,  HON.  SAMUEL,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
John  and  Elizabeth  Scott,  was  born  in  Council 
Bluffs,  Iowa,  March  22,  1848.  His  parents  joined 
the  Mormon  church  and  in  '49  came  to  Utah,  locating 
ten  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake  City.  Soon  after  locating 
father  started  for  California  and  died  on  the  road  in  '50. 
Mother  married  and  removed  with  Samuel  to  California, 
where  she  died.  In  '58  he  came  to  Utah  with  David  H, 
Jones  and  family,  stop})ing  in  Mt.  Pleasant  in  '59,  in 
Fairview  in  '60,  then  to  St.  (leorge  in  '62  and  in  '65  re- 
turned to  Fairview.  In  '66  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river 
iifter  emigrants.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and 
was  in  two  or  three  skirmishes  Avitli  Indians.  He  pur- 
chased a  farm  and  now  owns  twenty-eight  acres  and  en- 
gaged in  farming,  stockraising  and  woolgrowing.  Was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  several  years  and  Mayor 
three  years.  In  '80  he  went  on  a  mission  of  one  year  to 
Georgia.  Is  one  of  the  bishop's  counsellors,  a  school 
trustee  and  an  active  worker  iu  educational  matters. 
A^'as  married  in  Fairview  September  12,  1867,  to  Ophelia 
A.,  daughter  of  Edmund  and  Sarah  Howell,  born  in 
Council"  Bluffs,  Iowa,  Januaiw  16,  1852.  They  have  had 
twelve  children:  Sarah  E.,  Samuel  D.,  John  E.,  Mary  E., 
Oelestia  O.,  Jordan  E.,  Martha  E.,  Charles  O.,  Annie  M. 
and  James  S.,  living;  William  (1.  and  Hazel  M.,  deceased. 


362  HISTORY    01    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

BRADY,  WARREN  P.,  farmer,  son  of  Lindsay  A.  and 
Elizabeth  Hendrickson,  was  born  in  Calloway 
county,  Kentucky,  December  30,  1836.  His  parents 
joined  the  Mormon  church  about  '34,  and  when  War- 
ren was  a  child  removed  to  Missouri  and  passed  through 
all  the  persecutions  of  the  Moi-mons  in  Missouri  and 
Illinois.  In  '50  they  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
in  Capt.  Warren  Foster's  train,  and  located  at  Union, 
twelve  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake  City.  Father  was  a 
prominent  man  in  church  matters.  In  April,  1859,  War- 
r<'n  and  family  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  being  the 
fifth  wagon  on  the  ground.  The  next  fall  he  took  up 
twenty  acres  of  land  near  Fairview,  and  in  '60  built  a 
l«ig  house.  He  wrote  Brigham  Young,  making  applica- 
tion to  settle  Fairview,  and  was  one  of  the  first  of  five 
to  arrive  here  on  March  17.  They  had  built  the  fort  and 
lived  in  it  for  a  time.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war  and  was  in  many  excursions  against  the  Indians. 
Served  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  for  many  years. 
Was  married  in  Liuion  Fort,  May  6,  1856,  to  Rachel, 
daughter  of  Jehu  and  Sarah  Cox,  born  in  Missouri  March 
27,  1836.  They  have  had  fifteen  children,  eleven  living: 
liosannah,  Simeon,  Rachael  A.,  Sarah  J.,  Marion,  Lind- 
^ey,  Elias,  Heber,  Martha,  IMarilla  and  Perry. 


BRADY,  JORDAN,  son  of  Lindsey  A.  and  Elizabeth 
A.,  was  born  in  Nauvoo,  Hancock  county,  Illinois, 
June  7,  1843.  Father  was  a  prominent  church  man 
and  helped  build  the  Nauvoo  Temple.  In  1850  the  fam- 
ily came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox  train,  un- 
der Capt.  Warren  Foote,  and  located  at  Union  Fort,  Salt 
Lake  county,  till  '59,  when  they  came  to  Fairview. 
Father  took  part  in  both  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk 
wars  as  a  home  guard  and  performed  a.  mission  to  the 
Southei*n  States.  He  died  in  '85.  Jordan  took  an  ac- 
tive part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in  the  engage- 
ment at  Fish  Lalce.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
for  two  years  and  served  as  Assessor  and  Collector.  Is 
Second  counsellor  to  Bishop  Peterson.  Was  ordained  a 
Patriarch  on  June  18,  1893,  by  Apostle  F.  M.  Lvman.    In 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  863 

'66  lie  went  ou  a  mission  to  the  Missouri  river  after 
^mijirants.  In  '96  lie  was  appointed  Superintendent  of 
the  County  poor  farm,  which  position  he  still  holds,  be- 
ing satisfactoiw  to  all  concerned.  He  is  a  stockholder  in 
the  Gooseberry  and  Cottonwood  Reseawoir  company,  and 
a  prominent  and  representative  man.  Was  married  in 
Fairview,  December  10,  1861,  to  Mary  L.,  daughter  of 
Edmond  W.  and  Sarah  Howell,  born  in  New  York  State, 
November  27,  1811.  She  came  to  Utah  in  '52  and  to 
Fairview  in  '60.  They  have  had  thirteen  children,  Jor- 
dan H.,  Keziah  L.,  Lindsey  E.,  Martha  E.,  Mary  E.,  Wil- 
lis A.,  Sarah  IM.,  Ada  C,  Eadna  A.,  Warren  A.,  Ophelia 
^.,  Millie  R.,  living,  and  Samuel  J.,  deceased. 

/QARLSTON,  JOSEPH  C,  railroader,  son  of  Hans  and 
\  ^Margai-et,  was  born  in  Fairview,  May  11,  1861.  He 
was  raised  here  and  engaged  in  mining  for  some 
years.  Is  at  j>resent  engaged  with  the  Rio  Grande  West- 
ern Railway  company,  in  which  position  he  has  worked 
for  several  years.  Is  a  member  of  the  Y.  M.  ^1.  I.  A.  and 
an  honest,  industrious  and  representative  young  man. 
Was  married  in  Logan  Temple,  October  2,  1885,  to  Han- 
rali,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Mary  Wilcox,  born  in 
Mt.  Pleasant,  April  13,  1868.  They  have  four  chil- 
ilren,  Joseph  Delos,  Hamnah  C,  Edna  M.  and  Ralph  C. 

IQARLSTON,  HENRY  J.,  miner,  son  of  Hans  and  Es- 
V  ther  L.,  was  bom  in  Fairview,  April  4,  1861.  He 
was  raised  here  and  received  his  education  from 
the  common  schools.  Has  been  instrumental  in  sinking 
most  of  the  wells  in  Fairview.  Served  as  a  Sunday-school 
teacher  three  years  and  ward  teacher  in  the  lesser  priest- 
hood live  years.  Has  acted  as  missionaiy  for  the  Y.  M. 
M.  I.  A.  and  is  an  earnest  church  worker.  Is  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Sanpitch  Ditch  company  and  during  the 
past  three  years  has  been  engaged  as  a  butcher.  Was 
married  in  the  Logan  Temple,  January  20,  1888,  to  Ida 
C,  daughter  of  John  F.  Fechser  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  born 
October  26,  1869.  They  have  two  living  children,  Ida  B. 
iind  Sarah  L. 


364  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

0  HRISTENSEN,  JOHN  W.,  manufacturer  and  dealer 
V^  in  lumber,  son  of  Frederick  and  Sophia,  was  born 
in  St.  Thomas,  Lincoln  county,  Nevada,  July  20, 
1867.  The  family  came  to  Fairview  when  he  was  small 
and  have  resided  here  siuce,  father  being  a  photographer. 
John  was  raised  here  and  has  followed  the  lumber  busi- 
ness, has  a  portable  mill  and  saws  lumber  in  the  canyon®. 
AYas  mamed  in  Logan  Temple,  April  20,  1887,  to  Laura, 
daughter  of  Heniy  and  Sarah  J.  Sanderson,  born  in  Fair- 
view,  March  7,  1869.  They  have  had  five  children,  Wil- 
liam, Lee  E.,  Aaron  and  Harold  living;  Laura,  decea,sed. 

/QLEMENT,  DAEIUS  S.,  gardener  and  fruitgrower, 
\  son  of  Thomas  and  Betsej^,  was  born  in  New  York, 
November  21,  1831.  He  came  West  and  was  bap- 
tized into  the  Mormon  church  at  Council  Bluff's,  Iowa,  in 
"16,  coming  to  Utah  in  '48  in  President  Brigham 
Young's  company.  He  located  in  Salt  Lake  county  and 
resided  there  for  about  fourteen  years,  when  he  went  to 
St.  George  and  remained  about  six  yea.rs,  then  came  to 
Fairvie^'^,  where  he  has  since  resided.  He  was  the  Fair- 
view  miller  for  eight  yeairs  and  is  now  engaged  in  garden- 
irg  and  fruitgro^^ing,  having  a  beautiful  place,  made  so 
through  hard  labor  and  perseverance,  for  which  he  is 
noted.  In  '62  lie  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emi- 
grants. He  is  an  energetic  worker,  a  thoroughly  reliable 
man,  and  a  much  respected  citizen  of  Fairview.  Was 
married  at  Union  Fort,  Salt  Lake  county,  November  27, 
1859,  to  Louisa,  daughter  of  Easton  and  Abigail  Kelsey, 
born  August  9,  1844.  They  have  liad  ten  children,  Dar- 
ius A.,  Easton,  Oliver,  Nancy  A.,  Jesse  W.,  Orin  F.,  Amo» 
B.,  Thomas  A.  and  Clarence,  living;  Elizabeth,  deceased. 

/^OX,  AMASA  B.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of  Or- 
\  ville  S.  and  Elvira  P.  Mills,  was  bom  in  Manti, 
March  25,  1861.  His  father  was  a  native  of  New 
York,  mother  native  of  Ohio.  They  came  to  Utah  in  '47 
in  Capt.  Charles  Eich's  company,  father  being  Captain 
ef  a  ten  and  mother  driving  a  team.  First  settled  at 
Sessions,  and  in  the  fall  of  '49  removed  to  Manti  and 
camped  under  the  quarr\^     Father  took  part  in  the  In- 


SWEN     O.     NIKLSON, 
FAIRVIF.W. 


JOHN    A.    WALKER, 
FAIRVIEW. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  365 

clian  wars  and  assisted  in  settling  seveiral  places  in  Utali. 
He  was  among  the  early  settlers  of  Fairsiew,  and  died 
Lere  July  4,  1888.  He  had  three  families.  Amasa's 
mother  still  lives  with  him,  being  78  years  of  age.  He 
came  in  '62  with  the  family  to  Fairview  and  grew  up 
here.  Herded  cattle  from  the  time  he  was  13  till  21 
years  of  age,  then  bought  a  farm.  Now  owns  thirty-five 
acres  and  a  good  dairy.  Is  a  director  in  the  GoosebeiTy 
and  Cottonwood  IiT-igation  company,  and  creamery,  and 
a  member  of  the  City  Council.  Was  mari'ied  in  Manti 
Temple,  November  12,  1890,  to  Annie  C,  daughter  of 
Charles  K.  and  Caroline  Hansen,  born  in  Fairview,  Oc- 
tober 21,  1872.  They  have  four  children,  Amasa  I., 
Charles  E.,  Newell  B.,  Harold  A.  and  Eoscoe  C. 


/J)  OX,  ORYILLE,  farmer,  son  of  Oiwille  and  Elvira, 
\  was  born  in  Sessions  settlement.  Salt  Lake  county, 
November  29,  1847.  His  parents  removed  to  Manti 
ill  '49,  among  the  first  settlers  in  the  county,  and  lived 
under  the  quarry.  In  '62  mother  and  family  came  to 
Fairview,  where  father  had  built  a  house  in  '61.  They 
have  resided  here  ever  since,  except  two  years.  Orville 
took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  doing  guard  duty.  He 
has  thirty  acres  of  land  one  and  one-half  miles  northeast 
of  Fairview.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  August  10,  1875, 
to  Eosannah,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Rosannah 
Jones,  born  July  10,  1857.  They  have  five  children,  Ida 
L.,  Roy  B.,  Orville  M.,  Tern  and  Bessie. 


/QRUSER,  ANNIE  E.,  daughter  of  Christian  and  Chris- 
V^  tine  Peterson,  was  born  in  Mount  Pleasant,  Feb- 
ruary 7,  1868.  She  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
September  25, 1884,  to  Christian  Cruser.  He  was  a  prom- 
inent man  in  church  and  political  affairs.  Ser^-ed  as  pres- 
ident of  the  Elders'  quorum  and  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  and  a. 
M  ard  teacher.  Was  also  City  Treasurer  for  one  term. 
He  was  born  in  Fairview,  May  9,  1863,  and  died  here  No- 
vember 18,  1892,  leaving  her  ^^ith  two  children,  Francis. 
L.  and  Laura  H. 

12 


366  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

DAY,  ELI  A.,  teacbeop  audi  farmer,  son  of  Abraham 
and  Charlotte  K.,  was  born  in  Spi-ingville,  Utah, 
September  23,  1856.  In  February,  '60,  the  family 
removed  to  Mount  Pleasant,  where  father  was  quite  a 
prominent  man,  being  Mayor,  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil, City  Attorney,  and  interested  in  some  of  the  flouring 
and  sawmills  and  other  industries.  He  was  a  genius  and 
built  probably  the  lirst  threshing  machine  in  Mt. 
Pleasant.  He  now  resides  in  Emery  county.  Mother 
died  in  '72.  Eli  was  raised  in  Mt.  Pleasant  to  farming 
and  general  work.  Attended  the  district  schools  till  18 
years  old,  when  he  entered  the  Nonnal  department  of 
the  Deseret  university  and  graduated.  Taught  school  in 
Mt.  Pleasant  for  seven  years,  being  principal  six 
years.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council,  active  in  the 
Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.,  and  superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school 
two  years.  In  '83  he  eame  to  Fairvdew  and  was  prin- 
cipal of  the  schools  five  years.  Was  principal  of  the 
Emery  Stake  academy  in  '90  and  '91.  Like  many  others 
he  entered  into  polygamy  and  served  five  months  in  the 
penitentiary^,  being  the  youngest  man  in  that  institu- 
tion. Is  at  present  principal  of  the  Milbum  schools.  Is 
City  Justice  and  carries  on  a  small  farm.  Is  a  member 
of  the  Council  of  the  Twenty-sixtli  Quorum  of  Seventies 
and  first  assistant  su])eiinten(lont  of  Sunday  schools.  Is 
a  teacher  of  vocal  and  instrumental  music,  manager  of 
the  Home  Dramatic  company,  and  was  eight  years  a 
<'hoir  leader.  Was  married  in  St.  George  Temple,  June 
.19,  1878,  to  Eliza  J.,  daughter  of  Nathan  and  Eliza 
Staker,  born  in  Mt.  IMeasant.  They  have  eight  chil- 
dren: Eliza  E.,  Sarah  E.,  Martha  U.,  Dora  P.,  Eli  A. 
Joseph  S.,  Eoenna  M.,  Alvin  D.  Second  wife  married 
July  2,  1884,  was  Elvira  E.,  daughter  of  Orville  S.  and 
Elvira  P.  Cox,  born  in  Fairview.  She  has  four  children, 
Orville  C,  Abraham  E.,  Eye  E.  and  Ellen  H. 

FOWLES,  HENEY,  farmer,  son  of  Timothy  and  Eliza, 
was  born  in  Westershire,  England,  October  18, 
1811.  He  worked  in  an  iron  mill  several  years, 
and  in  '63  came  to  Utah,  driving  four  yoke  of  oxen 
across  the  plains  in  Capt.  White's  company.     Eeached 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  367 

Salt  Lake  City  October  18tb,  without  any  money,  and 
soon  located  in  Moroni.  In  'G7  he  came  to  Fairview, 
farmed  on  shares  for  a  time  and  bought  ten  acres,  now 
owns  100  acres  of  land.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war.  Worked  one  year  on  the  St.  George  Temple.  In  'SI 
he  was  sent  to  St.  John,  Arizona,  to  assist  in  settling 
that  country,  and  was  a  contractor,  merchant  and  farmer 
several  years.  Returned  to  Fainiew,  but  soon  went  back 
to  Arizona,  where  he  was  president  of  the  Co-op  store  for 
several  years.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store,  sheep 
herd  and  flour  mills  and  a  representative  citizen.  Was 
married  Februaiy  20,  1866,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of 
Eichard  and  Mary  Graham.  She  died  in  Arizona  Novem- 
ber 3,  1887,  and  he  married  in  Logan  April  19,  1888,  to 
Sarah  E.,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Charlotte  Bushman, 
born  in  Lehi,  Utah,  March  17, 1869.  They  have  had  three 
children:  Jacob  T.  and  Ruby  R.,  living;  Henry  H.,  de- 
ceased. 

FRIES,  HYRUM  DE,  superintendent  of  the  Co-op 
store,  son  of  John  and  Halemankua,  was  bora  on 
the  island  of  Kawaii,  of  the  Hawaiian  group,  April 
1,  1865.  His  parents  had  joined  the  ]\Ioi*mon  cliurch 
about  '55  and  father  was  a  rice  planter.  In  '72  father 
and  son  came  to  Utah  and  in  '73  located  in  Fairview, 
where  father  engageil  as  a  car-penter  and  undertaker, 
but  has  recently  retired.  In  '77  Hyrum  engaged  as 
clerk  in  the  store  for  Peter  Sundwall,  and  in  '96  became 
the  manager  of  the  Co-op  store.  They  cany  a  |14,000 
stock  of  general  merchandise  and  do  a  large  business. 
The  company  also  owns  two  sawmills,  has  some  sheep 
and  an  interest  in  the  Union  Roller  Mills.  He  owns  a 
one-third  interest  in  the  Eclipse  pavilion,  being  a  direc- 
tor in  the  company;  is  secretaiy  and  treasurer  in  the 
Social  Hall  Comi)any;  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
Cottonwood  In'igation  Company;  a  stockholder  in  the 
Gooseberr^^  Irrigation  Company  and  vice-president  of  the 
Union  Roller  Mills  Company.  Is  City  Justice  and  City 
Recorder.  Is  an  active  worker  in  church  and  Sunday- 
school  and  has  performed  a  three  years'  mission  to  the 


368  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Hawaiian  Islands,  Was  married  in  Fairview  March  24, 
1885,  to  Annie,  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Sarah  Nielson, 
born  in  Fairview  Januarj^  11,  1867.  They  have  had  six 
childi-en:  Hallie  G.,  Sarah  H.,  Vera  and  Hyrum  L.,  liv- 
ing; Hyriim  11.  and  Andrew,  deceased. 

If  ANSEN,  CHARLES  K.,  farmer,  a  prominent  citizen, 
fl  son  of  Peter  and  Christiana  Lanstriip,  was  bom  in 
J  l^rederickhaven,  Denmark,  September  15,  1833.  He 
learned  the  trade  of  a  shoemaker  from  his  father,  joined 
the  Mormon  church  in  '61  and  for  six  years  was  a  travel- 
ing elder,  the  last  two  years  he  presided  over  the  branch 
at  Aarhus.  In  '67  he  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train  as  teamster  under  Capt.  Eice  and  located 
in  Fairview  in  the  fort.  The  folloAving  year  he  removed 
to  his  present  residence.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war  and  worked  at  his  trade  until  he  purchased  a  small 
farm;  now  owns  twenty-seven  acres.  Served  as  City 
Treasurer,  school  trustee  and  first  assistant,  superinten- 
dent and  secretary  of  the  Sunday-school.  In  '87  he  went 
on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Denmai-k  and  presided  over 
the  Aalborg  conference.  He  was  clerk  of  the  Co-op  store 
tv\^o  and  a  half  years,  and  secretary  of  the  United  Order, 
then  opened  a  general  store  under  the  name  of  C.  K. 
Hansen  &  Co.,  which  he  sold  and  returned  to  his  trade 
and  farming.  Is  now  president  of  the  High  Priests, 
clerk  of  the  ward  and  a  leader  in  educational  and  Sun- 
day-school matters.  Is  a  stockhohler  in  the  Co-op  Sheep 
Company.  Was  married  in  Denmark  December  14,  1860, 
to  Caroline  M.  Anderson,  who  died  in  crossing  the  plains 
in  '64.  Married  again  April  7,  1867,  to  Caroline,  daugh- 
ter of  Easmus  and  Anna  Easmussen,  born  in  Denmark 
March  15,  1842.  They  have  ten  children:  Charles,  Jo- 
seph, Hyrum,  Caroline,  Oscar,  Herbert,  Orson  P.,  Lewis 
W.,  Hannah  C.  and  George  A. 

II  AXSEX,  PETEE  X.,  deceased,  son  of  Niels  and  In- 
jj  gree,  was  born  in  Denmark  June  9,  1833.  The  fam- 
'  ily  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  he  and  his 
mother  with  four  sisters  started  for  Utah  in  '56.  They 
traveled  from  Iowa  to  Florence,  Neb., — 300  miles — with 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  369 

handcarts,  and  mother  and  one  sister  died.  In  '57  they 
came  to  Utah,  resided  awhile  in  Salt  Lake  City  and  in 
'58  located  in  Ephraim.  He  came  to  Fairview  in  '60  and 
assisted  in  building  the  fort.  Took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war.  Bought  a  farm  and  engaged  in  farming. 
Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council,  director  in  the  Co-op 
store  and  took  an  .active  part  in  church  and  school  mat- 
ters. He  died  in  Fairview  February  14,  1895.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Fairview  October  5,  1862,  to  Maria  Hendrickson, 
born  in  Denmark  March  15,  1830.  They  had  nine  chil- 
dren: Mary,  Peter  H.,  Emma,  Ann  E.,  James  E.,  Nelson 
and  Ingree  ]M.,  living;  Joseph  and  Celestia,  deceased. 

11  ANSEN,  NILS,  blacksmith  and  farmer,  son  of  Isaac 
jj  and  Inger,  was  born  in  Sweden,  November  30,  1858. 
'  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  his  native  land 
and  came  to  Utah  in  '84,  locating  in  South  Cottonwood, 
where  he  remained  six  years,  then  came  to  Faii'view. 
He  served  as  registration  officer  for  Precinct  No.  2  in 
'97.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Fair-view  Creamery  and  a 
representative  young  man.  In  church  matters  he  takes 
a  leading  part,  being  head  teacher  and  a  member  of  the 
Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  Was  married  in  Logan  Temple,  July  11, 
1888,  to  Augusta,  daughter  of  Carl  and  Christina  Ander- 
son, born  April  1,  1871.  They  have  five  children,  Inge- 
barg  E.  C,  Esther  V.,  Buth  O.,  Isaac  A.  and  Nils  R. 

11  ABTLEY,  CALEB  T.,  fanner,  son  of  Caleb  C.  and 
ji  Mar\',  was  born  -in  Oxfordshire,  England,  March 
'  19,  1841.  His  mother,  two  brothers  and  sister  died 
at  Atchison,  Kan.,  in  '55,  while  en  route  to  Utah,  leav- 
ing him  alone.  He  came  to  Utah  in  Capt.  Isaac  Allred's 
church  train,  living  in  Ogden,  Pleasant  Grove  and  other 
places  till  '59,  when  he  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  and 
engaged  in  freighting  produce  to^  the  mining  camps  of 
Utah  and  Montana.  In  '63  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river 
after  emigrants.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  as 
a  minuteman.  In  '72  he  located  in  Fairview,  remaining 
there  till  the  spring  of  '75,  when  he  took  up  eighty  acres 
cf  land  at  Oak  Creek.  Now  owns  240  acres  and  is  en- 
gaged in  general  farming.     Was  married  in  Fairview, 


370  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

November  24,  1873,  to  Glmstina,  daughter  of  Andrew 
and  Anna  Petei-son,  bom  in  Salt  Lake  City,  September 
15,  1855.  Her  parents  came  to  Utali  in  '54,  located  in 
Ephraim  in  '59,  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant  among  the 
first  settlers.  In  '60  they  settled  in  Faii^view,  where 
father  died,  January  20,  1873.  Mother  still  living.  They 
have  eleven  children,  Marj^,  Lutisha,  Andrew  T.,  Caleb 
C,  Anna  M.,  Sylvia,  Urbon,  Minerva,  Peter,  Isabella 
aid  Dosena. 

n  DWELL,  ELIAS  W.,  of  the  finn  of  Terrj-  &  Howell 
M  Planing  Mill  company,  is  a  prominent  citizen,  son 
/  of  Edmund  W.  and  Sarah  Vail,  was  bom  on  Long 
Island,  N.  Y.,  April  29,  1836.  His  father  was  a  shoe- 
maker and  joined  the  Mormon  church  about  '40,  removed 
to  New  York  City  in  '43,  to  St.  Louis  in  '46,  then  to  Win- 
ter Quarters,  and  in  '52  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train  under  Capt.  Wood.  Father  and  one  daugh- 
ter died  on  the  plains  from  cholera.  The  family  located 
in  Little  Cottonwood,  then  in  Ogden,  and  in  '62  came  to 
lairview.  Tliey  lived  in  the  fort  for  a  time.  Elias  took 
pc.rt  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Bought  twenty  acres  of 
land  and  now  owns  fifty-five  acres.  Is  a  leader  in  public 
enterprises,  being  a  stockholder  and  vice  president  in 
tbe  Co-op.  sheep  herd,  Co-op.  stoie  and  president  of  the 
T  nion  roller  mill  and  the  Cottonwood  Irrigation  com- 
pany, and  a  stockhokler  in  the  creamerN^  and  business 
Ti  anager  of  the  Eclipse  Pavilion  company.  Was  a  mem- 
ler  of  the  City  Council  one  tei-m  and  served  as  City  In- 
spector. He  first  manned  in  Salt  Lake  City  Februar->% 
1858,  to  Martha  J.  Rigby.  She  had  four  children,  Sarah 
L.,  Martha  A.,  I^osalie  F.  and  Drusilla.  Second  wife  was 
j\fary  J.,  daughter  of  Henry  W.  and  Bebecca  A.  Sander- 
son, born  in  Salt  Lake  county  April  17,  1872.  They  have 
had  twelve  children,  MaiT  M.,  Willis  H.,  Sarah  B.,  Ed- 
mend  S.,  Chancy  V.,  Ada  S.,  Clydia  A.,  Junius  F.,  Delora, 
Ira  V.  and  Bertha  M.,  living;  Art-emesia,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  P.  C,  JR.,  lumber  dealer,  son  of  Peter  C.  and 
Mary,  was  bom  in  Ephraim,  March  18,  1858.     The 
family  removed  to    Mt.    Pleasant,    then    to    Bich- 
fi(-ld,  and  when  he  was  about  10  vears  old  came  to  Fair- 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  371 

view,  where  he  has  since  resided.  He  was  engaged  about 
two  years  in  the  mercantile  business  with  E.  W.  Howell 
and  E.  L.  TeriT,  and  thej  now  own  and  operate  a  saw- 
mill. He  owns  a  portable  mill  and  has  a  farm  of  ninety 
acres  near  Milburn.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
April  3,  1878,  to  Martha  A.,  daughter  of  Elias  W.  and 
Martha  J.  Howell,  born  at  Union  Fort,  Salt  Lake  county, 
December  31,  18(51.  They  have  had  nine  children,  Mar- 
tha L.,  Chiistian  E.,  James  L.,  Heber,  Ellis  G.  and  Le- 
vem,  liying;  Maiy  S.,  Otis  A.  and  Ethel  C,  deceased. 

JONES,  JACOB,  farmer,  sou  of  James  N.  and  Sarah  A., 
was  born  in  Morgan  county,  Ohio,  April  2G,  1835. 
The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  Nauvoo, 
vvhere  Jacob  was  baptized.  In  '49  they  crossed  the  plains 
in  an  ox-tiain  under  Capt.  A.  Johnson,  father  being  cap- 
tain of  a  ten,  reaching  Salt  Lake  City  in  August.  They 
remained  in  Salt  Lake  City  two  years,  then  removed  to 
Provo.  Father  was  sent  with  others  to  look  over  the 
site  for  Fairview  and  he  selected  their  present  location. 
They  camped  in  Mt.  Pleasant  and  built  the  fort  in 
Fairview.  He  was  Bishop  a  number  of  years  and  a 
leading  man  in  the  town.  Parents  both  died  here.  Jacob*- 
took  an  active  part  in  the  Indian  wars.  Was  a  Lieuten- 
ant in  the  Walker  and  Tintic  wars,  and  an  interpi'eter 
and  scout  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  He  has  always  fol- 
lowed farming  and,  in  company  with  his  two  sons,  owns 
a  360-acre  stock  range  in  Wyoming.  Was  married  in 
Fairview  to  Emma,  daughter  of  Jehu  and  Sarah  Oox, 
bom  in  Nauvoo,  111.,  May,  1845.  They  have  eight  chil- 
dren,'James  T.,  Mary  J.,  Lydia,  Elizabeth,  Cornelia  M., 
Jehu,  Lucretia  and  Alvaretta. 

LASSON,  ANDKE^^  ,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Ole  and  Sissa,  was  born  in  Sweden,  October  23, 
1843.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  his  native  coun- 
try and  in  May,  '65,  came  to  Utah,  driving  a  merchandise 
team  across  the  plains.  On  Christmas  day,  '65,  he 
reached  Fairview,  having  no  money  or  property.  He 
went  to  work  and  in  '76  took  up  160  acres  of  land  at  Oak' 
Creek,  four  miles  north  of  Fairvit^w,  where  he  now  re- 


372  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

sides.  Now  owns  550  acres  and  is  a  very  prominent 
farmer  and  stockraiser,  and  a  representative  citizen.  Has 
imported  numerous  thoroughbred  stock  and  is  exensively 
interested  in  Durham  and  Herefords.  Is  director  in  the 
Fairview  Co-op,  store  and  creamery.  He  may  well  be 
designated  as  a  self-made  man  and  a  thorough  farmer 
and  financier.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  June  3,  1878, 
to  Albertina,  daughter  of  Andrew^  and  Louesa  C.  Ander- 
son, born  in  Sweden,  November  13,  1857.  They  have  had 
ten  children,  Nellie,  Selna,  Emily,  Agnes,  Mabel,  Cleone 
L.  and  Olista  R.,  living;  Bernhardina,  Priscilla  L.  and 
Ellna  A.,  deceased. 


AY^  INEE,  MOKMON,  fanner  and  stockraiser,  son  of  | 
I  1  I  Albert  and  Tama  Durfee,  was  born  in  Kirtland,  J 
I  I  Ohio,  September  26,  1837.  The  family  were  | 
from  New  York  of  English  descent.     They  joined  the  I 

Mormon  church  in  '32  and  passed  through  all  the  per-  < 

secutions  in  Ohio,  Illinois,  Missouri  and  Iowa,  where 
father  died  in  January-,  '48.  In  '50  mother  and  six  chil- 
dren started  for  Utah  with  two  yoke  of  oxen  and  two 
"'yoke  of  cows,  all  on  one  wagon.  They  reached  Salt  Lake 
City  in  October  and  located  in  Springville,  where  mother 
married  again.  Mormon  and  his  brother  came  to  Fair- 
view  in  '60  and  assisted  in  building  the  fort.  They 
brought  thirty  head  of  stock  with  them.  Mormon 
bought  twenty  acres  of  land  and  now  owns  120  acres, 
which  he  and  his  sons  successfully  handle  with  consid- 
erable stock,  mostly  Durham.  He  assisted  in  organiz- 
ing and  establishing  many  of  the  local  enterprises.  Was 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  ten  years.  Is  one  of  the 
Presidents  of  the  Twenty-sixth  Quorum  of  Seventies.  In 
'63  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  the  Northwest- 
ern States.  Was  married  in  Springville,  February  24, 
1861,  to  Emeline  P.,  daughter  of  Uriah  and  Phoebe  Cur- 
lis,  born  in  Hancock  county.  111.,  December  6,  1844.  T'he\' 
have  had  thirteen  children,  Martin  M.,  Albert,  U.,  Mary 
I^,  Melvin  O.,  Homer  F.,  Ernest  L.,  George  D.,  Lester 
and  Louie  M.,  living;  Erastus,  Phoebe,  Loretta  and  Lee 
!{.,  deceased. 


AlOllAIUN     MlNKIl 
FAIRVIEW. 


JOSEPH   N.    SEKl.Y. 
FArRVJP:VV. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  373 

rniNETI,  ALBERT  U.,  principal  of  tlie  Fairview 
I  I  I  schools,  son  of  Mormon  and  Emeline  P.,  was 
f  y  born  in  Fairview  August  10,  18C5.  He  attended 
tlie  schools  of  I'^airview  and  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo 
for  a  time.  Taught  school  in  Spring  City  one  year,  then 
in  this  city  one  year,  and  in  '97  was  made  principal  over 
the  six  schools  of  this  district.  In  July,  1891,  he  went  on 
a  mission,  laboring  in  the  Pennsylvania  conference,  and 
for  one  year  presided  over  that  conference  and  a  branch 
of  the  church.  Eeturned  in  November,  1893.  He  is  sec- 
retary of  the  T'wenty-sixth  quorum  of  Seventies.  Is  inter- 
ested with  his  father  in  stockraising.  Was  married  in 
Logan  Temple  November  10,  1886,  to  Maria,  daughter  of 
Archibald  and  Sarah  J.  Anderson.  Wife  died  December 
16,  1888.  Married  again  in  Manti  Temple  June  23,  1897, 
to  Estella,  daughter  of  Eli  A.  and  Eliza  J.  Staker  Day, 
born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  April  29,  1879. 

rY\  INER,  ALMA  L.,  farmer,  son  of  Albert  and  Tama 
/  I  I  Durfee,  was  born  in  Hancock  county.  111.,  Sep- 
'  I  tember  7,  1841.  In  '50  the  family  came  to  Utah 
and  settled  in  Springville.  Alma  removed  to  Fairview  in 
'65,  bought  a  twenty-acre  farm  and  now  has  a  nice  farm 
of  100  acres.  In  '63  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after 
emigrants  and  in  '66  went  to  St.  Joe,  Mo.,  for  a  threshing 
machine,  which  he  hauled  to  Springville,  having  five  yoke 
of  oxen  and  being  five  months  in  making  the  trip.  Is  a 
stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store  and  a  director  in  the  Co-op 
sheep  herd  and  flouring  mills.  Was  married  in  Spring- 
ville March  26,  1868,  to  Caroline,  daughter  of  Andrew 
and  Sarah  Neilson,  born  in  Denmark  elanuary  27,  1852. 
They  have  twelve  children:  Alma  H.,  Inez  M.,  Orson  A., 
Effie  A.,  Emma  A.,  Andrew  C,  Nellie  M.,  Gilbert  L.,  Don 
C,  Sarah  J.,  Edna  I.  and  Ivie  C. 

rnoWER,  HENRY,  son  of  Henry  and  Mary,  was 
I  1  I  born  in  Bedford  county,  Pennsylvania,  November 
'  V  22,  1824.  His  parents  joined  the  Mormon  church 
among  the  early  members  and  were  in  the  trials  and 
persecutions  in  Illinois.  In  '38  they  removed  to  Spring- 
field, remaining  two  years,  then  to  Nauvoo,  111.     Henry 


374  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

was  married  first  in  Nauvoo,  and  in  '47  started  for  Utah, 
\Tith  no  outfit,  and  had  to  remain  at  Kanesville  two 
years.  In  the  spring  of  '49  he  started  for  Utah  with  tAvo 
yoke  of  cattle  and  a  cow,  in  Capt.  Silas  Eichards'  com- 
pany, arrived  in  Salt  Lake  City  in  November  and  lo- 
cated. He  conducted  a  hotel  and  sold  provisions  to  Cal- 
ifornia emigrants  till  '51,  when  he  removed  to  Union 
Fort.  In  '54  he  moved  to  Springville,  where  he  ran  the 
first  threshing  machine  He  came  to  Fairview  in  '62, 
took  part  in  the  Black  Hawiv  war,  and  has  been  in  the 
employ  of  the  Government  almost  all  the  time,  carrying 
the  mail.  Every  traveler  in  Sanpete  is  familiar  with 
"Uncle  Henry."  He  works  a  small  farm.  Has  had  six 
wives  and  sei'ved  a  short  tenn  in  the  penitentiary  for 
polygamy.  The  wife  with  whom  he  is  now  living  was 
Kuvina  Siler  nee  Mount,  born  in  Erie  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, May  14,  1834.  They  have  four  living  children, 
Cynthia  M.,  Amasa  N.,  Lula  A.  and  Lydia  M.  She  had 
two  children  by  first  marriage,  Samuel  H.  and  Hiram  B. 

rr\  OWER,  SARAH  M.,  daughter  of  Lindsey  A.  and 
/  I  I  Elizabeth  Ann  Brad}^,  was  born  in  Union  Fort, 
/  V  Salt  Lake  county,  Utah,  November  30,  1852.  She 
was  married  in  the  Endowment  House,  Salt  Lake  City, 
in  1867,  to  John  A.,  son  of  Henry  and  Susan  Mower,  born 
August  3,  1851.  He  was  a  prominent  citizen  of  Fair- 
view  and  took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
losing  a  team  by  the  Indian  depredations.  Served  as 
road  supervisor  for  a  number  of  years.  Was  president 
of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  and  superintendent  of  the  Sunday- 
school,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death,  June  30,  1894,  was 
president  of  the  Seventies'  quorum.  He  owned  a  far-m 
of  fifty  acres;  was  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store  and 
grist  mill,  and  an  earnest  worker  and  much  respected 
citizen.  There  are  ten  children  living,  John  W.,  Susan 
M.,  Marion  H.,  Jordan,  Mary  E.,  James  A.,  Martha  C, 
Sarah  M.,  Milla  T.  and  Rosalie. 

/Y^  OWER,  JOHN  L.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
ill  Henry  and  Elizabeth,  was  born  in  Springville, 
'  y  Utah,  January  9,  1859.  The  family  removed  to 
Fairview  w^hen  he  w^as  a  child  and  he  was  brought  up 


HISTORY   OF  SANPETE   COUNTY.  375 

there  to  farm  work.  In  July,  1882,  he  located  at  Oak 
Liet'k,  where  be  has  190  acres  of  land  and  is  interested 
in  farming  and  stockiaisiug,  having  100  head  of  stock. 
He  also  buys  and  sells  stock  and  is  a  good,  substantial 
citizen.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  September  21,  1879, 
t''  Amelia  A.,  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Louesa  Ander- 
sen, born  in  Sweden,  April  4,  1864.  They  have  had  eight 
children,  John  L.,  Edna  B.,  Arthur  L.,  Maude  A.  and 
Alben  W.,  living;  Emily  A.,  Andi-ew  H.  and  William  L., 
deceased. 

nr\  OWEK,  GEOEGE  H.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son 
111  of  Henry  and  Elizabeth,  was  born  in  Little  Oot- 
'  \  tonwood.  Salt  Lake  county,  June  25,  1852.  The 
family  removed  to  Fairview  when  he  was  10  years  old 
and  he  was  raised  there.  He  worked  about  mining 
camps  for  a  time  after  becoming  a  man,  and  had  charge 
of  Neilson  Bros,  stock  farm  for  seven  years.  He  owns 
160  acres  of  land  north  of  Milbum  and  twelve  acres  at 
Oak  Creek,  where  he*  lives.  Is  engaged  in  farming  and 
raising  stock.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  July  15,  1873, 
to  Sariah  E.,  daughter  of  Nathaniel  and  Amanda  Stew- 
art, born  in  Provo.  They  have  five  children,  Amanda, 
George  H.,  Emma  J.,  Elva  M.  and  Delia  P. 

rn  OWEE,  CHAELES  A.,  farmer,  son  of  Henry  and 
ill  Alice,  was  bom  in  Springville,  Utah,  November 
'  '  10,  1859.  His  parents  removed  to  Fairview  when 
he  was  a  small  boy  and  he  was  raised  here.  After  grow- 
ing to  manhood  he  worked  about  the  mines  and  at  herd- 
ing stock.  In  '83  he  located  at  his  present  home,  three 
and  one-half  miles  north  of  Fairview,  at  Oak  Creek, 
where  he  owns  sixty  acres  of  land  and  is  engaged  in 
stockraising  and  farming.  Is  an  active  member  of  the 
Mormon  church  and  a  teacher  in  the  Sunday-school.  Waa 
married  in  Fairview,  December  6,  1880,  to  Henrietta, 
daughter  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Stewart,  born  in  Fair- 
view,  November  16,  1861.  They  have  had  seven  children, 
Charles  L.,  Alice  L.,  Mary  L.,  Hyrum  C,  James  H.  and 
Francis  M.,  living;  Leonard  E.,  deceased. 


376  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

k^IELSON,  SWEN  O.,  of  the  firm  of  Swen  &  Lars 
1)1  Nielson,  mercliants  and  farmers,  son  of  Ole  and 
I  Pernellie  Bomm,  was  born  in  Cliristianstade,  Swe- 
den, January  1,  1854.  In  '55  the  family  removed  to  Den- 
mark, where  at  the  age  of  7  Swen  began  working  in  a 
chicory  factory  at  3  cents  a  half  day,  attending  school 
the  other  half;  followed  that  work  till  '63,  when  he  and 
his  mother,  brother  and  sister  came  to  Utah,  stopping 
at  Mt.  Pleasant,  and  in  '67  located  in  Fairview.  Father 
came  in  '65  and  died  here  in  February,  1876.  Mother  is 
still  living.  Swen  worked  at  herding  and  farming  and 
attended  school  until  17,  when  he  went  to  Pioche,  Nev., 
and  engaged  in  driving  team  for  six  years.  He  returned 
to  Fairview,  took  up  160  acres  of  land,  now  he  and  his 
brother  Lars  have  1,200  acres,  with  fine  improvements. 
In  '79  he  and  his  brother  built  a  sawmill  in  Dry  Creek 
Canyon,  and  later  put  in  others,  which  they  operated  for 
ten  3'ears.  In  '85  they  opened  a  general  store  in  a  little 
adobe  building,  and  the  following  year  built  their  pres- 
ent one,  where  they  cany  a  stock  of  |12,000  to  |15,000, 
consisting  of  everything  usually  kept  in  a  first-class 
country  store.  They  buy  and  ship  sheep,  cattle  and  grain 
and  have  imported  Cotswold  sheep.  He  is  superintendent 
of  the  Fairview  Creamery  Company  and  member  of  the 
City  Council.  Is  a  member  of  the  Mormon  church  and 
has  performed  a  short  mission,  being  forced  to  return  on 
account  of  ill  health.  Is  a  Republican  and  chairaian  of 
the  county  committee  and  member  of  the  State  commit- 
tee. Served  as  chairman  of  the  County  Commissioners 
and  was  nominated  for  member  of  the  Legislature,  but 
the  ticket  Avas  defeated.  Was  mari'ied  in  St.  George 
February  14,  1878,  to  Rachael,  daughter  of  William  and 
Rachael  Atkin,  born  in  Salt  Lake  City  March  14,  1861. 
They  have  had  nine  children:  Swen  W.,  Annie  :N.,  Sarah 
L.,  Estella  M.,  Sina  C.  and  Peter  F.,  living;  Rachael  M., 
Ole  M.  and  Venice,  deceased. 

jy^IELSON,  LARS  P.,  of  the  firm  of  Swen  &  Lars  Niel- 
\\  son,  the  largest  landowners,  sheepraisers  and  busi- 
'  ness  men  in  northern  Sanpete,  son  of  Ole  and  Per- 
nellie, was  bom  in  Denmark  June  27,  1857.    He  came  to 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  377 

Utah  in  '63  with  his  mother  and  brother  Swen,  a  sister 
Sine  dying  in  Nebraska.  They  crossed  the  plains  in  a 
church  ox-train  under  Capt.  John  F.  Sanders,  the  boys 
walking  most  of  the  way,  reaching  Mt.  Pleasant  in  Sep- 
tember. Father  and  son  Peter  followed  in  '65.  Peter 
went  to  the  Missouri  river  in  '68  after  emigrants  and  was 
drowned  with  live  others  while  crossing  Green  river.  The 
family  was  in  debt  for  emigration  and  did  not  get  the 
debt  paid  until  '68.  In  *6T  they  removed  to  Fairview, 
where  father  died.  The  boys  grew  up  there  and  herded 
sheep  and  cattle  and  did  other  work  until  about  '74,  when 
they  went  to  Pioche,  Nevada,  and  engaged  in  hauling 
mine  timbers.  Lars  bought  four  yoke  of  oxen  and  two 
Avagons  on  time  and  paid  the  bill,  about  $600,  in  six 
months.  Swen  owned  a  team  and  in  this  w^ay  they  made 
a  start.  They  returned  and  each  filed  on  160  acres  of  land 
four  miles  north  of  Milburn.  They  now  own  1,200  acres, 
all  under  fence,  principally  in  hay  and  pasture,  with  good 
buildings  and  machineiw.  They  usually  have  about  4,000 
sheep  on  the  fann,  which  Lars  cares  for,  while  Swen 
manages  a  large  general  store  in  Fairview. 

lif  TELSEN,  AXDKEW,  fanner,  son  of  Mels  and  Karen 
1)1  Jolmnsen,  was  born  in  Denmark  January  1,  1827. 
i  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  bricklayer,  married  and 
joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '61,  and  for  seven  months 
presided  over  a  branch  of  the  Aarhus  conference.  In  '62 
with  his  wife  and  three  children  he  started  for  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  church  train  under  Capt.  Mur- 
doch, and  remained  in  Salt  Lake  City  one  year.  Re- 
moved to  Fairview  in  the  fall  of  '63  and  took  part  in  the 
Black  Hawk  war.  He  had  a  hard  time  in  getting  along 
on  account  of  Indians  and  grasshoppers  and  being  in 
debt  for  emigration  expense,  which  with  interest 
amounted  to  nearly  |100  and  required  eleven  years'  sav- 
ing to  pay.  He  took  a  small  farm  and  worked  at  his  trade 
and  in  '74  removed  to  Fountain  Green.  In  '82  he  re- 
turned to  Fairview.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
two  years.  Is  one  of  the  presidents  of  the  quorum  of 
High  Priests.     Was  married  in  Denmark  September  5, 


'578  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

1857,  to  Sarah  Easmussen,  born  in  Denmark  September 
6,  1827.  They  have  six  children:  Caroline  J.,  Antoine, 
Peter,  Sarah  J.,  Annie  J.  and  Andrew  J. 


OLSON,  Peter,  of  Pehrson  &  Olson,  woolgrowers  and 
cattlemen,  son  of  Olof  and  Christina  C,  was  born  in 
Sweden  December  24,  1861.  He  came  with  his 
mother  and  two  sisters  to  Utah  in  '67  and  settled  at  Ver- 
non, where  he  was  engaged  herding  and  working  in  the 
mines.  He  then  jjurchased  sixty-six  sheep  and  secured 
some  on  shares  and  has  made  quite  a  success  of  the  busi- 
ness. In  1885  he  came  to  Fairview  and  now  owns  a  half 
interest  in  5,000  sheep  and  fifty  head  of  cattle,  a  nice 
farm  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  creamery  company.  In  '92 
he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council  and  served 
two  years.  Was  married  in  Manti  Temple  August  28, 
1890,  to  Christina  M.,  daughter  of  Lars  and  Olena  Lar- 
sen,  born  in  Fairv  iew  June  20,  1869.  They  have  five  chil- 
dren: Ida  E.,  Sophronia  C,  Lena  A.,  Peter  E.  and  Char- 
lotte L. 


OLSEN,  CHRISTIAN,  farmer,  son  of  Christian  and 
Brigitta,  was  bom  in  Sweden  February  23,  1841. 
He  was  raised  on  a  farm,  joined  the  Mormon 
church,  and  in  January,  1864,  was  ordained  an  elder, 
^fter  which  he  spent  most  of  the  winters  at  missionary 
work,  until  '68,  when  he  came  to  I^tah  and  located  in 
Salt  Lake  City.  In  October,  1869,  he  came  to  Fairview 
and  engaged  in  farming,  then  in  manufacturing  lumber 
and  for  a  time  was  in  the  mercantile  business.  Went  on 
a  two  years'  mission  to  Sweden  in  '79  and  labored  in  the 
Stockholm  conference.  W^as  a  member  of  the  City  Coun- 
cil nine  years,  president  of  the  Gooseberry  and  Cotton- 
w^ood  Irrigation  company  six  years  and  an  active  worker 
and  teacher  twenty  years.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  March  17,  1869,  to  Christina  Olsen,  a  native  of  Swe- 
■den.  They  have  had  six  children:  Heber  S.,  Christian 
P.  and  George  F.,  living;  Mary  C,  Erick  O.  and  John  J., 
deceased. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  379 

PEDEESOX,  CHAELES  O.,  lumberman  and  farmer, 
son  of  Ole  and  Oloug,  was  born  in  Norway  Decem- 
ber 22,  1860.  He  came  to  Utah  with  his  mother  in 
'71,  resided  in  Salt  Lake  City  six  years,  then  removed  to 
Fairview.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Gooseberry  and 
Cottonwood  Irrigation  company.  Owned  and  operated 
a,  sawmill  for  eight  years  and  served  as  a  Democratic 
member  of  the  City  Council  in  '96-7.  He  served  as  Sun- 
day-school teacher  three  or  four  years  and  as  assistant 
to  the  president  of  the  Scandinavian  society.  Is  a  ward 
teacher  and  was  ordained  a  member  of  the  quorum  of 
Seventies  in  '85.  Was  president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  in 
'89.  In  '85  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Norway 
and  gained  many  converts  to  the  church.  He  is  a  repre- 
sentative and  honorable  citizen.  Was  married  in  Manti 
Temple  June  14,  1888,  to  Elizabeth  T.,  daughter  of  Ean- 
som  A.  and  Tranquilla  A.  Stevens.  They  have  four  living 
childi*en:  Tranquilla  A.,  Helena,  Euth  F.  and  Euby;  the 
deceased  being  Ovidia  and  Charles  O. 

PEDEESON,  PETEE  O.,  farmer  and  lumberman,  son 
of  Ole  and  Olong,  was  bom  in  Norway,  May  21, 
1819.  He  joined  the  Mormon  church  March  12, 
1870,  and  came  to  Utah  August  10  of  the  same  year,  re- 
siding in«Salt  Lake  City  over  six  years,  then  removed  to 
Fairview.  Owns  several  shai'es  in  the  GoosebeiTy  and 
Cottonwood  Irrigation  company  and  is  engaged  in  farm- 
ing and  getting  out  lumber  and  timbers.  Is  a  member 
of  the  Elders'  quorum  and  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  and  a  good 
citizen.  Was  married  in  Norway,  May  13,  1870,  to  Caro- 
line, daughter  of  Hans  O.  and  Petrinila  Fiksted,  born 
in  Norway,  Augrust  11,  1849.  They  have  had  two  chil- 
dren, Ole'^H.,  living,  bom  May  10*,  1874;  Peter  O.,  de- 
ceased. Ole  H.  is  now  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Nor- 
^vay. 

PETEESON,  HON.  LOEENZO,  Mayor,  son  of  Andrew 
and  Anna  M.,  was  born  in  Ephraim,  July  29,  1858. 
His  parents  emigrated  from  Denmark  in  '54,  lived 
in  Brigham  City  and  Salt  Lake  City  till  '67,  then  re- 


:380  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

moved  to  Ephraim,  thence  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  and  in  '60 
located  in  Fairview  among  the  first  settlers.  Father  was 
bishop  a  shoii:  time  and  a  leading  man.  He  died  Jan- 
uary 20,  1873.  Mother  is  still  living.  Lorenzo  was  raised 
here  and  worked  at  carpentering  and  blacksmithing. 
Was  elected  Mayor  in  '90,  serving  two  and  one-half  years, 
having  been  City  Assessor  and  Collector  four  years. 
Served  as  Jusice  of  the  Peace  three  years,  and  in  '97  was 
again  elected  Mayor.  Is  secretary  of  the  Co-op.  store; 
secretary  of  the  Union  Roller  Mills  company;  secretary 
of  the  Gooseberry  Irrigation  company;  a  director  in  the 
Cottonwood  Irrigation  company,  and  vice-president  of 
the  Social  Hall  company.  Was  married  in  Fairview, 
June  9,  1879,  to  Mary,  daughter  of  John  and  Chastie 
Norstrom,  born  in  Sweden,  July  22,  1858.  They  have 
seven  children:  Chastie  M.,  Mary  M.,  Christina  E.,  Annie 
H.,  Arthur  L.,  Peter  L.  and  Ruby  N. 


PETERSON,  BISHOP  JAMES  C,  was  born  in  Den- 
mark, April  5,  1842.  Father  died  when  he  was  six 
years  old  and  mother  with  three  children  started 
for  Utah  in  December,  1854.  Mother  died  of  cholera  near 
Mormon  Grove  and  the  children  were  taken  by  different 
families.  They  crossed  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under 
Capt.  Guyman,  reaching  Salt  Lake  City  in  September, 
1855.  James  was  taken  by  Thomas  Bullock  and  brought 
up  on  a  farm  seven  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake  City.  In 
'64  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emigrants.  He 
secured  a  small  farm  and  added  to  it  gradually  until  by 
diligence  and  economy  he  had  a  good  home.  In  '84  he 
removed  to  Fairview  and  purchased  a  small  farm.  Was 
appointed  bishop  April  20,  1890,  and  served  in  that  ca- 
pacity with  perfect  satisfaction  to  the  entii'e  people.  Is 
a  Republican  in  politics  and  was  a  member  of  the  Con- 
jstitutional  convention.  Is  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
and  a  good,  charitable  citizen.  Was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  county,  December  31,  1865,  to  Sarah  A.,  daughter 
of  Jonathan  and  Sarah  Cushing  Brown,  bom  in  England, 
September  1,  1846.  They  have  four  living  children, 
James  J.,  Charles  A.,  Mary  E.  and  Floren. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  381 

PETERSON,  JAMES,  farmer,  son  of  Andrew  and  An- 
nette, was  born  in  Fairview,  March  12,  1872.  He 
was  raised  there  to  farm  work,  and  in  '92  removed 
to  Oak  Creek,  where  he  owns  tw^entj-six  acres  of  land. 
Is  a  member  of  the  Mormon  church  and  leadei'  of  the 
choir  in  Sunday-school  and  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Fairview,  October  28,  1891,  to  Melissa,  daughter 
of  James  and  Elizabeth  Stewart,  born  in  Fairview,  De- 
cember 12,  1871.  They  have  had  four  children,  Dorcas 
and  Ernest  L.  living-;  James  R,  and  Hyrum  R.,  deceased. 

PETERSON,  ANDREW  S.,  farmer  and  carpenter,  son 
of  John  E.  and  Christine,  was  bom  in  Sweden, 
July  26,  1862.  He  came  to  Utah  with  his  parents 
in  '76,  locating  in  Fairview,  where  they  amved  July 
2-1.  He  has  always  been  active  in  church  matters,  be- 
ing a  member  of  the  Seventies'  quorum,  the  Y.  M.  M.  I. 
A.,  and  a  ward  teacher.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Goose- 
berry and  Cottonwood  Irrigation  company,  and  an  ener- 
getic and  representative  citizen.  He  ow^ns  a  farm  which 
he  cultivates  and  attends  to  the  duties  of  his  trade,  be- 
ing an  experienced  mechanic  and  first-class  carpenter. 
Was  married  in  the  Endowment  House,  Salt  Lake  City, 
August  27,  1883,  to  Caroline,  daughter  of  Carl  and  Caro- 
line Magnuson,  bom  in  Sweden,  March  27,  1865.  She 
died  April  9,  1889,  leaving  three  children,  Caroline  E. 
and  Hilmia  living;  and  Andrew  C.  deceased.  Was  mar- 
ried again  January  6,  1892,  in  the  Manti  Temple,  to  An- 
nie M.,  daughter  of  Ivor  P.  and  Caroline  M.  Peterson, 
bom  in  Spring  City,  January  3,  1870.  They  have  three 
children,  Newel  L.,  Eskel  L.  and  Crystal  M. 

PETERSON,  LEWIS,  City  Marshal,  son  of  Andrew 
and  Annette,  was  born  in  Fairview,  February  9, 
1868.  He  was  raised  here  and  worked  in  the  can- 
yen  at  lumbering.  Was  engaged  in  the  sheep  business 
with  Samuel  Bills  for  several  years,  and  now  owns  sev- 
eral hundred  head.  Owns  an  interest  in  a  binder  which 
is  operated  every  year.  Is  a  member  of  the  Mormon 
church  and  a  ward  teacher.  Was  elected  City  Marshal 
in  '97  and  fills  the  position  with  satisfaction  to  the  peo- 


1 


3!32  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

I)le.  Was  married  in  Logan  Temple,  November  10,  1886, 
to  Sarah  E.,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Ophelia  A.  Bills, 
born  in  Fairview  August  5,  1868.  They  have  had  six 
children,  Ina  A.,  Lionel  L.,  Hilden  L.  and  Alden  L.  liv- 
ing; Kuby  E.  and  Ophelia  D.  deceased. 

PETEKSEN,  CHEISTIAN,  farmer  and  stockraiser, 
was  born  in  Denmark,  May  3,  1845.  Father  died 
in  Denmark  in  '48,  and  mother  and  family  started 
for  Utah.  Mother  died  at  Weston,  Mo.,  in  '55,  and  Chris- 
tian, with  a  brother  and  sister,  was  taken  by  other  fam- 
ilies and  brought  to  Utah.  He  lived  with  H.  P.  Peel  in 
Salt  Lake  City  and  Lehi  for  a  time,  when  the  family  re- 
moved in  '57  to  Ephraim  and  in  '61  to  Mt.  Pleasant. 
He  was  brought  up  to  fanning.  Took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  being  a  miuuteman  under  Capt.  I  vie.  In 
'66  he  went  to  the  Missouri  river  after  emigrants.  E-e- 
moved  to  Fairview  in  '69  and  bought  a  farm,  where  he 
has  since  been  engaged  in  fanning  and  stockraising. 
Served  as  City  Marshal  seven  terms;  Constable  five 
terms,  and  Deputy  Sheriff  four  3^ears.  Has  been  super- 
intendent of  the  Sunday-school  for  four  years.  Was 
married  in  Mt.  Pleasant  January  2,  1867,  to  Christina, 
daughter  of  Andrew  and  Ellen  Anderson,  born  in  Swe- 
den, January  2,  1850.  They  have  had  eleven  children, 
Annie  E.,  Amelia  H.,  Hannah  C,  Alice  M.,  Andrew  C, 
Caroline  E.,  James  L.,  Ellen  M.,  Minerva  S.  and  Edward 
J.  living;  and  Joseph  F.,  deceased. 

PRITOHETT,  JAMES  M.,  retired  farmer,  son  of  Sam- 
uel and  Rebecca  Anderson,  of  Scotch-Irish  de- 
scent, was  born  in  Smyth  county,  Virginia,  June  1, 
1817.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and  came  to  Fairview 
in  November,  1866,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train. 
Bought  a  small  farm  and  has  since  been  engaged  in 
farming.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war. 
Is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store  and  was  once  presi- 
dent of  the  company  for  two  years.  Served  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council.  Is  one  of  the  high  priests  in 
the  Mormon  church.     Was  married  in  Virginia,  Septem- 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  383 

ber  18,  1885,  to  Mary  A.,  daughter  of  Douglas  and  Nancy 
Al^ell  Fulcher,  born  in  Surrey  county,  North  Carolina, 
July  4,  1819.  They  have  four  children,  John  A.,  Thomas, 
James  D.  and  Rebecca. 

PEITCHETT,  N.  B.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Samuel  N.  B.  and  Mary  J.,  was  born  in  Linn  coun- 
ty, Mo.,  Mai'ch  19,  1863.  The  family  came  to  Fair- 
view  in  '65  in  Capt  Pritchett's  company,  an  uncle  to  N. 
B.  Father  was  a  farmer  and  stockman  and  died  here 
in  '70.  Mother  is  still  living.  JST.  B.  was  raised  in  Fair- 
view,  working  at  various  occupations  and  finally  went 
into  the  sheep  business,  accumulating  2,500  head.  In 
'96  he  sold  his  sheep  and  engaged  in  the  cattle  business; 
now  has  seventy  head  and  150  acres  of  land,  being  an 
extensive  and  successful  farmer.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the 
Gooseberry  Irrigation  company,  the  creameiy,  the  Union 
roller  mill  and  the  Co-op.  store.  Served  as  Deputy  City 
IMarshal  two  years.  Was  married  in  Logan,  November 
10,  1887,  to  Olive  L.,  daughter  of  John  F.  and  Mary  I. 
Sanders,  bom  in  Fairview,  October  19,  1872.  Her  par- 
ents were  among  the  early  settlers  of  Fairview,  father 
being  an  extensive  and  wealthy  cattleman,  who  brought 
two  companies  of  emigrants  to'  Utah  and  died  May  19, 
1896.  She  has  five  children,  Mary  L.,  Rolland  N.,  Hazel 
!>.,  John  F.  and  Thomas  L. 

f^ASMUSSEN,  ANDREW,  farmer,  son  of  Anders  and 
IT  Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark,  January  22,  1834.  He 
V  was  raised  there,  and  in  '54  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  became  a  traveling  elder  for  four  years.  In 
May,  '60,  he  started  for  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an 
ox-train  and  located  at  West  Jordan,  where  he  resided 
two  years.  Removed  to  Fairview  in  March,  1864,  and 
bought  ten  acres  of  land.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk 
war  and  was  alone  twice  in  the  foothills  when  he  met 
parties  of  Indians,  but  escaped  by  rare  presence  of  mind. 
Served  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  six  years.  Is  a 
stockholder  in  most  of  the  local  enterprises  which  he  as- 
sisted in  starting.  Is  senior  president  of  the  Twenty- 
sixth  Quorum  of  Seventies.     Was  married  in  West  Jor- 


384  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

dan,  October  12,  1862,  to  Sevirine  M.  Madsen,  who  has 
live  children,  Mary,  Andrew,  Amasa,  Nephi  and  Jacob. 
Second  wife  married  October  12,  1875,  was  Sidsel  M. 
Neilsen.  Third  wife  was  Annie  K,  Mortsensen,  married 
November  1,  1883. 

I^IGBY,  JAMES,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of  James 
|T     and  Jane,  was  born  in  Bm'lington  county,  Iowa, 

V  October  8,  1844.  His  parents  joined  the  Mormon 
church  in  Manchester,  England,  and  started  for  Utah. 
Father  died  in  Iowa  and  mother  and  family  crossed  the 
I)lains  in  an  ox-train  in  '50.  James  grew  up  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  hauled  wood  for  several  years,  and  went  to  Tooele 
county  and  engaged  in  the  cattle  business.  In  '80  he 
came  to  Fairview  and  went  into  the  sheep  business,  run- 
ning the  Co-op.  herd  four  years  and  getting  2,500  head 
of  his  own.  He  sold  out  in  '97  and  returned  to  the  cat- 
tle business,  having  Durhams  principally.  Owns  a  nice 
farm  of  ninety  acres,  is  a  stockholder  in  the  creamery 
and  superintendent  and  director  of  the  Gooseberry  Irri- 
gation company.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war 
as  a  minuteman  in  company  A,  cavalry,  of  Salt  Lake 
City,  under  Capt.  Miles,  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
March  21,  1870,  to  Fannie,  daughter  of  James  and  Sarah 
Jordan,  bom  in  England,  October  8,  1852.  They  have 
ten  cliildren,  James  L.,  Fannie  M.,  Leroy,  Charles,  Joseph 
C,  Mary  E.,  William  F.,  Samuel  B.,  Frank  and  Louis. 

f^IGBY,  CHARLES,  farmer,  son  of  James  and  Jane, 
|T     was  born  in  Iowa,  September  1,  1847.     In  '50  the 

V  family  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox- 
train,  and  located  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  '70  he  came  to 
Fairview  and  bought  a  farm.  Now  owns  fifty  acres.  He 
has  always  taken  an  active  part  in  educational  matters 
and  is  one  of  the  school  trustees.  Was  married  in  Fair- 
view,  September  27,  1875,  to  Julia,  daughter  of  Henry  W. 
and  Rebecca  Sanders  Sanderson,  born  in  Green  River, 
Wyo.,  September  26,  1856.  They  have  had  twelve  chil- 
dren, James  M.,  Lovena,  William  E.,  Howard  W.,  Victor 
R.,  Thomas  M.,  Francis  E.  and  Roland  L.  living;  Charles 
II.,  John  F.,  Emily  E.  and  Horace  D.,  deceased. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  385 

SANDERSON,  OWEN  M.,  teacher,  son  of  Hon.  Henry 
W.  and  Sarah  J.,  was  bom  in  Fairview,  November 
23,  1863.  The  family  came  to  Fairview  among  the 
hrst  settlers.  Father  died  November  12,  1896.  Mother 
is  still  living.  Owen  grew  up  here,  and  in  1893  went  to 
Salt  Lake  City  and  entered  the  law  office  of  Richards  & 
Moyle,  where  he  studied  one  year,  then  went  on  a  two 
years'  mission  to  Tennessee.  On  his  return  he  attended 
tlie  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo  one  year,  taking  the  normal 
cj.urse.  Is  now  engaged  in  teaching  the  school  north  of 
toT\Ti,  where  he  has  been  engaged  some  years.  He  served 
a«  City  Marshal  two  years.  Was  a  contractor  in  build- 
ing the  Rio  Grande  Western  railroad,  and  operated  the 
Deseret  coal  mines  for  two  years.  He  was  the  prime 
mover  in  founding  a  city  library,  which  now  contains 
about  700  volumes.  Is  president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I.  A. 
and  head  teacher  in  the  theological  department  in  the 
Sunday-school.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store, 
the  Co-op.  sheep  herd,  the  Social  hall,  and  is  business 
manager  of  the  Home  Dramatic  company,  being  an  en- 
terprising man  and  an  earnest  laborer  in  all  public  mat- 
ters. Was  married  in  Logan  Temple,  October  2,  1885,  to 
Mary,  daughter  of  Archibald  and  Caroline  Anderson, 
bcrn  in  Fairview,  February  1,  1868. 

SANDERSON,  JAMES,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son 
of  Henrv  W.  and  Rebecca  Sanderson,  was  born 
near  Salt  Lake  City,  May  6,  1851.  In  '57  the  family 
removed  to  Fillmore,  remaining  one  season,  then  to 
Mt.  Pleasant,  being  among  the  first  settlers.  The 
company  consisted  of  James'  parents  and  grandparents 
on  his  mother's  side,  Moses  M.  Sanders  and  wife,  and 
grandmother  on  father's  side,  Mary  J.  Sanderson.  They 
helped  build  the  for-t.  In  '59  they  came  to  Fairview  and 
assisted  in  constructing  the  fort  here.  Father  was  a 
Mormon  battalion  veteran  and  drew  a  pension  at  the 
time  of  his  death.  He  was  a  native  of  Massachusetts 
and  one  of  the  best  educated  men  in  Fairview.  Served 
as  tithing  clerk.  Justice,  Councilman,  Mayor,  and  was 
postmaster  fifteen  years.  He  died  November  19,  1896. 
Mother  is  still  living.    James  grew  up  as  a  farmer.    At- 


386  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

tended  the  local  schools  and  was  a  student  of  the  Des- 
eret  university  one  year.  Taught  school  in  Fairview  one 
year.  In  '79  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Michi- 
gan. On  his  return  was  appointed  manager  of  the  Co- 
op, store,  which  he  held  about  three  years,  then  freighted 
goods  and  bought  a  farm.  Now  owns  160  acres  and  is 
interested  in  farming,  cattle  and  sheep  raising.  Was  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  and  Justice  of  the  Peace 
several  years.  Is  a  director  in  the  Co-op.  stoi-e  and  stock- 
holder in  the  mill.  Was  married  in  FaiiTiew,  February 
o,  187S,  to  Martha  A.,  daughter  of  Henry  D.  and  Mar- 
garet Rees.  Wife  died  January  11,  1882,  leaving  two 
gions,  James  H.  and  Thomas  E.  Married  again  February 
15,  1883,  to  Margaret  Eees,  sister  of  first  wife,  born  in 
Wales,  Utah,  September  24,  1866.  They  have  seven  chil- 
dren, Theodore  R,  Martha  M.,  William  V.,  Stella,  Delia, 
Margaret  and  Mariah. 

SEELY,  JOSEPH  N.,  farmer,  son  of  Bishop  William 
S.  and  Elizabeth,  w^as  born  in  Pleasant  Grove, 
Utah,  March  5,  1853.  The  family  removed  to  Mt. 
Pleasant  in  '59  among  the  first  settlers,  and  Joseph  grew 
up  in  that  city.  At  the  age  of  21  he  went  to  Indianola, 
took  up  160  acres  of  land  and  engaged  in  stockraising 
and  later  changed  to  sheep,  selling  out  in  '97.  In  '91  he 
purchased  a  farm  in  Fairsiew,  where  he  now  resides. 
He  owns  about  500  acres.  Has  served  as  Justice  of  the 
Peace  four  years.  Was  married  in  Fairview,  June  9, 
1879,  to  Cecelia,  daughter  of  Hyrum  and  Elizabeth  Wint- 
ers, bom  in  Pleasant  Grove,  July  7,  1854.  Her  parents 
were  among  the  early  settlers  and  her  father.  Dr.  Wint- 
ei-s  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  is  an  old-time  practitioner,  well 
and  favorably  known.  She  has  five  children,  Effle  R., 
Joseph  H.,  Maxwell  D.,  Dean  W.  and  William  G. 

STEVENS,  ARNOLD,  lumberman  and  farmer,  son  of 
R.  A.  and  T.  A.  Stevens,  was  born  in  Fairview, 
March  2,  1866.  He  grew  up  here  and  has  since 
resided  in  this  place.  He  has  a  farm  of  forty  acres  and 
is  engaged  in  farming  and  getting  out  lumber  from  the 
mountains.  Is  a  member  of  the  Young  Men's  Mutual 
Improvement  association  and  an  honest  and  industrious 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  887 

citizen.  Was  married  in  Logan  Temple,  March  25,  1885, 
to  Augusta,  daughter  of  Hans  and  Caroline  Amunson, 
bom  October  4,  1866.  They  have  five  children,  Hans 
A.,  Eansom  A.,  Delia  A.,  Ernest  A.  and  Hannah  O. 

Q-  TE  YENS,  KANSOM  A.,  farmer  and  market  gardener, 
^  son  of  Arnold  and  Lois,  was  born  in  Spring-held, 
111.,  September  27,  1839.  His  father  took  part  in 
building  the  Xauvoo  Temple  and  was  fourth  corporal 
of  company  D  in  the  Mormon  battalion.  He  died  in 
Pueblo,  Colo.  Ransom  A.  was  born  in  the  Mormon  faith, 
came  to  Utah  in  '51  and  settled  on  Spanish  Fork  river, 
oast  of  Spanish  Fork,  where  he  lived  six  years,  then  re- 
moved to  Spanish  Fork  for  four,  thence  to  Salem  one 
year,  and  came  to  Fairview  in  '61.  He  was  one  of  the 
home  guard  in  both  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk  wars. 
Served  as  a  member  of  the  police  force  two  years.  Has 
been  quorum  teacher  and  ward  teacher  and  is  now  a 
member  of  the  High  Priests'  quorum.  He  helped  build 
the  first  grist  mill  and  is  at  present  a  stockholder  in  the 
Fairview  creameiw  and  the  Gooseberry  and  Cottonwood 
Irrigation  company,  and  is  one  of  the  leading  public- 
spirited  citizens  of  the  town.  Was  married  in  Fairview 
February  17,  1863,  by  Bishop  James  X.  Joues,  to  Tran- 
quilla  A.,  daughter  of  Lindsey  and  Elizabeth  Ann  Brady, 
born  in  Hancock  county,  Illinois,  January  22,  1846.  They 
have  had  twelve  children,  Arnold,  Lindsey  A.,  Elizabeth 
T.,  Lois  A.,  Tranquilla  A.,  Justus  P.,  Rhoda  M.,  Sophia 
B.,  Keziah  F.  and  Warren  A.,  living;  Ransom  M.  and 
Mary  E.,  deceased. 

STEWART,  HENRY  L.,  son  of  Nathaniel  and  Phebe 
A.,  was  born  in  Prove,  Utah,  April  15,  1859.  His 
parents  came  to  Faiiwiew  in  the  spring  of  '60  among 
the  early  settlers.  Some  years  later  they  removed  to 
Payson,  where  father  died,  and  the  family  returned  to 
Fairview,  where  mother  still  resides.  A  brother,  Na- 
thaniel, was  killed  two  miles  north  of  town  by  Indians 
Avhile  herding  cattle.  Henry  was  raised  here  and  has 
served  one  term  as  City  Marshal. 


388  HI8T0EY    OF    SANPETE   COUNTY. 

STEWAKT,  JAMES,  farmer,  son  of  Nathaniel  and 
Dorcas,  was  born  in  Green  county,  Indiana,  Feb- 
ruary 14,  1827.  The  family  removed  to  Missouri 
and  were  in  all  the  Mormon  persecutions  in  that  State 
aLd  Illinois,  and  lived  for  a  time  in  Iowa.  He  enlisted 
in  the  Mormon  battalion  in  Council  Bluffs  in  company 
D  under  Capt.  Nelson  Higgins.  In  '47  he  came  to  Utah, 
arriving  with  the  company  that  reached  Salt  Lake  City 
July  28,  1847.  He  soon  returned  to  Missouri,  and  in  '50 
came  again  to  Utah,  locating  in  Provo.  His  parents 
followed  in  '51.  Took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  and 
has  spent  most  of  his  time  in  canyon  work  and  farming. 
Was  married  in  Provo  July  23,  1852,  to  Elizabeth,  daugh- 
ter of  Jonathan  and  Rebecca  Hoops,  born  in  Columbus 
county,  Ohio,  June  28,  1833.  They  have  had  twelve  chil- 
dren, James  W.,  Edmund  W.,  Francis  M.,  Emily  B.,  Sa- 
lina,  Henrietta,  George,  Sarah  E.  and  Melissa  living; 
Jonathan,  Hyrum  and  Eva,  deceased. 


gUNDWALL,  HON.  PETER,  merchant  and  post- 
master, son  of  Olof  and  Katrina,  was  boru  in  As- 
pos,  Sweden,  June  11,  1848.  He  was  raised  in  Swe- 
den and  came  to  Utah  in  '72,  worked  in  the  mines  till 
'75,  when  he  located  in  Fairview  and  soon  became  man- 
ager of  the  Co-op.  store.  In  '81  he  went  on  a  mission  to 
Scandinavia,  returning  in  '84  and  resumed  his  work  as 
manager  of  the  store  till  '94,  when  he  was  called  to  pre- 
side over  the  Scandinavian  mission,  with  office  in  Co- 
j)enhagen.  Was  appointed  postmaster  on  his  return  in 
'96,  and  elected  the  same  year  a  member  of  the  Board  of 
County  Commissioners.  Served  as  INlayor  from  '85  to  '91 
and  was  County  Commissioner  in  '93.  Is  a  director  in 
the  Union  Roller  Mill  company  and  president  and  man- 
ager of  the  Co-op.  Sheep  company.  Is  a  Democrat  in 
politics  and  a  member  of  the  Twenty-sixth  Quorum  of 
Seventies  in  church  matters.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  February  1,  1875,  to  Anna  K.,  daughter  of  Lars 
Johansen,  born  March  17,  1848.  They  have  five  children, 
Peter,  Annie,  John,  Mary  I.,  Olof  and  an  adopted  son, 
Carl. 


/       4 


KI-IAS    W.     H()\VKI>b. 
FAIRAIEW. 


ANDREW     LASHON. 
FAIRVJKW. 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  389 

TERIIY,  ANDREW  B.,  son  of  Otis  L.  and  Martha  J., 
was  born  in  Fair-view  Noyember  13,  1867.  He  was 
raised  here  as  a  farmer.  In  '90  he  began  taking- 
sheep  and  caring  for  them  on  shares,  and  in  '96  he  took 
the  Co-op  sheep  herd,  which  he  has  since  handled  with 
perfect  satisfaction  to  the  stockholders.  Was  married  in 
the  Manti  Temple,  November  7, 1894,  to  Phebe  B.,  daugh- 
ter of  AVilliam  S.  and  Phebe  J.  Taylor,  born  in  Fairview 
March  19,  1S73.  They  have  two^  children:  Edna  L., 
born  December  19,  1895,  and  Andrew  B.,  August  16,  1897. 

Tp]KPtY,  CHAKLES  A.,  lumber  manufacturer,  son  of 
Otis  L,  and  Sarah  H.,  was  born  in  Union  Fort,  Salt 
Lake  county,  ^May  3,  1858.  The  family  came  to  Fair- 
view  in  '60,  wher*e  Charles  Avas  raised  and  has  resided, 
being  engaged  in  farming  and  lumbering.  He  has  a  farm 
of  125  acres  and  for  many  years  has  manufactured  lum- 
ber and  shingles.  Is  also  interested  in  Avoolgrowing.  In 
'86  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  southern  Illinois. 
Is  one  of  the  presidents  of  the  Twenty-sixth  quorum  of 
Seventies.  Was  married  in  Fairview^  November  5,  1876, 
to  Margaret  A.,  daughter  of  Archibald  and  Sarah  J. 
Reese  Anderson,  born  in  Fairview,  May  25,  1860.  They 
have  had  eleven  children:  Charles  A.,  Archibald  O.,  Mar- 
garet M.,  Thomas  R.,  Ira  L.,  Essie  M.  and  Eva  O.,  living; 
Sarah  L.,  Lula  D.,  William  L.  and  Agnes  A.,  deceased. 
Second  w^fe,  maiTied  im  Logan  Temple  August  8,  1885, 
was  Jane  A.  Beswick,  who  died  October  15,  1895.  /he 
has  one  child  living:  Joseph  A.,  and  Edmund  L.,  Francis 
N.  and  Annie  S.,  deceased. 

TERRY,  EDMUND  L.,  son  of  Otis  L.  and  Sarah  V., 
wns  born  in  Salt  Lake  county  April  20,  1851.  His 
parents  came  to  Fairview  among  the  first  settlers. 
He  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  and  made  furniture  for 
some  years,  then  engaged  in  the  lumber  business.  He, 
with  others,  built  the  first  sawmill — an  up-and-down — in 
Huntington  Canyon,  and  afterward  changed  to  a  circular 
saw.  Later  he  and  three  others  purchased  a  steam  saAV- 
mill  and  soon  added  another,  operating  both.     He  then 


390  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  for  several  years  un- 
til his  store  was  merged  into  the  Co-op.  Has  an  interest 
in  one  of  the  mills;  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store, 
being  superintendent  in  '94-'95;  a  stockholder  in  the 
Co-op  sheep  herd  and  the  flouring  mill,  having  been  man- 
ager of  the  mill.  Served  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council. 
In  January,  1896,  he  went  on  a  mission  to  Alabama, 
Avhere  he  still  labors.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
February  23,  1874,  to  Rebecca  C,  daughter  of  Amasa  and 
Rebecca  W.  Tucker,  born  in  Pleasant  Grove  March  ]  1, 
1856.  Thej^  have  had  twelve  children,  seven  living: 
George  O.,  Hyrum  W.,  Ellice  T.,  Mary  P.,  Jessie  A.,  Sarah 
A.  and  Ining  L. 


TERRY,  OTIS  L.,  son  of  Otis  and  Cynthia  Ruggles, 
was  born  in  Worcester  county,  Mass.,  March  12, 
1818.  The  family  resided  in  vaiious  places  and 
located  in  Michigan,  where  they  joined  the  Mormon 
church.  In  '45  they  removed  to  Nauvoo,  111.,  in  '46  to 
Winter  Quarters,  and  in  '50  to  Salt  Lake  City,  Otis  being 
captain  of  a  comijany  of  fifty  in  ox-train.  He  located 
at  Union  For-t  and  learned  the  trades  of  a  cooper  and 
blacksmith.  In  '60  he  came  to  Fairview  and  assisted  in 
building  the  fort.  Took  pai-t  in  the  Black  Hawk  war. 
Received  twenty  acres  of  land  and  engaged  in  farming 
and  running  flour  and  saw  mills.  Is  a  stockholder  in  the 
Union  roller  mill.  Has  always  been  an  active  man  in 
the  church  and  is  now  one  of  the  High  Priests.  Was 
first  married  in  Oakland,  Mich.,  in  '42,  to  Fannie  M. 
Loveridge.  She  died  in  Ogden  April  4,  1856,  leaving 
four  living  tliildren:  Orson  M.,  Emma  J.,  Otis  L.  and 
Alvin  D.  Second  wife  w^as  Levee  T.  Dancy,  married  in 
Salt  Lake  City  in  '51.  She  has  six  living  children:  Hul- 
dah  C,  Terresa,  Cynthia,  Lois,  John  and  Emily  A.  Third 
■wife  was  Jane  Hart.  She  and  two  children  are  dead. 
Fourth  wife  was  Sarah  Howell,  a  native  of  Long  Island, 
N.  Y.,  born  June  29,  1818.  She  has  six  children:  Elias 
W.,  Mary  L.,  Ophelia  A.,  Edmund  L.,  Charles  A.  and 
Celestia  M.  Fifth  wife  w^as  Martha  J.  Vanvalkenberg. 
She  has  five  children,  William,  Margaret  L.,  Eugenia  G., 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE   COUNTY.  391 

Berdell  and  Wilford.     His  descendants  number  nearly 
500  persons. 

TEKRY,  HON.  OTIS  L.,  JR.,  farmer,  son  of  Otis  L. 
and  Fanny  M.  Loveridge,  was  bom  in  wliat  is  now 
East  Mill  Creek  ward,  Salt  Lake  City,  January  6, 
1852,  His  parents  removed  to  Fairview  among  the  first 
settlers,  when  he  was  a  boy,  but  he  remained  with  grand- 
ptirents  and  was  raised  to  farm  worn  at  Union  Fort. 
In  '86  he  came  to  Fairyiew,  where  he  has  a  farm  of  thir- 
ty-one acres.  Was  a  member  of  the  City  Council  in  '94- 
'95,  and  elected  Mayor  in  fall  of  '95  on  the  Democratic 
ticket.  He  was  president  of  the  Y.  M.  M.  I,  A.  six  years; 
second  counsellor  to  the  president  of  the  High  Priests' 
quorum,  and  an  active  teacher  eight  years.  Was  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City  December  28,  1876,  to  Sarah  L., 
daughter  of  Elias  W.  and  Martha  J.  Howell,  bom  in 
Union  Fort  January  3,  1859.  They  have  had  ten  chil- 
dren, Phylinda,  Willis  E.,  Martha  L.,  Charles  D.,  Fanny, 
Roselee,  Oscar  and  Walter  living;  Otis  L.  and  Emma  J., 
deceased. 

TERRY,  AVILLIAM  H.,  farmer,  son  of  Otis  L.  and 
Martha  .J.,  was  born  in  Fairview  January  3,  1864. 
He  wa>;  raised  here  and  has  been  engaged  in  farm- 
ing aud  lumbering,  having  leased  and  operated  several 
sawmills*  in  this  vicinity.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
Novembei'  15,  1883,  to  Annie  S.,  daughter  of  Joseph  and 
Annie  Reswirk,  bom  in  Fairview  August  24,  1863.  They 
have  had  seven  childreu,  five  liviug,  the  othei-s,  with  the 
mother,  being  dead.  Children  are:  William  H.,  Margaret 
L.,  .loseph  B.,  James  L.  and  Ernest  B.,  living;  Annie  S. 
and  Rosetta,  deceased. 

TUCKER,  HON.  AM  ASA,  SR.,  son  of  .James  and 
Nancy,  was  born  in  Woodstock,  Brooklyn  county, 
Conn.,  October  22,  1833.  The  family  removed  to 
Massachusetts  when  he  was  2  years  old,  aud  to  Nauvoo, 
111.,  when  he  was  7,  having  joined  the  Mormon  church  in 
'39.  They  removed  to  Pottawattamie  county,  Iowa. 
Father  died  in  Lee  county,  Iowa,  and  in  '52  they  crossed 


392  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capt.  Jan)es  C.  SSncnv.  and 
located  in  Pleasant  Grove.  In  '59  the  family,  consisting 
of  Amasa,  his  wife,  mother  and  two  brothers,  removed 
to  Mt.  Pleasant.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  ^va?- 
as  a  minuteman,  being  Captain  of  a  comfiany,  and  was 
in  man}^  excursions  against  Indians.  In  'OG  he  wns  ap- 
pointed bishop  of  Fairview  and  removed  here,  holding 
the  position  for  twenty-three  years.  He  and  his  son,  with 
brother  George,  operated  a  portable  sawmill  for  many 
3"ears.  He  ran  the  Temple  sawmill  six  years  and  the 
Deseret  coal  mine  two  years.  Was  Mayor  six  years  and 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  two  3'ears.  Was  married  in 
Pleasant  Grove  June  20,  1855,  to  Rebecca  Winters.  She 
had  six  children:  Cordelia  I?.,  Helen  S.,  Amasa  and 
Sarah  A.,  living;  Elis  M.  and  George  O.,  deceased.  Sec- 
ond wife  was  Mar-tha  Anderson.  She  had  nine  children: 
James  H.,  Geneva,  Ethel  G.,  Jessie  P.,  Arthur  E.,  Francis 
M.,  Loren  and  Winnie  M.,  living;  Mabel  R.,  deceased. 
Third  wife  was  Annete  Petei-sen.  She  has  had  seven 
children:  Annete  S.,  Amos  F.,  Mary,  Moroni,  Annie  and 
Charles  P.,  living;  Hyrum,  deceased. 

TRUCKER,  AMASA,  JR.,  lumberman,  son  of  Amasa 
V3  and  Rebecca  Winters,  was  born  in  Mt.  Pleasant 
March  1,  18G3.  In  '66  the  family  removed  to  Fair- 
view,  where  Amasa  has  spent  most  of  his  time  working 
in  sawmills.  Has  been  an  engineer  in  mills  during  the 
past  sixteen  years.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  No- 
vember 8,  1883,  to  Lois  A.,  daughter  of  Otis  L.  and  Levee 
T.  TeriT,  born  in  Fairview  July  22,  1863.  They  have  four 
living  childr-en:  Amasa  L.,  George  O.,  Percy  D.  and  Hil- 
den  E.,  and  Arza  R.,  deceased. 

T"  UCKER,  GEORGE,  fanner,  son  of  James  and  Nancy, 
O  was  born  in  Massachusetts  October  27,  1837.  He 
came  to  Utah  in  '52,  stopping  in  Pleasant  Grove  till 
'60,  then  removed  to  Mt.  Pleasant,  and  finally  came  to 
Fairview,  where  he  has  since  resided.  He  took  an  active 
part  in  both  the  Walker  and  Black  Hawk  wars,  being 
captain  of  militiamen  in  ]Mt.  Pleasant  during  the  Black 


HISTOKY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY.  393 

Hawk  war.  He  was  oue  of  the  men  Avho  helped  recap- 
ture and  exterminate  San  Pitch  and  his  men  when  they 
escaped  from  Manti  jail.  Served  as  City  Marshal  six 
years  and  a  member  of  the  City  Council  two  years.  Is 
president,  of  the  Elders'  quorum  and  has  served  in  that 
position  for  some  time.  Is  also  a  ward  teacher  and  an 
honest  and  earnest  churchman.  He  was  part  owner  of  a 
sawmill  for  twenty  years  and  has  but  recently  sold  out 
his  interest.  Has  160  acres  of  land,  fifty  acres  being  un- 
der cultivation,  and  is  a  well-known  and  representative 
man.  Was  first  manied  in  Mt.  Pleasant  February  6, 
1861,  to  Tena  Swenson.  She  died  in  '67  and  he  married 
Emma  J.  Hurst  in  Fairview  March  7,  1868.  She  died 
June  1,  1882,  leaving  seven  children:  Travers,  Myron, 
Mai-y  R.,  Frank,  AMlliam,  Amos,  Byron  E.  and  Charles. 
Was  again  man'ied  in  Fairview,  December  16,  1883,  to 
Mary  C.  Christiansen.  Their  children  are:  Hyrum  M., 
Orson,  Emma  R.  and  Reuben  M. 

1  ^ANCE,  HYRUM  M.,  farmer,  son  of  Isaac  Y.  and 
\J  Martha,  was  born  at  Union  Fort,  Salt  Lake  county, 
Utah,  September  27,  1857.  The  family  removed  to 
Fairview  among  the  first  settlers,  and  Hyrum  was  raised 
to  farming.  He  owns  fifty  acres  of  good  land  and  has 
a  nice  farm.  Was  married  in  Fairview^  December  11, 
1889,  to  Edith  E.,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Amy  Jones 
Garlick.  They  have  had  five  children,  Hyrum  M.  and 
Amy  living;  Mary  F.,  Martha  E.  and  Sarah  E.,  deceased. 

1  /aNCE,  GEORGE  H.,  fai-mer,  son  of  Isaac  Y.  and 
\J  Martha,  w^as  born  in  Salt  Lalve  county  September 
14,  1849.  The  family  were  among  the  early  set- 
tlers of  Fairview^,  arriving  in  1859.  George,  though  only 
a  boy,  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  one  of 
the  minutemen,  and  has  taken  an  active  part  in  local 
affairs  ever  since.  He  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  De- 
cember 20,  1869,  Mary  Wakefield,  daughter  of  John  and 
Susan,  born  iii  Pottawattamie  county,  Iowa,  April  20, 
1S50.  Their  children  are  Mar-tha,  Sarah,  Julia,  Myron, 
Byron,  Alice,  Marinda,  living;  and  Mary  E.  and  George 
H.,  deceased. 


394  HisTOKY  or  sanpete  county. 

1  1  ^ALKER,  JOHN  A.,  lessee  of  the  Union  roller  mills, 
\XJ  of  the  firm  of  Walker  &  Hansen,  son  of  Robert  and 
Mary  J.,  was  born  in  Wellington  county,  Ontario, 
February  28,  1855,  of  Scotch  and  German  pai'entag'e.  In 
'72  the  family  removed  to  Jackson  county,  Iowa,  where 
they  remained  four  years.  He  went  to  California  in 
'76  and  began  learning  the  jeweler's  trade,  but  in  '78 
came  to  Fairview.  Being  a  natural  machinist  he  worked 
at  various  occupations,  developing  the  love  for  mechan- 
ism till  Januaiy  1,  1898,  when  he  and  Hans  P.  Hansen 
leased  the  Union  mill,  a  fifty-barrel  mill,  well  equipped 
vvith  modern  machineiy,  a  first-class  flouring  mill.  The 
firm  is  also  interested  in  mining  property  west  of  Eph- 
raim.  John  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op.  store,  pavilion, 
Social  hall,  Co-op.  sheep  herd  and  the  mill,  and  owns  a 
fortv-acre  farm.  Is  a  member  of  the  T\venty-sixth  Quo- 
rum of  Seventies  and  a  ward  and  Sunday-school  teacher. 
In  '91  he  T\^nt  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Nebraska,  Was 
married  in  Logan  Temple  February  10,  1887,  to  Mary  J. 
Hansen  nee  Neilsen,  bora  in  Denmark  October  13,  1852. 
She  has  one  son,  Hans  P.  Han.sen,  born  January  21,  1876. 
He  attended  the  schools  of  Fairs'iew  and  took  a  normal 
course  in  the  B.  Y.  Academy  at  Provo.  Is  a  prominent 
musician,  leader  of  the  band  and  a  member  of  the  or- 
chestra, and  has  studied  chemistiy.  Is  a  member  of  the 
Elders'  Quorum  and  quite  an  active  worker  in  the  Y. 
M.  M.  I.  A. 


MORONI 


Moroni  is  a  pleasantly  located  city  in  north  central 
Sanpete,  eij'liteen  miles  from  Manti,  on  tlie  Sanpitch 
river  and  the  Sanpete  Valley  railroad.  This  settlement 
was  begun  in  the  spiing  of  '59  by  Bishop  G.  W.  Brad- 
ley, J.  Woolf,  Isaac  Morlej^,  H.  Gustin,  G.  H.  Bradley, 
Niels  Cummings  and  N.  L,  Christensen,  a  party  of  bold 
pioneers  from  Nephi,  who  selected  the  site  because  of  its 
delightful  situation  and  central  point  for  the  building  up 
of  a  commercial  city.  N.  L.  Christensen's  wives  were  the 
first  women  in  Moroni.  The  first  colonists  were  strong, 
determined  men  and  women,  who  tunneled  the  snow- 
banks of  Salt  Creek  canj^on,  working  earnestly  and  with- 
out faltering  for  three  days  to  clear  a  road  through  the 
canyon  and  across  the  divide  into  this  chosen  valley. 
The}^  had  none  of  the  present  home-making  materials  and 
were  satisfied  Avith  constructing  dugouts  on  the  river 
bank,  where  gardens  were  planted,  ditches  constructed 
and  preparations  made  for  establishing  a  permanent 
and  prosperous  colony  by  observing  the  principles  of 
home  co-operation. 

The  high  waters  soon  destroyed  all  fond  anticipa- 
tions of  early  gardens  and  practically  robbed  the  settlers 
of  the  first  year's  crops  by  overflowing  the  fields  and  fill- 
ing the  irrigation  ditches.  But  the  early  colonists  of 
Utah,  and  especially  of  Sanpete  county,  were  not  baffled 
by  misfor-tunes,  and  notwithstanding  the  loss  of  crops, 
the  Moroni  people  were  determined  to  succeed  in  erect- 
ing homes  and  conquering  the  desert.  They  elected 
Bishop  Bradley  captain  of  the  town  and  organized  for 


396  HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

mutual  protection  against  Indians,  who  became  trouble- 
some soon  after  the  settlement  was  begun.  New  families 
were  soon  added  to  the  original  company  and  the  colony 
assumed  business  porportions.  A  grist  mill  was  built  by 
Bishop  Bradley,  a  store  opened  by  John  Ganut  and  a 
ward  organized,  which  necessitated  the  erection  of  a 
church  and  school  building.  Amusements  were  intro- 
duced and  as  the  town  increased  in  population  more  mod- 
ern privileges  were  enjoyed. 

The  colony  endured  many  hardships  incidental  to 
pioneer  life,  but  withstood  all  discouragements  until  the 
Black  Hawk  war,  when,  for  a  period  of  about  six  years, 
the  people  could  do  nothing  but  fight  Indians  and  guard 
their  homes  and  property  from  the  savages.  The  city 
was  incorporated  in  186(>,  and  at  the  close  of  the  Indian 
wars  began  to  flourish  as  an  impoiiant  ])lace.  A  grist 
mill,  sawmill,  stores  and  other  business  houses  were 
erected  and  irrigating  canals  constructed  to  the  several 
fields  for  growing  hay,  grain  and  potatoes,  for  which 
Moroni  has  become  famous.  Tlie  first  important  mercan- 
tile establishment  was  that  of  tlio  Moroni  Co-op  store, 
which  began  business  on  a  very  limited  scale,  occupying 
a  little  room  13x20  feet  and  carrying  a  small  stock  of 
goods.  The  capital  stock  at  the  beginning  was  only  |500, 
yet  the  first  year  the  business  done  aggregated  |3,600  and 
a  dividend  of  25  per  cent  was  declared. 

The  present  capitalization  of  the  store  is  |20,000,  and 
a  business  of  |50,000  is  transacted  every  year.  Bishop 
John  W.  Irons  is  president,  having  occupied  that  position 
for  twenty  years.  Andrew  Anderson  is  the  present  effi- 
cient manager  and  treasurer.  The  company  now  occu- 
pies two  large  brick  store  buildings  and  carries  a  com- 
plete stock  of  general  merchandise,  furniture,  farm  im- 
plements and  machinery.    Co-operation  characterized  all 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  397 

early  efforts  of  the  people  in  all  enterprises  and  the  irri- 
gation canals  were  thus  constructed.  Several  farm 
ditches  are  in  operation  and  the  Moroni  and  Mt.  Pleasant 
Irrigating-  Ditch  company,  incorporated  June  20,  1893, 
with  a  capital  stock  of  $30,000,  completes  the  irrigation 
systems  of  the  city  and  vicinity.  The  city  has  nice  or- 
chards, good  gardens,  and  nearly  5,000  acres  under  iiTi- 
gation.  Stockraising  and  woolgrowing  engage  the  atten- 
tion of  some  of  the  citizens,  while  many  are  engaged  in 
farming  and  lumbering. 

A  Latter-day  Saints'  ward  was  organized  immedi- 
ately after  the  arrival  of  the  pioneers,  and  Bishop  George 
W.  Bradley  controlled  the  ecclesiastical  powers  until 
'7G,  when  he  resigned,  and  Bishop  John  W.  Irons,  the 
present  incumbent,  was  appointed.  The  several  church, 
auxiliaries  of  Belief  Society,  Mutual  Improvement  Asso- 
ciations, Primaries,  Sunday-schools  and  various  quorums 
were  soon  organized  and  are  now  in  a  flourishing  condi- 
tion, reflecting  the  high  moral  and  religious  sentiments 
for  which  Moroni  citizens  are  praised  by  their  neighbors 
in  adjacent  towns  and  cities.  The  benefits  of  these  or- 
ganizations were  never  more  distinctly  visible  than  dur- 
ing the  early  days,  where  Indian  ravages,  floods,  grass- 
hoppers and  other  calamities  visited  the  people,  necessi- 
tating the  presence  of  kind  friends  to  assist  each  other 
in  their  bereavements. 

In  "80  Miss  Sarah  A.  McMillan  opened  a  mission 
school  in  Moroni  under  the  auspices  of  the  Presbyterian 
Board  of  Missions.  She  occupied  only  rented  buildings 
and  worked  under  manj-  disadvantages.  The  work  was 
continued  by  Misses  Sadie  E.  Brown  and  Florinda 
Stayers  for  about  five  years  and  then  discontinued.  A 
building  lot  was  purchased,  but  no  house  has  been 
erected.    Occasional  services  have  been  held  by  the  pas- 

13 


398  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

toi  at  Mt.  Pleasant,  but  no  clmrcli  has  yet  been  organ- 
ized. The  Methodist  Episcopal  church  began  missionary 
work  in  Moroni  in  '83,  the  laborers  being  from  Mt. 
Pleasant.  In  '86  a  chapel  was  erected  and  regular 
schools  conducted.  The  first  teacher  was  Miss  Mary 
Iverson,  who  was  succeeded  by  Misses  Mary  Jensen,  Liz- 
zie Evans  and  others.  The  school  has  always  been  first- 
class  and  the  teachers  accomplished  in  their  vocations. 

Amusements  had  to  be  provided  for  the  young  in 
early  days  and  local  theatrical  performers  were  trained 
to  the  demands  of  necessity.  The  schoolhouses  were  used 
for  enteriainments  until  '91,  when  Hon.  Mons  Monson 
and  T.  J.  Morley  exhibited  their  enterprise  and  faith  in 
the  future  of  the  city  by  the  erection  of  the  largest  and 
bets  equipped  Opera  House  in  the  county.  The  building 
is  constiiicted  of  brick  and  stone,  the  roofing  being  of  cor- 
rugated iron.  It  is  35x83  feet  and  has  a  seating  capacity 
of  1,000,  being  frequently  filled  when  general  political 
or  other  public  meetings  are  held.  The  building  is  an 
ornament  to  the  city  and  a  credit  to  the  amusement-lov- 
ing citizens.  It  is  used  for  dancing  and  general  amuse- 
ment purposes.  An  elegant  stage  occupies  a  space  of  35x 
25  feet  and  is  highly  appreciated  by  theatrical  companies, 
who  seldom  find  such  an  opera  house  in  towns  of  this 
size. 

Jensen  Bros.'  grist  mill,  located  two  miles  east  of 
the  city,  was  built  in  '85  and  has  since  been  remodeled 
and  furnished  with  all  the  modern  machinery  necessary 
for  a  first-class  custom  and  commercial  mill.  The  build- 
iL'g  is  40x60  feet,  three  stories  in  height,  and  has  abun- 
dant storage  room  for  home  grain.  Water  power  from 
never-freezing  springs  propels  the  mill  and  a  constant 
run  is  made  the  entire  year  round,  with  a  capacity  of 
5^000  pounds  of  first  grade  flour  every  twenty-four  hours. 
The  products  are  found  on  all  the  general  markets  of 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  399" 

Utah  and  command  a  ready  sale  everywhere.  Many  saw- 
mills, owned  by  Moroni  people,  have  been  operated  in 
the  canyons  in  the  past  years,  until  the  laws  on  timber 
cutting  w^ere  so  strictly  enforced,  and  some  of  the  best 
citizens  have  engaged  in  lumbering.  Mining  has  never 
engaged  the  people  of  this  city  to  any  great  extent,  ex- 
c(  pt  in  outside  camps,  but  more  or  less  prospecting  ha^ 
been  done  in  the  West  mountains  supposed  to  contain 
gold  and  silver. 

Moroni  people  have  always  been  much  interested  in 
education  and  in  consequence  have  maintained  good  pub- 
lic schools  at  the  most  convenient  points  in  the  city. 
Several  students  have  been  prepared  for  higher  educa- 
tional institutions  and  some  have  w^on  honors  at  home 
and  abroad  in  the  highest  classes.  The  present  popula- 
ticn  numbers  about  1,800,  and  several  first-class  schools 
are  taught  during  the  school  years.  In  politics  the  city 
is  Democratic,  having  been  controlled  by  the  People's 
prrty,  previous  to  the  general  organization  of  the  national 
parties.  Among  the  most  prominent  men  who  have  filled 
important  county  and  State  offices  from  Moroni  are: 
Rons.  J.  L.  Jolley,  member  of  the  Constitutional  conven- 
tion; Aaron  Hardy,  member  of  the  State  Legislative  As- 
sembly; Will  L.  Irons  and  Mons  Monson  each  serving  ^ 
County  Treasurer  on  the  Republican  and  Democratic 
tickets  respectively. 

The  Sanpete  Valley  railroad  was  built  to  Wales  in 
the  early  days  of  coal  mining  and  later  abandoned  and 
a  track  put  down  to  Moroni  and  this  city  made  the  ter- 
minus. This  stimulated  foreign  shipments  and  gave  the 
place  an  impetus  to  financial  prosperity.  Car  shops  were 
constructed  here  and  local  men  employed  in  conducting 
the  general  work  of  the  railroad  company,  and  Moroni 
was  made  the  distributing  point  for  mail  to  all  Southern 
cities  and  towns.     Since  the  completion  of  the  road  to 


400  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

Morrison  and  the  opening  of  coal  beds  operated  by  the 
Sterling  Goal  and  Coke  company,  this  city  has  become 
a  prominent  shipping  point  in  supplying  the  mines  and 
also  a  good  market  for  the  home  coal.  The  road  has 
many  residents  of  Moroni  employed  in  its  operating  de^ 
partment  and  there  is  a  bond  of  union  and  sympathy  be- 
tween the  city  and  corporation,  not  noticed  in  many  lo- 
calities. 

The  Meadow  View  and  Moroni  creameries  are  im- 
lioi'tant  industries  located  in  the  vicinity  and  using  Mo- 
roni as  a  shipping  point.  These  companies  distribute  sev- 
eral thousand  dollars  annually  among  the  people  in  pay- 
ment for  milk  and  supplies.  The  city  has  good  hotels 
and  stores,  enterprising  and  industrious  artisans  and  me- 
chanics; first-class  mills  and  machinery;  numerous  shops 
and  institutions  of  commerce  and  industry,  and  a  most 
energetic  and  honest  population  devoted  to  tlieir  several 
occupations.  In  former  years  a  company  of  the  National 
Guard  of  Utah  was  maintained  in  this  city  and  consisted 
of  the  most  representative  young  men,  G.  W.  Lowry  being 
Captain,  Mart  Bradley  and  D.  H.  Cook  Lieutenants.  The 
company  was  discharged  at  the  termination  of  the  period 
of  enlistment  and  has  not  since  reorganized.  When  Pres- 
ident William  McKinley  issued  a  call  for  volunteers  in 
the  war  with  Spain,  the  following  patriotic  young  men 
responded:    John  Jensen,  Christian  Blom. 

Moroni  has  always  been  economically  managed  by 
competent  men  comprising  the  several  municipal  boards; 
taxes  have  been  low;  sanitary  conditions  excellent  and 
the  health  and  prosperity  of  the  people  has  been  the 
watchword  of  the  city  officials.  The  present  City  Council 
consists  of  the  following  well-known  and  representative 
citizens:  Orlando  Bradley,  Mayor;  Daniel  H.  Cook,  J.  M. 
Ohristensen,  Jr.,  John  Bailey,  Andrew  L.  Bradley  and 
Joachim  C.  Anderson,  Councilmen;  John  Stott,  City  Ke- 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  401 

corder;  George  P.  Simpson,  Justice,  and  G.  W.  Lowry, 
Constable.  The  city  has  good  soil  for  the  manufacture  of 
brick  and  for  growing  sugar  beets.  The  central  location 
and  excellent  shipping  facilities  make  it  an  ideal  spot  for 
the  investment  of  capital  in  many  manufacturing  enter- 
prises. The  close  proximity  to  abundant  cheap  fuel,  suffi- 
cient water  i)ower  and  surrounded  by  inexhaustible  raw 
material,  constitute  a  favorable  situation  for  woolen 
mills,  starch  factoiries,  boot  and  shoe  factories  and  many 
more  equally  important  and  dividend-paying  home  in- 
dustries. 

Freedom  is  a  most  pleasantly  situated  suburban 
mountain  retreat  four  miles  from  Moroni.  This  little  par- 
adise was  located  in  '70  by  Henry  Draper  and  family. 
He  remained  there  for  many  years  and  occupied  the  po- 
sition of  bishop.  The  present  bishop  is  Hon.  M.  V.  Tay- 
lor, founder  of  the  Meadow  View  creamery.  The  little 
mountain  cove  is  a  perfect  fruitdale  and  the  home  of  the 
dairy.  Here  are  located  a  few  families  engaged  in  the 
several  agricultural  pursuits  surrounded  by  the  evidences 
of  health,  wealth  and  happiness. 


PROMINENT  CITIZENS  OF  MORONI. 


f\  MES,  KEUBEN  K.,  farmer,  son  of  Eeuben,  was  boru 
M  in  Epliraim  September  17,  1857.  His  father  was  a 
/  native  of  Norfolk,  England,  Joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  emigrated  to  Utah  in  the  early  '50s,  living  in 
Salt  Lake  City,  Manti,  Ephraim  and  Moroni,  coming  here 
in  '59.  He  took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
and  was  a  prominent  man  in  Sunday-school  work  and 
among  children.  He  followed  fanning  and  was  universal- 
ly admired  by  those  who  knew  him.  Both  parents  died, 
leaving  five  children,  of  which  the  subject  of  this  sketch 
is  one.  Eeuben  K.  was  raised  here  and  engaged  in  farm- 
ing, now  owns  a  nice  thirty-acre  farm  one  mile  east  of 
the  city.  He  seized  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  two 
years.  Is  an  active  member  of  the  Mormon  church  and  a 
much  respected  man.  Was  married  in  Moroni  November 
13,  1881,  to  Mary  M.,  daughter  of  James  and  Mary  A. 
Cloward,  born  in  Salem,  Utah.  She  died  in  '89,  leaving 
five  children:  Reuben  R.,  Melissa,  James,  Glendora  and 
Roscoe.  He  was  married  again  in  April,  1891,  to  Helen, 
daughter  of  H.  P.  and  Ansene  Peterson,  a  native  of  Den- 
mark. They  have  had  three  children:  Edith  and  Sada, 
living;  Mary,  deceased. 

n  NDERSON,  ANDREW,  manager  and  treasurer  of  the 
M  Co-op  store,  son  of  Peter  and  Christina,  was  born  in 
/  Moroni  November  8,  18G4.  He  was  educated  in  the 
Moroni  district  schools,  and  in  '81  entered  the  Co-op  as 
a  clerk.  In  '89  he  became  manager.  He  has  three  assist- 
ants and  carries  a  general  stock  of  dry  goods  and  gro- 
ceries, besides  farm  machinery,  wagons  and  buggies.  The 
stock  usually  carried  amounts  to  |20,000  and  the  firm 
does  a  business  of  |50,000  a  year.  Bishop  John  W.  Irons 
is  president.  Andrew  is  a  live,  hustling  business  man 
and  one  of  the  representative  citizens.     In  '98   he    con- 


HISTOKY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  403 

structed.  one  of  the  finest  residences  in  the  city.  Was 
married  in  Manti  December  10,  1890,  to  Mary  A.,  daugh- 
ter of  Lars  N.  and  Peruella  Larsen,  born  in  Moroni  De- 
cember 27,  18G3.  Her  parents,  both  now  deceased,  were 
among  the  early  settlers  of  Moroni.  She  has  two  chil- 
dren:   Andrew  F.  and  Rodney  L. 

n  NDEESON,  JOACHIM  C,  contractor  and  builder  and 
M  member  of  the  City  Council,  son  of  Andrew  C.  and 
/  Katrina,  was  born  in  Denmark  September  13,  1852. 
He  learned  the  trade  of  a  cai-penter  and  in  '81  came  to  the 
United  States,  residing  in  Iowa,  Illinois  and  St.  Paul, 
Minn.,  till  '86,  when  he  removed  to  Manti,  having  joined 
the  Mormon  church  in  St.  Paul,  and  worked  on  the  Tem- 
ple two  and  a  half  years,  when  he  came  to  Moroni  and 
worked  over  one  year  on  the  meeting-house.  He  then 
opened  a  shop  and  has  contracted  and  put  up  many 
buildings  in  Moroni.  Owns  a  forty-acre  farm;  was  a 
school  trustee  three  terms  and  elected  a  member  of  the 
City  Council  in  '97.  Is  an  active  member  of  the  Demo- 
cratic club,  having  served  as  chairman  and  secretary.  Is 
secretary  of  the  quorum  of  Seventies  anxl  a  director  of  the 
ecclesiastical  board  and  a  much  respected  citizen.  Was 
married  in  Logan  October  21,  1887,  to  Annie  C.  Ander- 
son, born  in  Mt.  Pleasant  September  2,  1867.  They  have 
had  five  children:  Abner  J.,  Andrew  F.,  Raphael  M.  and 
Ira  K.,  living;  Irvin  V.,  deceased. 

ANDERSON,  DANIEI;,  farmer,  son  of  Neils  J.  and 
r\  Caroline,  was  born  in  Denmark  March  28,  1866. 
/  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '72,  came 
to  Utah  and  located  at  Moroni.  Mother  died  here. 
Father  is  still  living  and  has  performed  a  mission  to  his 
native  land.  Daniel  grew  up  here  to  farm  work  and  now 
has  seventy-five  acres  of  land.  He  was  married  in  Logan 
Temple,  October  27,  1886,  to  Vilate,  daughter  of  James 
M.  and  Mary  A.  Cloward,  born  in  Moroni  April  17,  1870. 
Her  father  was  born  in  Chester  county,  Pennsylvania, 
October  17,  1826;  came  to  Utah  in  '51  and  to  Moroni 
about  '67.    He  served  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council 


404  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

and  Mayor  and  was  accidentally  killed  by  a  horse  in 
Emery  county  May  27,  1890.  He  was  a  blacksmith  and  a 
prominent  citizen.  Mother  was  born  in  Chester  county, 
Penn.,  July  19,  1836,  and  died  in  Moroni  April  24,  1886. 
The  children  of  Daniel  and  Vilate  are:  Maiy  C,  Daniel 
J.  and  Annie  E.,  living;  Addie  Y.  and  an  unnamed  infant 
deceased. 

BAILEY,  JOHN,  farmer  and  stockraiser.  and  member 
of  the  City  Council,  son  of  John  and  Jane,  was  born 
in  Leiscestershire,  England,  November  26,  1840. 
The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and  in  '56  emi- 
grated to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Martin's 
handcart  company,  fitted  out  at  Florence,  Nebraska,  in 
which  many  persons  died  from  cold  and  hunger.  They 
were  met  by  a  relief  expedition  and  brought  to  Salt  Lake 
City  and  from  there  went  to  Nephi,  Avhere  they  resided 
till  '60,  when  they  came  to  Moroni.  They  took  up  land 
and  farmed.  Father  died  in  '91,  aged  85  years.  Mother 
died  in  '95,  aged  86  years.  John  took  part  in  the  Black 
Hawk  war  as  a  minuteman,  being  in  the  engagements  in 
Salina  canyon  and  Grass  valley.  In  '63  he  returned  to 
the  Missouri  river  after  emigrants.  He  now  has  a  farm 
of  sixty  acres  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store.  Is 
a  prominent  Democrat,  being  chainnan  of  the  party,  and 
a  member  of  the  City  Council,  which  position  he  has  held 
thirteen  years.  Is  road  supervisor  and  a  representative 
citizen.  Was  married  in  Moroni  February  20,  1866,  to 
Charlotte,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Ellen  Shepherd,  bom 
in  Staffordshire,  England,  May  7,  1848.  They  have  eleven 
children:  Sarah  E.,  Ellen,  Jane,  John,  Joseph,  Parley, 
Albert,  George,  Edward,  Melissa  and  Fern. 

BLACKHAM,  JOHN,  fanner,  son  of  Samuel  and  Mar- 
tha Robinson,  was  born  in  Lancashii^,  England, 
November  14,  1827.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  cot- 
ton spinner,  joined  the  Mormon  church  April  28,  1849, 
and  in  '55  came  to  Utah  with  his  wife  and  two  children, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Milo  Andrews'  ox-train,  and 
located  in  Salt  Lake  City.  In  '56  he  responded  to  the  call 
of  Brigham  Young  and  went  with  others  in  an  expedition 


NIKI-S   CHKISTENSKN. 
MORONI. 


JENS    W.    JENSEN, 
MORONI. 


HISTOKY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  405 

to  relieve  the  handcai't  company.  He  removed  to  Fill- 
more in  '57  and  in  '59  came  to  Moroni,  wkei^  he  received 
a  small  farm  and  now  has  twenty-seven  acres.  He  took 
an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  holding-  the  rank 
of  Second  Lieutenant,  and  Avas  in  the  Salina  canyon  en- 
gagement. With  his  three  sons  he  was  among  the  first 
to  work  on  the  Manti  Temple.  Is  a  stockholder  and  for- 
merly a  director  in  the  Co-op  store  and  a  land  company. 
Is  a  member  of  the  High  Priests'  quorum  and  was  for 
several  years  superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school.  He 
is  an  old  resident  and  respected  citizen.  Was  married 
in  England  April  21,  1851,  to  Susannah,  daughter  of 
John  and  Betsey  Lees,  born  in  Lancashire,  December  11, 
1830.  They  have  nine  children:  Elizabeth,  Martha,  Wil- 
liam, John,  Josiah,  Samuel,  Alma,  Betsey  and  Mary  A. 
Second  wife  was  Elizabeth  Christensen.  She  has  two 
children:  John  M.  and  Annie. 

BLACKHAM,  WILLIAM,  farmer,  woolgrower  and 
manufacturer  of  lumber,  son  of  John  and  Susan, 
was  born  in  Salt  Lake  City  October  31,  1856.  He 
came  to  Moroni  with  his  parents  in  the  spring  of  '59  and 
grew  up  to  farm  work.  At  the  age  of  18  he  began  freight- 
ing produce  to  the  mining  camps  of  Utah  and  Nevada 
and  continued  in  that  bu^siness  fifteen  years.  He  then 
bought  a  farm  and  now  owns  forty  acres  and  a  band  of 
500  sheep.  In  '95  he  and  William  Cook  bought  a  porta- 
ble sawmill  east  of  Mt.  Pleasant,  which  they  run.  He 
served  as  a.  member  of  the  City  Council  two  years  and  is 
an  honest,  hardworking  man.  W^as  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  March  24,  1881,  to  Vicinia  C,  daughter  of  Uriah  and 
Elizabeth  Curtis,  born  in  Springville,  Utah,  October  15, 
ISCO. 

BLACKIIAJM,  ALMA,  farmer  and  woolgrower,  son  of 
John  and  Susannah,  was  born  in  Moroni  November 
5,  1869.  He  was  raised  to  the  accoupation  of  a 
farmer  and  when  he  attained  manhood  bought  a  small 
farm.  He  now  owns  twenty  acres  of  land  and  has  2,300 
sheep.  Is  an  active  Republican  politician,  an  energetic 
worker  and  prominent  citizen  in  church  and  public  mat- 


406  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

ters.  He  was  married  in  Manti  Temple  December  22, 
1893,  to  Lucy,  daughter  of  Henry  E.  and  Amelia  Potter, 
born  in  Moroni.  They  have  two  children:  Amelia  and 
Alma  E. 

BLACKHAM,  HIEAM,  farmer,  son  of  James  and  Har- 
riett, was  born  in  Moroni  March  14,  1881,  being  one 
of  the  first  children  born  in  the  town.  His  parents 
emigrated  from  England  in  '57,  locating  in  Salt  Lake 
City,  then  to  Kephi  and  to  Moroni,  as  one  of  the  first  fam- 
ilies. Father  helped  make  the  first  irrigation  ditches. 
Hiram  w^as  brought  up  here  to  farming  and  has  been  en- 
gaged in  that  work.  He  Avas  baptized  into  the  Mormon 
church  in  '73,  and  for  the  past  five  years  has  been  coun- 
sellor to  the  president  of  the  Elders'  quorum.  Was  mar- 
ried in  the  Endowment  House,  Salt  Lake  City,  November 
22,  1871,  to  Arlety,  daughter  of  Isaac  and  Abiah  Morley, 
born  in  Moroni  February  15,  18G3.  They  have  seven  chil- 
dren: Hiram,  HaiTiett,  Edgar,  Edney,  Alphonso,  Morley 
B.  and  Laura. 

BRADLEY,  HON.  ORLANDO,  Mayor,  son  of  George 
H.  and  Elizabeth  A.  Love,  was  bora  in  Moroni  De- 
cember 25,  18(»2.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm  and  has 
followed  farming  all  his  life.  Now  owns  thirty-five  acres 
of  good  land.  In  '93  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  and  seiwed  as  City  Marshal  for  a  short  time.  In 
'97  he  was  elected  Mayor  on  the  Democratic  ticket  and 
serves  in  that  capacity  with  satisfaction  to  the  people. 
He  has  performed  a  mission  of  two  years  to  the  Southern 
States  and  is  prominent  in  church  and  political  circles. 
Was  man  led  in  Logan  December  4,  1884,  to  Irene,  daugh- 
ter of  William  and  Mary  H.  Draper,  born  in  Spanish 
Fork  March  8, 1861.  They  have  had  five  children:  Laura, 
Grover  O.,  assistant  superintendent  of  the  Sunday- 
school,  Sadie  M.  and  Irene  A.,  living;  Mary  E.,  deceased. 

BRADLEY,  ANDREW^  L.,  member  of  the  City  Council 
and   farmer,  son  of  George   H.  and   Elizabeth   A. 
Love,    was  born  in  Nephi,  Utah,  June  6,  1858.     He 
came  with  his  parents  to  Moroni  in  '59,  where  they  were 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  407 

the  first  settlers.  At  the  age  of  16  he  began  freighting 
to  the  mines  of  Utah  and  Neyada,  when  his  father  and 
grandfather  became  railroad  contractors,  and  he  worked 
for  them.  He  afterward  became  a  contractor  in  hauling 
coal  and  grading  on  the  Sanpete  Valley  railway.  Is  now 
engaged  in  farming  and  owns  thirty  acres.  Served  as  a 
school  trustee  three  years  and  in  '97  was  elected  a  mem- 
ber of  the  City  Council  on  the  Democratic  ticket.  Is  a 
prominent  politician  and  has  been  a  delegate  to  many 
State  and  county  conventions.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake 
City  February  3,  1881,  to  Elsie  M.,  daughter  of  John  N. 
and  Elsie  Anderson  Larsen,  born  in  Moroni  September 
20,  1861.  They  have  six  children :  Andrew  L.,  Ella  M., 
John  F.,  Mary  G.,  Katie  and  Bigelow. 

/QIIRISTENSEN,  NIELS,  farmer  and  proprietor  of  the 
\^  Moroni  Creamery,  son  of  Niels  and  Christiana,  was 
born  in  Mill  Creek,  Salt  Lake  county,  Utah,  May  16, 
1859.  The  family  came  to  Moroni  in  '00  and  Niels  was 
raised  here  to  farm  work.  When  he  grew  to  manhood 
he  engaged  in  farming  and  stockraising,  and  now  has  170 
acres  of  land.  In  the  spring  of  '95  he  started  the  Moroni 
Creamery,  with  a  capacity  of  3,000  pounds  per  day.  He  is 
now  making  about  2,000  pounds  daily.  He  served  as  a 
member  of  the  City  Council  two  years  and  is  a  prominent, 
reliable  business  man.  He  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
January  15,  1880,  to  Maria,  daughter  of  Easmus  and 
Maria  Johnson,  born  in  Denmark  October  5,  1859.  They 
have  had  seven  children:  Hannah  E.,  Elmer  E.,  Euby 
C,  Grover  E.  and  Ehoda  A.,  living;  Victoria  M.  and  Niels 
E.,  deceased. 

fQ  HEISTENSEN,  PETEE  C,  farmer,  son  of  Christian 
\.  and  Caroline,  was  born  in  Copenhagen,  Denmark, 
December  5,  1850.  His  parents  died  on  the  ocean 
while  en  route  to  Utah  and  he  was  taken  by  John  Fos- 
gren,  who  brought  him  to  Utah  in  '53,  locating  in  Eagle 
valley  till  '58,  thence  to  Box  Elder  county  and  in  '59  he 
came  to  Moroni.  He  lived  with  Fosgren  about  five  years, 
then  with  Abner  Lowry  twelve  years.  In  '66  he  began 
farming  for    himself  and  has  followed  farming,  freight- 


408  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

ing  and  the  mercantile  business.  Is  now  engaged  in 
farming,  having  140  acres  of  land.  Owns  an  interest  in 
a  steam  sawmill  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Meadow 
View  Creamery  company.  Has  served  as  a  member  of 
the  City  Council  and  delegate  to  many  county  conven- 
tions of  the  Republican  party,  of  which  he  is  an  active 
member.  Served  as  counsellor  in  the  Elders'  quorum 
two  years.  He  was  married  in  the  Salt  Lake  Temple  to 
Mary,  daughter  of  Edward  and  Ophelia  Mallinson.  They 
have  nine  children:  Edward  C,  Peter  A.,  Blanche,  Ernest 
R.,  Hannah,  Nelson,  Randall,  Viola  and  Frank  J, 

(C^HRISTENSEN,  NIELS,  retired  fanner,  was  born  in 
%.  Denmarlv  April  25,  1832.  He  was  raised  on  a  farm, 
joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '53  and  in  '57  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  a  handcart  comj^any  under  Capt. 
Christiansen.  The  company  was  fitted  up  at  Iowa  City 
and  he,  with  his  wife  and  three  childr-en,  started  for 
Utah.  Caroline,  the  eldest  child,  was  then  3  years  old, 
and  is  now  married  to  Lauritz  Christensen  of  Freedom. 
The  second  child  died  on  the  road  and  the  third,  Chris- 
tina, then  only  three  weeks  old,  is  now  the  wife  of  James 
Syme  of  Moroni.  They  had  to  haul  the  children,  bedding 
and  provisions  by  hand  and  were  eighty-seven  days  mak- 
ing the  trip.  He  first  located  at  Mill  Creek,  Salt  Lake 
county,  remaining  two  years,  and  in  January,  1860,  came 
to  Moroni,  where  he  bought  a  small  farm;  now  owns 
eighty-six  acres.  He  took  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war, 
being  an  express  carrier.  Has  served  as  a  member  of  the 
City  Council  several  terms;  was  City  Justice  two  years. 
Assisted  in  organizing  the  Co-op  store  and  served  as  a 
director  and  superintendent  two  years.  He  has  always 
been  active  in  churcJi  matters,  being  a  teacher,  counsel- 
lor, assistant  superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school  and 
at  present  a  member  of  the  High  Priests'  quorum.  Was 
married  in  Denmark  in  January,  1853,  to  Christiana 
Christensen,  daughter  of  Jeppa  and  Karen.  She  died  in 
Moroni  September  28,  1884.  The  children  not  named  as 
crossing  the  plains  are:  Niels,  Hyrum,  Christiana  E., 
Emily  and  Heber. 


HISTORY  OF  SANPETE  COUNTY.  409 

/JJT:IEISTENSEN,  J.  M.,  JR.,  principal  of  the  district 
V  schools,  son  of  James  jNI.  and  Annie  K.,  was  born 
in  Moroni  October  27,  1868.  His  parents  came  to 
this  country  in  '67  and  located  at  Moroni,  where  father 
was  engaged  as  a  farmer  and  merchant  and  served  as 
Mayor  of  the  city  for  several  years.  He  took  part  in  the 
Black  Haiwk  war  and  was  superintendent  of  the  Co-op 
store  for  some  time,  in  which  he  is  still  interested.  Is 
the  principal  stockholder  in  tlie  Meadow  View  Creamery 
and  one  of  the  firm  of  J.  M.  Christensen  &  Co.,  Salt  Lake 
City,  where  he  now  resides.  J.  M.,  Jr.,  gi^w  up  here, 
attended  the  schools  of  Moroni  and  the  Deseret  Univer- 
sity and  began  teaching.  In  '92  and  '93  he  was  made  prin- 
cipal of  the  schools,  which  position  he  still  retains  with 
satisfaction  to  patrons  and  pupils.  Is  a  stockholder  in 
the  Co-op  store  and  a  director  and  treasurer  of  the  ^lea- 
dow  View  Creamery  company.  Is  an  active  Democratic 
politician  and  has  served  the  third  term  as  a  member  of 
the  City  Council.  Was  married  in  Manti  December  5, 
1894,  to  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  George  H.  and  Elizabeth 
Bradley,  born  in  Moroni  December  28,  1874.  They  have 
one  child:   Melba. 

/J)  HEISTENSEN,  LAUEITZ,  farmer  and  stockraiser, 
v.  son  of  Soren  and  Elsie,  was  born  in  Denmark  April 
28,  1845.  His  early  days  w^ere  spent  in  farming  and 
fishing  and  as  a  feri-yman.  The  family  joined  the  Mor- 
mon church  about  '58,  and  in  '60  emigrated  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Oscar  Stoddard's  handcart 
company.  They  fitted  out  at  Florence;  father,  mother 
and  two  sons  pulled  the  handcart  to  Salt  Lake  City  and 
located  in  Moroni,  where  parents  died.  In  '64  Lauritz 
went  back  after  emigrants.  When  the  Black  Hawk  war 
broke  out  he  was  chosen  Captain  and  led  his  company 
into  the  engagements  in  Salina  canyon  and  at  Fish  Lake. 
In  '75  he  located  at  his  present  home,  where  he  has  a  nice 
sixty-acre  farm,  with  good  orchard,  one  and  a  half  miles 
north  of  Freedom.  Was  mari-ied  in  Salt  Lake  City  May 
19,  1873,  to  Caroline,  daughter  of  Niels  and  Christiana 
Christensen,  born  in  Denmark.     They  have  eleven  chil- 


410  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE    COUNTY. 

'dren:    Lauritz  U.,  Vina,  Ettie,  Kiels  A.,  Emma  I.^  Sorem 
-E.,  Joseph,  William  E.,  Dortliea,  Celia  M.  and  Ernest  L. 

(^OOK,  DANIEL  H.,  blacksmith  and  City  Councilor, 
^  son  of  William  N.  and  Elizabeth,  was  born  in  Gold 
Hanger,  Essex  county,  England,  December  1,  1850.  He 
entered  a  blacksmith  shop  when  9  years  old  and  worked 
there  till  '66,  when  he  came  to  Utah  on  account  of  having 
joined  the  Mormon  church;  crossed  the  plains  in  Capt. 
Olassby's  ox-train  and  located  at  Salt  Lake  City.  In  No- 
vember, 1874,  he  removed  to  Moroni,  where  he  has  fol- 
lowed his  trade  and  erected  a  fine  brick  residence.  He 
was  one  of  the  first  miners  in  the  Tintic  district  and 
lielped  develop  that  district  at  Silver  City  and  Camp 
Floyd.  Now  owns  a  seventy-five-acre  farm,  which  is  con- 
ducted by  the  boys.  Is  an  active  Democrat  and  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  City  Council  in  '97.  Has  served 
as  a  delegate  to  several  county  and  State  conventions. 
Is  an  active  churchman,  member  of  the  Elders'  quorum 
and  a  respected  citizen.  Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City 
October  3,  1873,  to  Emeline,  daughter  of  AYilliam  and 
Fannie  Draper,  born  in  Draperville,  Utah,  June  8,  1855. 
They  have  had  seven  children:  William  N.,  Charles  R., 
Edna  E.,  Clara  B.,  Chloe  and  Macel  E.,  living;  Lily  M., 
deceased. 


DANIELS,  WILLIAM,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
Frederick  and  Dorthea,  was  born  in  Germany  June 
1,  1831.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  stone  mason  and 
in  '53  removed  to  Denmark,  where  he  joined  the  Mormon 
church.  In  '75  he  emigrated  and  located  in  Moroni  for  a 
time,  then  took  up  160  acres  of  land  two  and  a  half  miles 
south  of  the  city,  where  he  now  has  200  acres,  and  is  en- 
gaged in  stockraising.  He  is  a  member  of  the  board  of 
school  trustees  and  a  good,  representative  citizen.  Was 
married  in  Denmark  July  3,  1856,  to  Sophia  Thompson, 
born  in  Denmark  March  8, 1833.  They  have  six  children: 
Dora,  Mene,  Henry,  Christian,  Josephine  and  Hyrum. 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  411 

DRAPER,  AMOS,  lumber  manufacturer,  son  of  Wil- 
liam and  Ruth  H.,  was  boorn  in  Spanish  Fork,  Utah, 
March  4,  1863.  He  came  with  his  parents  to  Moroni  in 
March,  1SG5,  and  grew  up  here.  In  '82  he  engaged  in  the 
sawmill  business  and  has  followed  the  work  ever  since. 
He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Moroni  Irrigation  company 
and  served  as  teacher  in  the  Elders'  quorum  in  '95  and 
'96.  Was  married  to  Sarah  J.,  daughter  of  Charles  and 
Jane  Thomas,  born  in  Moroni  May  7,  1864.  They  have 
six  children:  Almira,  Amos,  Charles  P.,  Sarah  J.,  Wil- 
liam C.  and  Cora. 

DRAPER,  WILLIAM  J.,  farmer,  son  of  Moses  and 
Rachel,  Avas  born  in  Draper,  Utah,  June  25,  1862. 
He  grew  up  in  Moroni  to  farming  and  freighting 
work.  Now  owns  about  twenty-five  acres  of  land  and  is 
engaged  in  farming.  Is  a  Democrat  and  acted  as  dele- 
gate to  the  county  convention  in  '97.  Was  married  to 
Laura  C,  daughter  of  J.  C.  and  Cheston  Nielsen,  born 
December  22,  1865.  They  have  had  eight  children:  Win- 
nie I.,  Niel  J.,  Arthur,  Tessie,  Austin  and  Rosbel,  living; 
Oscar  J.  and  an  unnamed  infant,  deceased. 

DRAPER,  RILEY  N.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of 
W^illiam  and  Fanny,  was  born  in  Draperville,  Utah, 
May  7, 1857.  His  father  came  to  Utah  with  the  pio- 
neers. Riley  N.  owns  a  farm  of  sixty  acres;  is  one  of  the 
ecclesiastical  board  of  directors  for  twoi  years'  term  and 
one  of  the  prominent  farmers  of  Moroni.  Was  married 
in  Moroni  January  2,  1879,  to  Margaretta,  daughter  of 
Isaac  and  Abiah  Morley,  born  April  29,  1861.  Wife  died 
August  18,  1897,  leaving  five  children:  Margaretta)  L., 
Delbert  M.,  Roswell  N.,  Fanny  A.,  Sherman  L.  and  Phile- 
mon, and  Philetus,  deceased. 

DRAPER,  MOSES,  farmer,  son  of  William  and  Eliza- 
beth, was  born  in  Canada  of  American  parentage 
July  9,  1832.     In  '34  the  family  removed  to  Kirt- 
land,  Ohio,  having  joined  the  Mormon  church  the  year 
before  through  the  preaching  of  Brigham  Young.  Father 
helped  build  the  Kirtland  Temple  and  passed  through 


412  HISTORY   OF  SANPETE   COUNTY, 

^he  church  persecutions  in  Missouri  and  Illinoisy  losing: 
a  great  deal  of  property.  When  they  were  driven  from 
Nauvoo  their  property  was  burned  for  the  third  time.  In. 
"'49  they  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains,  in  Capt. 
'George  A.  Smith's  company,  and  located  at  Draper, 
mamed  after  father,  who  was  bishop  and  the  leading  man. 
Moses  was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  October  4,  1855,  to 
Eachel  M.  Hefner,  President  Brigham  Young  officiating. 
In  April,  18(35,  they  came  to  IMoroni,  where  he  now  has  a 
farm  of  130  acres.  He  performed  a  mission  of  six  months 
in  the  Elk  Mountain  country  in  '55  and  took  part  in  the 
Walker  and  Black  Hawk  Indian  Avars.  His  eleven  chil- 
dren are:  IMoses  H.,  Julia  A.,  William  J.,  IMargaret  A.^ 
Ada,  Anna,  Lauraett,  Celestia,  Ervin,  Erwin  and  Melvin. 

DRAPER,  PARLEY  P.,  farmer,  son  of  William  and 
Betsey,  was  born  in  l^ike  county,  Illinois,  March  30, 
1843.  The  family  joined  the  Mormon  church  and 
passed  tlirough  the  persecutions  in  Missouri  and  Illinois, 
father  being  a  bishop  in  Iowa.  In  '49  they  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  Capt.  George  A. 
Smith,  and  soon  located  in  Draper,  the  town  being  named 
for  father  Draper,  who  was  bishop  eighteen  years.  They 
resided  for  a  time  in  Spanish  Fork  and  in  '64  came  to 
Moroni,  where  father  was  an  enterprising  and  leading 
citizen.  He  died  at  Freedom.  Parley  P.  grew  up  here  to 
farming  and  stockraising.  In  '66  he  went  back  to  the 
Missouri  river  after  emigrants  in  Capt.  Abner  Lowry's 
company.  He  was  in  active  service  throughout  the  Black 
Hawk  war,  being  in  the  Salina  Canyon  engagement, 
whei^e  he  and  George  Jackson  were  cut  olf  from  the  com- 
pany and  almost  captured.  The  Indians  fired  fifty  shots 
at  them.  He  held  the  rank  of  Second  Lieutenant.  He 
served  as  City  IMarshal  two  years;  was  in  the  City  Coun- 
cil two  years  and  is  at  present  engaged  in  farming,  hav- 
ing twenty  acres  of  land.  Was  married  in  Draper  to 
Margaret  Simmonson,  a  native  of  Denmark.  They  have 
eleven  living  children:  Parley  J.,  Hetty,  Frank,  Free- 
man, Homer,  Orson,  Vina,  Ray,  Amanda,  Archie  and 
Mai-v. 


E 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  413 

DWAKDg,  JAMES  P.,  JE.,  barber,  son  of  James  P. 
and  Catherine  Petty,  was  born  in  Manti  May  17, 
1870.  He  removed  to  Sterling  in  '81  and  folloAved 
farming  for  three  years,  then  went  to  Glenwood  Springs, 
Colorado,'  and  engaged  in  the  sawmill  business  with  his 
brother  Albert.  After  one  year  he  returned  to  Sterling 
and  resumed  farming  and  stockraising.  He  and  brother 
Albert  then  contracted  timbers  for  S.  S.  Jones  and  fur- 
nished lumber  and  ties  for  the  San]3ete  Valley  Kailway 
company  in  '91.  After  marriage  he  engaged  with  Wil- 
liam Montgomery  of  Manti  as  barber  for  one  year,  then 
came  to  Moroni,  where  he  had  a  nice  shop  and  did  a  good 
business.  Was  married  May  15,  1895,  to  Janie  L.,  daugh- 
ter of  Abner  and  Arlish  Funk  Lowr^^,  born  October  4, 
1874.  They  have  had  one  child,  Erwin,  born  January  20, 
1895;  died  August  4,  1896.  Mrs.  Erwards  learned  the 
trade  of  milliner  from  Mrs.  Ehoda  Smyth  of  Manti  and  is 
doing  a  fine  business  in  that  line. 

ELIASSON,  NILS  L.,  proprietor  of  the  Eliasson  Hotel, 
son  of  Lars  and  Hannah,  was  born  in  Sweden  Au- 
gust 27,  1838.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  landscape 
gardener  and  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '60.  In  '67 
he  came  with  his  family  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  un- 
der Capt.  Eice,  and  located  at  Moroni.  He  bought  a  farm 
and  now  owns  250  acres,  being  engaged  in  general  farm- 
ing and  stockraising.  In  '81  he  was  appointed  postmas- 
ter and  held  the  position  till  '93.  Served  as  registration 
officer  during  the  time  of  the  Utah  Commission  and  was 
census  enumerator  for  the  eleventh  census.  Is  one  of  the 
directors  in  the  Moroni  Irrigation  company  and  a  prom- 
inent and  representative  man.  Was  married  in  Sweden 
August  9,  1863,  to  Elna  Pehrson,  born  in  Sweden  Sep- 
tember 6,  1843.  They  have  had  six  children:  Nils,  Or- 
lando, Wilhelm,  Berthman,  Emma  and  Erica. 

FAUX,  JABEZ,  farmer,  son  of  Thomas  and  Ann,  was 
born  in  Yorkshire,  England,  March  16,  1837.       He 
learned  the  trade  of  fitter  in  a  machine  shop,  joined 
the  Mormon  church  and  in  '60  emigrated  to  Utah,  cross- 


414  HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

ing  tlie  plains  in  a  handcart  company  under  Capt.  Robin- 
son, walking  all  the  way  from  Florence,  Neb.,  and  lo- 
cated at  Moroni.  He  worked  some  time  in  a  blaeksmith 
shop,  making  plows  of  old  goA^emment  wagon  tires  and 
other  iron  scraps  picked  np  on  the  plains.  In  a  few  years 
he  engaged  in  farming  and  now  has  seventy-five  acres. 
He  took  an  active  part,  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  Helped 
organize  the  Co-op  store;  was  the  first  clerk  and  for  twen- 
ty-five years  has  been  connected  with  the  institution, 
most  of  the  time  as  superintendent;  is  now  one  of  the  di- 
rectors. Served  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council  and 
City  Recorder  several  years.  Since  '90  he  has  been  super- 
intendent of  the  Sunday-school.  In  politics  he  is  a  Re- 
publican and  is  a  prominent  and  much  respeeted  citizen. 
Was  married  in  Moroni  December  24,  1862,  to  Anna  Dan- 
ielson,  born  in  Sweden.  They  have  had  eight  children: 
Jabez,  Joseph,  John,  Anna  and  George,  living;  Ada, 
Mary  and  an  unnamed  one,  deceased. 

/*  EE,  JOSEPH,  notary  public,  son  of  Joseph  and 
yi  Nancy,  was  born  in  Bradbur}^,  Cheshire,  England, 
^  October  20,  1834.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a  cotton 
spinner  and  worked  at  that  for  thirty  years.  In  '54  he 
joined  the  Mormon  church  and  was  president  of  Ashton 
under  Lyne,  Oldham  and  Rochdale.  He  came  to  Utali  in 
'74,  settled  at  St.  George  two  years,  then  removed  to 
Moroni  in  '76.  Is  at  present  deputy  watermaster  iind 
notai-y  public.  Was  elected  Assessor  and  Collector  of 
Moroni  and  served  four  years,  and  defeated  for  City  Jus- 
tice in  '97.  Served  as  head  teacher  several  years  and  is 
one  of  the  prominent  citizens  of  the  town.  Was  maiTied 
in  England  December  25,  1858,  to  Clara,  daughter  of 
John  and  Hannah  Stafford,  by  whom  he  had  nine  'dl- 
dren  in  England  and  three  in  America.  She  died  in  'SO. 
Was  married  again  to  Sarah  Kellett  nee  Prestwich,  Avho 
had  one  child:  Dorothy.  The  first  wife's  children  living 
are:  Samuel  E.,  Albert  W.,  Mary  Jane,  Alice,  Josepli", 
James,  Clara,  Aaron  and  Ervin. 


HISTORY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  415 

jl  AEDY,  HON.  AARON,  member  of  the  State  Legisla- 
jl  ture,  sou  of  George  and  Merab,  was  born  near  Man- 
/  Chester,  England,  ])ecember  22,  1839.  He  learned 
the  trade  of  a  weaver,  joined  the  Mormon  church  l^Yb- 
ruary  28,  1854,  and  came  to  Utah  in  '63,  crossing  the 
plaius  in  Capt.  Peter  Nebeker's  ox-train.  He  reached 
Moroni  without  capital,  but  soon  secured  a  farm,  worked 
on  the  railroad;  was  salesman  in  the  Co-op  store  eight 
years  and  schoolteacher  fifteen  years.  Served  as  th-i 
first  City  Recorder;  was  Mayor  three  terms.  Justice  of 
the  Peace  twelve  years  and  County  Selectman  from  '80 
to  '82.  Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  In 
'96  he  was  elected  to  the  State  Legislature  and  appointed 
chairman  of  the  Committee  on  State  Prison  and  T.Klas- 
trial  School.  He  took  an  active  interest  in  these  mat- 
tei's  and  secured  legislation  beneficial  tO'  the  inmates, 
making  many  warm  friends  through  his  philanthropic 
work.  He  now  owns  fift}^  acres  of  land  and  does  notary 
work.  Was  first  married  in  England  September  11,  1S61, 
to  Elizabeth  Prestwich,  who  died  June  20,  1870,  leaving 
two  children:  Aaron  and  Elizabeth.  Second  wife,  mar- 
ried in  Salt  Lake  City  December  19,  1870,  was  Emma-, 
daughter  of  Bishop  AVamer  of  Nephi.  She  had  seven 
children:  James,  Addie  and  Wilford,  liviug;  William, 
Samuel,  Joseph  and  Mary,  deceased.  Third  wife  was 
Amy  Faux.  She  had  seven  children :  Charlotte,  Walter, 
Edna  aud  John  H.,  living;  George,  Amy  and  Arthur,  de- 
ceased. Fourth  wife  was  Anna  M.  Anderson,  maiTied 
September  9, 1880.    She  is  president  of  the  Relief  society. 

jl  UTCHINSON,  DAVID,  farmer,  son  of  David  and 
Jl  Janet  Crookston,  was  born  in  Fifeshire,  Scotland, 
'  May  16,  1847.  He  was  born  in  the  Mormon  church, 
his  folks  having  joined  in  early  days.  When  a  boy  he 
worked  at  coal  mining.  In  '61  the  family  came  to  Utah, 
crossing  the  plains  in  Capt.  Murdoch's  company,  and  lo- 
cated at  American  Fork.  He  came  to  Moroni  in  '62,  his 
parents  having  come  before,  and  bought  a  small  farm; 
now  has  forty  acres.  He  has  been  engaged  in  woolgrow- 
ing,  but  now  attends  to  his  farm.    Is  superintendent  of 


416  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

the  Centreville  Siiuday-school,  a  ward  teacher  and  mem- 
ber of  the  High  Priests'  quorum.  He  is  an  energetic 
church  worker  and  a  good  citizen.  Was  married  in 
Moroui  in  October,  1850,  to  Jane,  daughter  of  William 
and  Jane  Longshire  Prestwich,  born  in  England  May  9, 
1847.  They  have  nine  living  children:  Jane,  Janet, 
David,  William,  Dorothy,  Thomas,  Jemima,  William  and 
Mary;  three,  Isabel,  Elizabeth  and  an  infant,  deceased. 

IRONS,  BISHOP  JOHN  W.,  son  of  John  W.  and  Hester 
Applegate,  was  bom  in  Ocean  counTy,  New  Jen^ey, 
November  21,  1823.  He  was  raised  there  on  a  farm 
and  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '60.  In  '63  he  came  to 
Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in  an  ox-train  under  0^)1.  Pres- 
ton, and  stopped  in  Salt  Lake  City  one  winter.  He  came 
to  Moroni  in  the  spring  of  '64  and  has  residcMl  here  since. 
Took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  as  Captain 
of  Company  A,  infantiy.  In  '77  he  was  appointed  bishop 
by  Brigham  Young  and  still  retains  that  positirn.  Is 
president  of  the  Co-op  store  and  has  been  for  the  past 
twenty  years.  He  is  an  active,  representative  citizen, 
having  been  quite  prominent  in  all  public  a'Tairs  in 
Moroni.  Was  married  April  24,  1844,  to  I>eborab  P., 
daughter  of  John  and  Rebecca  Lippincott,  born  in  Ocean 
county.  New  Jersey.  They  have  had  four  children:  Will 
L.,  farmer  and  stockraiser;  Annie,  wife  of  Hyrum  Jack- 
son, a  telegraph  operator;  Hetty  I.  married  Owen  Smith, 
now  dead;  and  John  W.  was  teller  in  McCoraick's  bank. 

IRONS,  WILL  L.,  farmer  and  stockraiser,  son  of  Bishop 
John  W.  and  Deborah  P.,  was  borii  in  Ocean  county, 
New  Jersey,  December  18,  1859.  When  lie  was  4 
years  of  age  the  family  removed  to  Utah,  stopping  for  a 
time  in  Salt  Lake  City,  then  came  to  IMoroni.  He  went 
through  the  hom.e  district  schools  and  took  a  short  course 
in  the  Deseret  UniA^rsity.  He  then  bought  a  farm  and 
now  has  a  nice  place,  making  a  specialty  of  breeding 
Hereford  cattle.  Sers^ed  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council 
several  years,  and  in  '84  Avas  elected  to  the  office  of 
County  Collector  on  the   Republican   ticket.     He    is    a 


HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  417 

stockholder  in  the  Co-op  store  and  a  well-known  repre- 
sentative citizen.  Was  married  in  Moroni  to  Sarah  J. 
Jolley,  born  in  Payson  September  22,  18G1.  The}^  have 
eight  children:  Hettie  I.,  Will  M.,  Elmo,  John  W.,  Edith 
I.,  Jennie  P.,  Leola  and  Eoldo. 

JACKSON,  HYRUM,  farmer,  son  of  John  and  Jane, 
was  born  in  Wakefield,  England,  May  16,  1869.  The 
family  emigrated  in  '73  and  located  in  Moroni, 
where  they  now  reside.  Father  was  a  shoemaker,  lly- 
rum  grew  up  here  and  has  always  followed  farming,  lie 
now  owns  a  small  farm  of  fifteen  acres,  which  he  culti- 
vates. He  was  married  in  Moroni  February  12,  1895,  to 
Annie  D.  Cahoon  nee  Irons,  daughter  of  Bishop  J.  W. 
and  Deborah,  born  in  Ocean  county,  New  Jersey,  July  8, 
1857.  She  has  two  children  by  former  marriage:  Stephen 
E.,  born  June  12,  1881,  and  Annie  D.,  July  22,  1884.  She 
learned  telegraphy  when  only  13  years  of  age  and  has 
ever  since  had  charge  of  the  Deseret  Telegraph  office  at 
Moroni. 

JENSEN,  ANDEEW,  known  as  ^'Little  Soldier,"  son  of 
Peter  and  Kirsten,  was  born  in  Denmark  December 
4,  1844.  He  was  raised  on  a  fann,  joined  the  Mor- 
mon church  in  "()1  and  in  '62  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the 
plains  in  Cupt.  Madsen's  independent  train.  He  walked 
all  the  way  and  helped  drive  200  cows.  The  family  lo- 
cated in  Moroni,  where  he  secured  a  ten-acre  farm;  now 
has  175  acres,  and  is  engaged  in  stock  and  fruitraising 
and  woolgrowing.  He  ran  the  Co-op  sawmill  in  early 
days  for  ten  years,  then  managed  the  United  Order  sheep 
and  cattle  four  years.  In  company  with  others  he  built 
a  sawmill  in  Canal  Creek  canyon.  He  afterward  bought 
a  steam  sawmill  in  Four-Mile  canyon  and  operated  that 
several  years.  In  '85  he  and  brothers  Jens  and  Christian 
built  the  Jensen  Bros.'  flouring  mill,  which  has  recently 
been  remodeled,  and  now  is  an  up-to-date  sixty-barrel 
mill.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  plaster  mill  near  Nephi, 
a  director  in  the  First  National  Bank  at  Nephi  and  in- 
terested in  the  Nephi  Mining  and  Salt  Manufacturing 


418  HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY. 

company  and  Fish  Springs  mines.  He  served  in  the 
Black  Hawlv  war  and  was  given  the  name  of  ''Little  Sol- 
dier" by  Madison  D.  Hamilton.  He  is  one  of  the  leading 
citizens  and  a  prominent  financier  and  business  man. 
Was  married  in  Salt  Lake  City  to  Maria,  daughter  of 
Lauritz  and  Maria  Lauritzen,  born  in  Denmark  May  18, 
1848.  They  have  had  ten  children:  Maria,  Mary  C, 
Annie,  Louisa,  Andrew  E.,  Serena,  Hannah,  Martena 
aiud  Charles  W.,  living;  James  P.,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  HON.  ANDI:EW  L.,  farmer  and  ex-Mayor, 
son  of  Jens  and  Mary,  was  born  in  Denmark  Au- 
gust 31,  1848.  'l^he  family  joined  the  Mormon 
church  and  in  '62  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the  plains  in 
Capt.  Van  Cott's  company,  and  located  at  Moroni,  Avhere 
parents  both  died.  Andrew  was  raised  here  to  farming 
and  now  has  a  farm  of  150  acres.  He  took  an  active  part 
in  the  Black  Hawk  war.  In  '68  he  returned  to  the  Mis- 
souri river  after  emigrants  under  Capt.  Seely,  and  in 
crossing  Green  river  the  boat  was  capsized  and  he  with 
others  was  thrown  into  the  water,  six  men  being 
drowned.  In  '82  he  went  on  a  two  years'  mission  to  Ala- 
bama; made  several  converts.  He  is  a  stockholder  and 
vice-president  in  the  Co-op  store.  Served  as  a  member  of 
the  City  Council  several  years  and  was  Mayor  eight  years. 
Is  an  active  Bepublican  and  has  been  a  delegate  to  many 
county  and  State  conventions,  being  well  known  and  an 
influential  man  in  the  community.  Was  married  in  Salt 
Lake  City  May  19, 1873,  to  Christina,  daughter  of  Rasmus 
P.  and  Maria  Christensen,  born  in  Denmark  February  14, 
1857.  They  have  had  ten  children :  Mary,  Maria,  Hetty, 
Andrew,  James  V.,  John  E.,  Franklin  P.,  Delina  C.  and 
Delmore  W.,  living;  Lula,  deceased. 

JENSEN,  JENS  W.,  farmer  and  one  of  the  firm  of 
Jensen  Bros.'  Milling  company,  was  born  in  Den- 
mark in  Januai-y,  1839.  He  learned  the  trade  of  a 
weavei'  and  joined  the  Mormon  church  in  '61.  In  '62  he 
started  for  Utah  with  his  parents  and  family  of  nine  per- 
sons, crossing  the  plains  in  Capt  Madsen's  company,  and 


HISTORY    OF    SANPETE    COUNTY.  419 

located  in  Moroni.  His  parents  both  died  here.  He 
worked  at  anything-  lie  could  get  to  do  and  finally  secured 
a  small  farm;  now  owns  eighty -five  acres.  In  '84  he 
and  brothers  Andreas  and  Christian  built  the  flouring 
mill  two  miles  east  of  town,  and  in  '97  they  remodeled  it, 
making  it  sixty-barrel  capacity,  with  all  the  latest  and 
improved  machinery  for  merchant  and  custom  work.  He 
took  an  active  part  in  the  Black  Hawk  war,  being  in 
many  excursions  against  the  Indians.  Served  as  City 
Treasurer  fourteen  years.  In  '85  he  went  on  a  two  years' 
mission  to  Denmark  and  presided  over  a  branch  of  the 
church.  He  is  quite  an  extensive  woolgrower  and  a  di- 
rector in  the  Co-op  store.  Is  a  member  of  the  High 
Priests'  quorum.  Has  always  been  a  leader  in  local  en- 
terprises and  an  energetic  and  reiDresentative  citizen. 
Was  married  first  in  Salt  Lake  City  to  Annie  Anderson, 
now  deceased.  His  second  wife  was  Kersten  M.  Soren- 
son.  She  has  six  children:  Neils  P.,  Mary,  James,  An- 
drew, Caroline  and  Christian.  The  third  wife  was  Sophia 
M.  Anderson.  She  has  four  children:  Annie  C,  Frank- 
lin P.,  Ella  y.  and  Junius  C.  Mr.  Jensen  also  moved  to 
San  Luis  valley,  Colorado,  in  '88,  returning  in  '96.  While 
there  he  had  the  misfortune  to  lose  his  little  son  Orson 
H.,  3  years  of  age,  who  strayed  from  home.  An  active 
search  was  kept  up  all  night,  but  when  found  he  was 
frozen  to  death,  it  being  a  bitter  night. 

KEMP,  CHAELES,  retired  millwright,  son  of  John 
and  Ann,  was  born  in  Lancashire,  England,  in  '31. 
He  learned  the  trade  of  a  machinist,  serving  an  ap- 
prenticeship of  seven  years.  In  December,  1848,  he  joined 
the  Mormon  church  and  in  '53  came  to  Utah,  crossing  the 
plains  in  Capt.  Wheelock's  company,  and  located  at 
Nephi.  He  superintended  and  helped  make  the  machin- 
ery for  a  cut-nail  factory  and  molasses  mills  and  erected 
the  building.  In  '59  he  came  to  Moroni  and  tried  farming 
for  a  time,  but  returned  to  his  trade  and  assisted  in  con- 
structing flouring  mills  in  Moroni  and  other  towns,  put- 
ting fifty  mills  together  in  Utah  and  Idaho.  Assisted  in 
putting  in  the  electric  light  plant  at  Mt.  Pleasant  and  in- 


420  HISTORY    OF   SANPETE   COUNTY. 

troduced  a  new  kind  of  water-wheel  for  power.  He  put 
in  the  first  full  line  roller  flour  mill  in  Utah  at  Fairview. 
Served  as  County  Selectman  one  term.  Is  a  member  of 
the  High  Priests'  quorum  and  an  old,  respected  resident. 
AVas  married  fii'st  in  England  to  Adelaide  S.  Prestwich, 
who  died  in  Nephi  with  her  daughter  Alice  Ann.  Second 
wife  was  Sarah  Blackham,  born  in  England.  The  chil- 
dren are:  Jesse,  Seth,  Mary,  Sarah  J.,  Olive,  Elizabeth, 
Anna  and  Maud,  living;  Charles  and  Martha  A.,  de- 
ceased. 

p  AUIIITZEX,  CHRISTIAN,  barber,  son  of  Lauritz 
\^  and  Matilda,  was  born  in  Moroni  February  17, 1875. 
His  father  came  to  Utah  in  '60,  crossing  the  plains 
in  an  ox-train,  and  was  one  of  the  first  settlers  in  Moroni. 
He  resided  here  until  his  death,  which  occurred  August 
11,  1896.  Mother  died  August  11,  1897.  They  left  three 
children:  Ida,  Christian  and  Lewis.  Christian  grew  up 
here  and  followed  farming  and  stockraising  till  '97,  when 
he  opened  a  barber  shop,  having  learned  the  business  of 
Walter  Lund.  He  is  doing  well  and  gives  general  satis- 
faction to  his  many  patrons. 

elVINGSTON,  CHARLES  C,  postmaster,  son  of 
James  C.  and  Agnes,  was  bom  in  Salt  Lake  City 
Februaiy  6,  1868.  He  was  educated  in  the  district 
schools  and  attended  the  Deseret  University  one  year. 
In  '79  he  came  to  Moroni,  where  he  engaged  as  salesman 
in  the  different  mercantile  institutions  till  January  5, 
1898,  when  he  was  appointed  postmaster.  He  is  a  partner 
in  the  Christensen  general  merchandise  business  that  car- 
ries a  stock  of  |2,500  or  more  and  does  an  annual  business 
of  |7,500.  Is  an  active  man  in  Sunday-school  and  church 
matters,  being  one  of  the  department  teachers.  He  is 
an  enthusiastic  Republican  and  a  very  energetic  and  suc- 
cessful business  man,  well  liked  in  the  community.  Was 
married  in  Salt  Lake  City  December  25,  1889,  to  Julia, 
daughter  of  James  and  Christina  Sellers,  bom  in  Salt 
Lake  City  September  6,  1868.  They  have  six  children: 
May,  Flora,  Laura,  Ethel,  Ernest  and  Leonard. 


NEILS    OLSON, 
MORONI. 


MRS.    NEILS    OLSON, 
MORONL 


I 


HISTOEY   OF   SANPETE   COUNTY.  421 

COWllY,  GEORGE  W.,  famier,  Constable  and  deputy 
Slienlf,  son  of  Abner  and  Louisa,  was  born  in  Manti 
May  19,  1857.  He  came  to  Moroni  August  19,  1889. 
Acted  as  special  police  for  two  years  and  was  then 
elected  City  Marshal  in  '92.  Is  at  pi'esent  precinct  Con- 
stable and  deputy  Sheriff.  Served  three  years  in  the 
Utah  National  Guard,  being-  a  Second  Lieutenant,  and 
promoted  to  Captain.  Is  an  Elder  in  the  Mormon  church 
and  a  respected  citizen.  Was  married  in  Moroni  Decem- 
ber 23,  1879,  to  Xina,  daughter  of  Heniy  and  Martha 
Draper.  They  have  two  children:  Martha  1^.  and 
George  E. 

eOWKY,  JAMES  W.,  farmer,  son  of  Abner  and 
Louisa,  was  born  in  Moroni  Febmary  25,  18C3.  He 
grew  up  there  and  followed  freighting  for  several 
years,  then  was  a  contractor  in  grading  part  of  the  San- 
pete Valley  and  Rio  Grande  Western  railways. 
In  '91  he  engaged  in  farming  and  has  followed  that  work. 
He  now  owns  a  twenty-acre  far-m,  which  is  under  good 
cultivation.  He  is  first  counsellor  to  Bishop  Taylor  and 
superintendent  of  the  Sunday-school  and  a  well  re- 
spected citizen.  Was  married  in  Sterling  Octobe